Dundas Beverly Tire development collaboration comes during construction

News Mar 08, 2019 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

City of Hamilton planning staff say a tree will be planted by Beverly Tire in an effort to block the bright yellow second-storey side wall of the company’s new two-level auto service centre at 89 Osler Dr. But the property’s immediate neighbour says that will fall short of reducing visual impacts.

Grant Dolson forwarded photos showing the view from his Tweedsmuir Avenue home, compared to the view almost a year ago, to several city representatives and Dundas Star News.

Since then, Dolson has heard from both the city – and got a visit from a Beverly Tire representative about the ongoing development and how to lessen its visual impact on the neighbourhood.

“At least there’s an agreement to have communication,” Dolson said on Friday, March 8.

“That’s what we asked for from day one. It’s frustrating there couldn’t have been collaboration on the front end of it.”

He said he bought the property 27 years ago, recognizing it was next to commercial property, but didn’t anticipate something the size of the new Beverly Tire structure.

“Nobody’s going to be 100 per cent happy, but we can come up with something where business can thrive, provide jobs and you can feel good coming home,” Dolson said.

He said there was movement over just a few days and it made him more optimistic by the end of the week.

“I am only requesting that common sense be employed that will show some kind of respect and compassion for the abutting property owners,” Dolson said, shortly after emailing city planning staff on Tuesday, March 5.

“This irresponsible development has angered me from the onset, but this latest action, bright yellow siding, facing my backyard is making my wife and I physically sick.”

Dolson asked the city’s planning department for an explanation why it is considered acceptable to have bright yellow siding on a second storey that faces backyards of single family homes.

“Please, someone show some common sense and stop this insanity. It is negatively impacting the lives of the residents of Tweedsmuir Avenue,” Dolson said.

In an email response, city planner Daniel Barnett said the side of the auto service centre faces the backyards of Tweedsmuir Avenue homes.

“The original plans included the entire side wall of the building to have yellow paint above the doors. Staff worked with the applicant to come up with a compromise that allowed for their company colours to be included, but limited the location to only a portion of the side wall,” Barnett stated.

“It should also be noted that under the Ontario Planning Act and Ontario Building Code municipalities do not have the authority to regulate the colour of building materials used on commercial buildings.”

Barnett added the applicant is required to plant a tree along the lot line to “help visually reduce the impacts of the commercial building on the residential lots.”

In a response emailed to Barnett, planning director Steve Robichaud, planning and economic development department spokesperson Marie Fitzpatrick and local city councillor Arlene VanderBeek, Dolson stated: “The compromise that was negotiated with the applicants still represents approximately 60 square metres of blazing yellow siding that is visible from every vantage point in our backyard and 50 per cent of the rooms in our house.”

Dolson said his ultimate goal is to reach an agreement with Beverly Tire, supported by the city, to change the siding colour to grey on the side of the building facing backyards of Tweedsmuir Avenue. Dolson and Barnett are planning to meet.

“A representative from Beverly Tire has already contacted me in person and has offered to work with the city … to try and come up with a resolution. I am optimistic that this collaborative approach can result in a solution acceptable to all stakeholders,” Dolson said.

He also has concerns about noise impacts and noted once the service centre starts operating neighbours can complain to bylaw enforcement.

“Who wants to do that the rest of their life,” Dolson said.

He suggested the city planning department and Beverly Tire missed an opportunity to collaborate with the community during the past four years – though he acknowledged they are communicating now.

“I’d rather see it at the front end,” he said.

Beverly Tire’s parent company, Benson Group of Cornwall, bought the former Delta Auto Service Centre at 89 Osler Dr. in December 2014 following a formal consultation with city of Hamilton planners about its proposal for the site.

In 2017, the company applied for and received three minor variances to permit construction of the two-storey service centre with up to eight service bays.

Dundas Beverly Tire development collaboration comes during construction

Neighbours surprised by bright yellow on second storey

News Mar 08, 2019 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

City of Hamilton planning staff say a tree will be planted by Beverly Tire in an effort to block the bright yellow second-storey side wall of the company’s new two-level auto service centre at 89 Osler Dr. But the property’s immediate neighbour says that will fall short of reducing visual impacts.

Grant Dolson forwarded photos showing the view from his Tweedsmuir Avenue home, compared to the view almost a year ago, to several city representatives and Dundas Star News.

Since then, Dolson has heard from both the city – and got a visit from a Beverly Tire representative about the ongoing development and how to lessen its visual impact on the neighbourhood.

“At least there’s an agreement to have communication,” Dolson said on Friday, March 8.

“At least there’s an agreement to have communication, It’s frustrating there couldn’t have been collaboration on the front end of it.” - Grant Dolson

“That’s what we asked for from day one. It’s frustrating there couldn’t have been collaboration on the front end of it.”

He said he bought the property 27 years ago, recognizing it was next to commercial property, but didn’t anticipate something the size of the new Beverly Tire structure.

“Nobody’s going to be 100 per cent happy, but we can come up with something where business can thrive, provide jobs and you can feel good coming home,” Dolson said.

He said there was movement over just a few days and it made him more optimistic by the end of the week.

“I am only requesting that common sense be employed that will show some kind of respect and compassion for the abutting property owners,” Dolson said, shortly after emailing city planning staff on Tuesday, March 5.

“This irresponsible development has angered me from the onset, but this latest action, bright yellow siding, facing my backyard is making my wife and I physically sick.”

Dolson asked the city’s planning department for an explanation why it is considered acceptable to have bright yellow siding on a second storey that faces backyards of single family homes.

“Please, someone show some common sense and stop this insanity. It is negatively impacting the lives of the residents of Tweedsmuir Avenue,” Dolson said.

In an email response, city planner Daniel Barnett said the side of the auto service centre faces the backyards of Tweedsmuir Avenue homes.

“The original plans included the entire side wall of the building to have yellow paint above the doors. Staff worked with the applicant to come up with a compromise that allowed for their company colours to be included, but limited the location to only a portion of the side wall,” Barnett stated.

“It should also be noted that under the Ontario Planning Act and Ontario Building Code municipalities do not have the authority to regulate the colour of building materials used on commercial buildings.”

Barnett added the applicant is required to plant a tree along the lot line to “help visually reduce the impacts of the commercial building on the residential lots.”

In a response emailed to Barnett, planning director Steve Robichaud, planning and economic development department spokesperson Marie Fitzpatrick and local city councillor Arlene VanderBeek, Dolson stated: “The compromise that was negotiated with the applicants still represents approximately 60 square metres of blazing yellow siding that is visible from every vantage point in our backyard and 50 per cent of the rooms in our house.”

Dolson said his ultimate goal is to reach an agreement with Beverly Tire, supported by the city, to change the siding colour to grey on the side of the building facing backyards of Tweedsmuir Avenue. Dolson and Barnett are planning to meet.

“A representative from Beverly Tire has already contacted me in person and has offered to work with the city … to try and come up with a resolution. I am optimistic that this collaborative approach can result in a solution acceptable to all stakeholders,” Dolson said.

He also has concerns about noise impacts and noted once the service centre starts operating neighbours can complain to bylaw enforcement.

“Who wants to do that the rest of their life,” Dolson said.

He suggested the city planning department and Beverly Tire missed an opportunity to collaborate with the community during the past four years – though he acknowledged they are communicating now.

“I’d rather see it at the front end,” he said.

Beverly Tire’s parent company, Benson Group of Cornwall, bought the former Delta Auto Service Centre at 89 Osler Dr. in December 2014 following a formal consultation with city of Hamilton planners about its proposal for the site.

In 2017, the company applied for and received three minor variances to permit construction of the two-storey service centre with up to eight service bays.

Dundas Beverly Tire development collaboration comes during construction

Neighbours surprised by bright yellow on second storey

News Mar 08, 2019 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

City of Hamilton planning staff say a tree will be planted by Beverly Tire in an effort to block the bright yellow second-storey side wall of the company’s new two-level auto service centre at 89 Osler Dr. But the property’s immediate neighbour says that will fall short of reducing visual impacts.

Grant Dolson forwarded photos showing the view from his Tweedsmuir Avenue home, compared to the view almost a year ago, to several city representatives and Dundas Star News.

Since then, Dolson has heard from both the city – and got a visit from a Beverly Tire representative about the ongoing development and how to lessen its visual impact on the neighbourhood.

“At least there’s an agreement to have communication,” Dolson said on Friday, March 8.

“At least there’s an agreement to have communication, It’s frustrating there couldn’t have been collaboration on the front end of it.” - Grant Dolson

“That’s what we asked for from day one. It’s frustrating there couldn’t have been collaboration on the front end of it.”

He said he bought the property 27 years ago, recognizing it was next to commercial property, but didn’t anticipate something the size of the new Beverly Tire structure.

“Nobody’s going to be 100 per cent happy, but we can come up with something where business can thrive, provide jobs and you can feel good coming home,” Dolson said.

He said there was movement over just a few days and it made him more optimistic by the end of the week.

“I am only requesting that common sense be employed that will show some kind of respect and compassion for the abutting property owners,” Dolson said, shortly after emailing city planning staff on Tuesday, March 5.

“This irresponsible development has angered me from the onset, but this latest action, bright yellow siding, facing my backyard is making my wife and I physically sick.”

Dolson asked the city’s planning department for an explanation why it is considered acceptable to have bright yellow siding on a second storey that faces backyards of single family homes.

“Please, someone show some common sense and stop this insanity. It is negatively impacting the lives of the residents of Tweedsmuir Avenue,” Dolson said.

In an email response, city planner Daniel Barnett said the side of the auto service centre faces the backyards of Tweedsmuir Avenue homes.

“The original plans included the entire side wall of the building to have yellow paint above the doors. Staff worked with the applicant to come up with a compromise that allowed for their company colours to be included, but limited the location to only a portion of the side wall,” Barnett stated.

“It should also be noted that under the Ontario Planning Act and Ontario Building Code municipalities do not have the authority to regulate the colour of building materials used on commercial buildings.”

Barnett added the applicant is required to plant a tree along the lot line to “help visually reduce the impacts of the commercial building on the residential lots.”

In a response emailed to Barnett, planning director Steve Robichaud, planning and economic development department spokesperson Marie Fitzpatrick and local city councillor Arlene VanderBeek, Dolson stated: “The compromise that was negotiated with the applicants still represents approximately 60 square metres of blazing yellow siding that is visible from every vantage point in our backyard and 50 per cent of the rooms in our house.”

Dolson said his ultimate goal is to reach an agreement with Beverly Tire, supported by the city, to change the siding colour to grey on the side of the building facing backyards of Tweedsmuir Avenue. Dolson and Barnett are planning to meet.

“A representative from Beverly Tire has already contacted me in person and has offered to work with the city … to try and come up with a resolution. I am optimistic that this collaborative approach can result in a solution acceptable to all stakeholders,” Dolson said.

He also has concerns about noise impacts and noted once the service centre starts operating neighbours can complain to bylaw enforcement.

“Who wants to do that the rest of their life,” Dolson said.

He suggested the city planning department and Beverly Tire missed an opportunity to collaborate with the community during the past four years – though he acknowledged they are communicating now.

“I’d rather see it at the front end,” he said.

Beverly Tire’s parent company, Benson Group of Cornwall, bought the former Delta Auto Service Centre at 89 Osler Dr. in December 2014 following a formal consultation with city of Hamilton planners about its proposal for the site.

In 2017, the company applied for and received three minor variances to permit construction of the two-storey service centre with up to eight service bays.