VIDEO: Ancaster High School students join 'Students Say No' movement against Premier Doug Ford's education reforms

News Apr 04, 2019 by Mike Pearson Ancaster News

About 200 Ancaster High School students joined a province-wide walkout from classes Thursday at 1:15 p.m. to protest Ontario Premier Doug Ford's provincial education agenda.

Concerned students who took part in the rally, dubbed Students Say No, spoke to Hamilton Community News for more than 30 minutes, outlining concerns ranging from changes to special education, to larger class sizes, cuts to sports and extra-curriculars, new online learning requirements and post-secondary tuition assistance.

Alex Comeau worries cuts to education funding will result in the loss of specialized programs that help students with autism and mental health issues. Ancaster High offers a Secondary Social Communication program for students with autism spectrum disorder, as well as an Individualized Education Program.

“For us as special-ed kids, I go to this school for a program that is to help people who are autistic, to help them with social skills. If Doug Ford cuts this, my major concern is that I’m being put in a classroom that doesn’t support my needs and where it will be so much more difficult to pass.”

A new requirement to have all students complete four online e-Learning courses will also be difficult for autistic students, said Comeau.

“A lot of autistic people have focus issues. This is not going to end well.”

Several students said the e-Learning courses can be difficult to follow and lack the hands-on guidance from a live instructor that many students require.

Comeau predicts any cuts to mental health programs, including those designed to help LGBTQ students, could be catastrophic.

“Doug Ford is risking lives at this point,” said Comeau, who is in Grade 10.

Grade 11 student Mya Reed has a 94 per cent average, but admits she’s needed extra help with math in past years. With larger class sizes looming, she worries about her ability to keep up with the curriculum.

“If I didn’t have (teachers) last year helping with my math, I would have totally flunked it. They have given me so much help that I couldn’t see myself getting the grades I have now without them.”

Haneen Kadhom, one of the rally organizers, said the provincial government decision to scrap the free tuition program for low-income students will result in fewer high school graduates pursuing post-secondary education.

“If they’re poor they can’t go up anymore. They’re stuck down there. People who are getting rich, they only get richer now. And that’s the capitalist government that we don’t want,” said said.

Other students at the rally spoke out against plans to allow class sizes to rise from 22 to an average of 28 students, looming teacher job losses and cuts to arts programs.

Students from about 700 schools across the province joined the Students Say No walkout.

VIDEO: Ancaster High School students join 'Students Say No' movement against Premier Doug Ford's education reforms

About 200 walk out of classes

News Apr 04, 2019 by Mike Pearson Ancaster News

About 200 Ancaster High School students joined a province-wide walkout from classes Thursday at 1:15 p.m. to protest Ontario Premier Doug Ford's provincial education agenda.

Concerned students who took part in the rally, dubbed Students Say No, spoke to Hamilton Community News for more than 30 minutes, outlining concerns ranging from changes to special education, to larger class sizes, cuts to sports and extra-curriculars, new online learning requirements and post-secondary tuition assistance.

Alex Comeau worries cuts to education funding will result in the loss of specialized programs that help students with autism and mental health issues. Ancaster High offers a Secondary Social Communication program for students with autism spectrum disorder, as well as an Individualized Education Program.

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“For us as special-ed kids, I go to this school for a program that is to help people who are autistic, to help them with social skills. If Doug Ford cuts this, my major concern is that I’m being put in a classroom that doesn’t support my needs and where it will be so much more difficult to pass.”

A new requirement to have all students complete four online e-Learning courses will also be difficult for autistic students, said Comeau.

“A lot of autistic people have focus issues. This is not going to end well.”

Several students said the e-Learning courses can be difficult to follow and lack the hands-on guidance from a live instructor that many students require.

Comeau predicts any cuts to mental health programs, including those designed to help LGBTQ students, could be catastrophic.

“Doug Ford is risking lives at this point,” said Comeau, who is in Grade 10.

Grade 11 student Mya Reed has a 94 per cent average, but admits she’s needed extra help with math in past years. With larger class sizes looming, she worries about her ability to keep up with the curriculum.

“If I didn’t have (teachers) last year helping with my math, I would have totally flunked it. They have given me so much help that I couldn’t see myself getting the grades I have now without them.”

Haneen Kadhom, one of the rally organizers, said the provincial government decision to scrap the free tuition program for low-income students will result in fewer high school graduates pursuing post-secondary education.

“If they’re poor they can’t go up anymore. They’re stuck down there. People who are getting rich, they only get richer now. And that’s the capitalist government that we don’t want,” said said.

Other students at the rally spoke out against plans to allow class sizes to rise from 22 to an average of 28 students, looming teacher job losses and cuts to arts programs.

Students from about 700 schools across the province joined the Students Say No walkout.

VIDEO: Ancaster High School students join 'Students Say No' movement against Premier Doug Ford's education reforms

About 200 walk out of classes

News Apr 04, 2019 by Mike Pearson Ancaster News

About 200 Ancaster High School students joined a province-wide walkout from classes Thursday at 1:15 p.m. to protest Ontario Premier Doug Ford's provincial education agenda.

Concerned students who took part in the rally, dubbed Students Say No, spoke to Hamilton Community News for more than 30 minutes, outlining concerns ranging from changes to special education, to larger class sizes, cuts to sports and extra-curriculars, new online learning requirements and post-secondary tuition assistance.

Alex Comeau worries cuts to education funding will result in the loss of specialized programs that help students with autism and mental health issues. Ancaster High offers a Secondary Social Communication program for students with autism spectrum disorder, as well as an Individualized Education Program.

Related Content

“For us as special-ed kids, I go to this school for a program that is to help people who are autistic, to help them with social skills. If Doug Ford cuts this, my major concern is that I’m being put in a classroom that doesn’t support my needs and where it will be so much more difficult to pass.”

A new requirement to have all students complete four online e-Learning courses will also be difficult for autistic students, said Comeau.

“A lot of autistic people have focus issues. This is not going to end well.”

Several students said the e-Learning courses can be difficult to follow and lack the hands-on guidance from a live instructor that many students require.

Comeau predicts any cuts to mental health programs, including those designed to help LGBTQ students, could be catastrophic.

“Doug Ford is risking lives at this point,” said Comeau, who is in Grade 10.

Grade 11 student Mya Reed has a 94 per cent average, but admits she’s needed extra help with math in past years. With larger class sizes looming, she worries about her ability to keep up with the curriculum.

“If I didn’t have (teachers) last year helping with my math, I would have totally flunked it. They have given me so much help that I couldn’t see myself getting the grades I have now without them.”

Haneen Kadhom, one of the rally organizers, said the provincial government decision to scrap the free tuition program for low-income students will result in fewer high school graduates pursuing post-secondary education.

“If they’re poor they can’t go up anymore. They’re stuck down there. People who are getting rich, they only get richer now. And that’s the capitalist government that we don’t want,” said said.

Other students at the rally spoke out against plans to allow class sizes to rise from 22 to an average of 28 students, looming teacher job losses and cuts to arts programs.

Students from about 700 schools across the province joined the Students Say No walkout.