Proposed Stoney Creek residential towers called 'failure of planning'

News Apr 12, 2019 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

A proposal for three residential towers of 59, 54 and 48 storeys at 310 Frances Ave. near the Stoney Creek waterfront could be viewed as a failure of planning, according to a member of the Hamilton design review panel.

The panel heard from the developer, New Horizon Development Group, during an April 11 presentation at Hamilton City Hall. The buildings, which do not require zoning or official plan amendments, would all surpass what’s currently Hamilton’s tallest residential tower, the 43-storey Landmark Place, at 100 Main St. E.

Tim Smith, a planner with Urban Design Strategies Inc. and design review panel member, prefaced his remarks by stating he didn’t want to appear critical of the development team, represented by New Horizon co-owner Jeff Paikin.

Smith argued the proposed buildings are at least twice the size of what should be permitted in the area. He also addressed a lack of transit, although the developer has proposed running a shuttle to carry commuters to the Centennial GO station, currently under construction.

“This is really a failure of planning … There’s no secondary plan here and it’s clear that no one had a real idea of how this area was going to be developed,” Smith said.

In an interview afterwards, Paikin acknowledged there would be more traffic in the area, but noted the developer conducted studies with Paradigm Transportation Solutions that found area roads would still have the necessary capacity.

Paikin said the tower proposal reflects a growing trend within Hamilton that’s leading homebuyers away from single-detached dwellings toward condominium living.

“From 10 years ago, it’s night and day,” said Paikin. “Hamilton has a rich tradition of not being a condo-friendly city. In the last 10 years, that’s changed significantly.”

Paikin expects the residential units — which are expected to number 1,836 in total — will appeal to first-time home buyers and young professionals, as well as those looking to downsize from a single-detached home.

Pending site plan approval, Paikin hopes to have shovels in the ground in about a year’s time. New Horizon is already familiar with the area, having received approval in 2016 for 40 townhouse units, 38 freehold townhouses and 129 residential units at 311 and 312 Frances Ave.

The tower project at 310 Frances has been proposed as a mixed-use development with a ground floor commercial component. The towers will be designed to include several levels of above-ground parking.

In an interview, Ward 10 Coun. Maria Pearson, who represents the area, said the zoning that permits residential towers with no height limit dates back to the former Saltfleet township council of the 1970s.

Pointing to the existing 19-storey Bayliner and Shoreliner residential buildings, Pearson noted the site was originally earmarked for 13 highrises, although only two were built.

“They had a vision,” said Pearson, referring to the former Saltfleet township, which Stoney Creek absorbed in 1974 prior to amalgamation with the City of Hamilton in 2001. “It’s unfortunate that vision didn’t follow through.”

Pearson is expecting seven delegations to speak to the project at an April 16 planning committee meeting. She is taking part in the site plan review process. But she noted the city cannot refuse approval of the project, as the current zoning already permits it.

Pearson added she’s working on getting transit on the north of the Queen Elizabeth Way, but must ensure the need is there to justify it.

In the meantime, some traffic-calming measures are planned for the area, including signalized intersections at Green and North Service roads and at Drakes Drive and North Service Road, as well as bicycle lane demarcation on Frances Avenue.

Proposed Stoney Creek residential towers called 'failure of planning'

Plan would bring 59, 54 and 48-storey highrises to waterfront, making them Hamilton's tallest buildings

News Apr 12, 2019 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

A proposal for three residential towers of 59, 54 and 48 storeys at 310 Frances Ave. near the Stoney Creek waterfront could be viewed as a failure of planning, according to a member of the Hamilton design review panel.

The panel heard from the developer, New Horizon Development Group, during an April 11 presentation at Hamilton City Hall. The buildings, which do not require zoning or official plan amendments, would all surpass what’s currently Hamilton’s tallest residential tower, the 43-storey Landmark Place, at 100 Main St. E.

Tim Smith, a planner with Urban Design Strategies Inc. and design review panel member, prefaced his remarks by stating he didn’t want to appear critical of the development team, represented by New Horizon co-owner Jeff Paikin.

Smith argued the proposed buildings are at least twice the size of what should be permitted in the area. He also addressed a lack of transit, although the developer has proposed running a shuttle to carry commuters to the Centennial GO station, currently under construction.

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“This is really a failure of planning … There’s no secondary plan here and it’s clear that no one had a real idea of how this area was going to be developed,” Smith said.

In an interview afterwards, Paikin acknowledged there would be more traffic in the area, but noted the developer conducted studies with Paradigm Transportation Solutions that found area roads would still have the necessary capacity.

Paikin said the tower proposal reflects a growing trend within Hamilton that’s leading homebuyers away from single-detached dwellings toward condominium living.

“From 10 years ago, it’s night and day,” said Paikin. “Hamilton has a rich tradition of not being a condo-friendly city. In the last 10 years, that’s changed significantly.”

Paikin expects the residential units — which are expected to number 1,836 in total — will appeal to first-time home buyers and young professionals, as well as those looking to downsize from a single-detached home.

Pending site plan approval, Paikin hopes to have shovels in the ground in about a year’s time. New Horizon is already familiar with the area, having received approval in 2016 for 40 townhouse units, 38 freehold townhouses and 129 residential units at 311 and 312 Frances Ave.

The tower project at 310 Frances has been proposed as a mixed-use development with a ground floor commercial component. The towers will be designed to include several levels of above-ground parking.

In an interview, Ward 10 Coun. Maria Pearson, who represents the area, said the zoning that permits residential towers with no height limit dates back to the former Saltfleet township council of the 1970s.

Pointing to the existing 19-storey Bayliner and Shoreliner residential buildings, Pearson noted the site was originally earmarked for 13 highrises, although only two were built.

“They had a vision,” said Pearson, referring to the former Saltfleet township, which Stoney Creek absorbed in 1974 prior to amalgamation with the City of Hamilton in 2001. “It’s unfortunate that vision didn’t follow through.”

Pearson is expecting seven delegations to speak to the project at an April 16 planning committee meeting. She is taking part in the site plan review process. But she noted the city cannot refuse approval of the project, as the current zoning already permits it.

Pearson added she’s working on getting transit on the north of the Queen Elizabeth Way, but must ensure the need is there to justify it.

In the meantime, some traffic-calming measures are planned for the area, including signalized intersections at Green and North Service roads and at Drakes Drive and North Service Road, as well as bicycle lane demarcation on Frances Avenue.

Proposed Stoney Creek residential towers called 'failure of planning'

Plan would bring 59, 54 and 48-storey highrises to waterfront, making them Hamilton's tallest buildings

News Apr 12, 2019 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

A proposal for three residential towers of 59, 54 and 48 storeys at 310 Frances Ave. near the Stoney Creek waterfront could be viewed as a failure of planning, according to a member of the Hamilton design review panel.

The panel heard from the developer, New Horizon Development Group, during an April 11 presentation at Hamilton City Hall. The buildings, which do not require zoning or official plan amendments, would all surpass what’s currently Hamilton’s tallest residential tower, the 43-storey Landmark Place, at 100 Main St. E.

Tim Smith, a planner with Urban Design Strategies Inc. and design review panel member, prefaced his remarks by stating he didn’t want to appear critical of the development team, represented by New Horizon co-owner Jeff Paikin.

Smith argued the proposed buildings are at least twice the size of what should be permitted in the area. He also addressed a lack of transit, although the developer has proposed running a shuttle to carry commuters to the Centennial GO station, currently under construction.

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“This is really a failure of planning … There’s no secondary plan here and it’s clear that no one had a real idea of how this area was going to be developed,” Smith said.

In an interview afterwards, Paikin acknowledged there would be more traffic in the area, but noted the developer conducted studies with Paradigm Transportation Solutions that found area roads would still have the necessary capacity.

Paikin said the tower proposal reflects a growing trend within Hamilton that’s leading homebuyers away from single-detached dwellings toward condominium living.

“From 10 years ago, it’s night and day,” said Paikin. “Hamilton has a rich tradition of not being a condo-friendly city. In the last 10 years, that’s changed significantly.”

Paikin expects the residential units — which are expected to number 1,836 in total — will appeal to first-time home buyers and young professionals, as well as those looking to downsize from a single-detached home.

Pending site plan approval, Paikin hopes to have shovels in the ground in about a year’s time. New Horizon is already familiar with the area, having received approval in 2016 for 40 townhouse units, 38 freehold townhouses and 129 residential units at 311 and 312 Frances Ave.

The tower project at 310 Frances has been proposed as a mixed-use development with a ground floor commercial component. The towers will be designed to include several levels of above-ground parking.

In an interview, Ward 10 Coun. Maria Pearson, who represents the area, said the zoning that permits residential towers with no height limit dates back to the former Saltfleet township council of the 1970s.

Pointing to the existing 19-storey Bayliner and Shoreliner residential buildings, Pearson noted the site was originally earmarked for 13 highrises, although only two were built.

“They had a vision,” said Pearson, referring to the former Saltfleet township, which Stoney Creek absorbed in 1974 prior to amalgamation with the City of Hamilton in 2001. “It’s unfortunate that vision didn’t follow through.”

Pearson is expecting seven delegations to speak to the project at an April 16 planning committee meeting. She is taking part in the site plan review process. But she noted the city cannot refuse approval of the project, as the current zoning already permits it.

Pearson added she’s working on getting transit on the north of the Queen Elizabeth Way, but must ensure the need is there to justify it.

In the meantime, some traffic-calming measures are planned for the area, including signalized intersections at Green and North Service roads and at Drakes Drive and North Service Road, as well as bicycle lane demarcation on Frances Avenue.