Hamilton to examine policies through diversity lens

News Mar 03, 2019 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

When Brad Clark tried to enter Hamilton’s council chambers a few years ago, he faced unusual resistance.

Because of his arthritis, he was using a cane, and trying to push open the heavy glass doors was sometimes too much for the Stoney Creek councillor.

Flamborough Coun. Robert Pasuta, frustrated at seeing his colleague struggle to simply open the door, told councillors that something had to be done to replace the doors so that everybody could easily enter the council chambers.

Even though the cost was in the thousands, the city installed accessible doors that slid open.

Clark remembered Pasuta’s support to make the council chambers accessible as he supported Mayor Fred Eisenberger’s motion to use an “equity, diversity and inclusion lens” to all decisions that are made by city departments.

“No one realized that folks who were struggling with disabilities were having a challenge getting through the doors because they weren’t experiencing it and they didn’t see it,” Clark told councillors.

Although the motion was only to establish an equity, diversity and inclusion lens on housing and homelessness, Eisenberger said it should be implemented throughout the city departments.

“It’s a good start on the housing front,” said Eisenberger. “We really need to do it across the organization.”

The mayor said his office has created an equity and inclusion handbook that had been in production for the last year to improve diversity throughout the city.

Councillors Nrinder Nann and Maureen Wilson both recently referenced diversity when they criticized how the city was selecting its new city manager. They both said any selection process should include viewing it through a diversity and equity lens.

Nann prompted the motion initially when she wanted to establish a gender lens for housing in Hamilton.

“I’m thrilled to see this motion come forward,” said Nann. “We have an opportunity here as a city to say that we are willing to look at ourselves warts and all.”

She said residents in her ward have been calling on the city to implement an inclusivity lens for years. Nann said the motion is an opportunity to say to “our community, we heard you.”

The motion also includes inviting experts on equity and diversity to a summit the city will host at a later date. The cost is expected to be about $5,000.

Hamilton adopts equity, diversity lens for all city decision-making policies

News Mar 03, 2019 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

When Brad Clark tried to enter Hamilton’s council chambers a few years ago, he faced unusual resistance.

Because of his arthritis, he was using a cane, and trying to push open the heavy glass doors was sometimes too much for the Stoney Creek councillor.

Flamborough Coun. Robert Pasuta, frustrated at seeing his colleague struggle to simply open the door, told councillors that something had to be done to replace the doors so that everybody could easily enter the council chambers.

Even though the cost was in the thousands, the city installed accessible doors that slid open.

Clark remembered Pasuta’s support to make the council chambers accessible as he supported Mayor Fred Eisenberger’s motion to use an “equity, diversity and inclusion lens” to all decisions that are made by city departments.

“No one realized that folks who were struggling with disabilities were having a challenge getting through the doors because they weren’t experiencing it and they didn’t see it,” Clark told councillors.

Although the motion was only to establish an equity, diversity and inclusion lens on housing and homelessness, Eisenberger said it should be implemented throughout the city departments.

“It’s a good start on the housing front,” said Eisenberger. “We really need to do it across the organization.”

The mayor said his office has created an equity and inclusion handbook that had been in production for the last year to improve diversity throughout the city.

Councillors Nrinder Nann and Maureen Wilson both recently referenced diversity when they criticized how the city was selecting its new city manager. They both said any selection process should include viewing it through a diversity and equity lens.

Nann prompted the motion initially when she wanted to establish a gender lens for housing in Hamilton.

“I’m thrilled to see this motion come forward,” said Nann. “We have an opportunity here as a city to say that we are willing to look at ourselves warts and all.”

She said residents in her ward have been calling on the city to implement an inclusivity lens for years. Nann said the motion is an opportunity to say to “our community, we heard you.”

The motion also includes inviting experts on equity and diversity to a summit the city will host at a later date. The cost is expected to be about $5,000.

Hamilton adopts equity, diversity lens for all city decision-making policies

News Mar 03, 2019 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

When Brad Clark tried to enter Hamilton’s council chambers a few years ago, he faced unusual resistance.

Because of his arthritis, he was using a cane, and trying to push open the heavy glass doors was sometimes too much for the Stoney Creek councillor.

Flamborough Coun. Robert Pasuta, frustrated at seeing his colleague struggle to simply open the door, told councillors that something had to be done to replace the doors so that everybody could easily enter the council chambers.

Even though the cost was in the thousands, the city installed accessible doors that slid open.

Clark remembered Pasuta’s support to make the council chambers accessible as he supported Mayor Fred Eisenberger’s motion to use an “equity, diversity and inclusion lens” to all decisions that are made by city departments.

“No one realized that folks who were struggling with disabilities were having a challenge getting through the doors because they weren’t experiencing it and they didn’t see it,” Clark told councillors.

Although the motion was only to establish an equity, diversity and inclusion lens on housing and homelessness, Eisenberger said it should be implemented throughout the city departments.

“It’s a good start on the housing front,” said Eisenberger. “We really need to do it across the organization.”

The mayor said his office has created an equity and inclusion handbook that had been in production for the last year to improve diversity throughout the city.

Councillors Nrinder Nann and Maureen Wilson both recently referenced diversity when they criticized how the city was selecting its new city manager. They both said any selection process should include viewing it through a diversity and equity lens.

Nann prompted the motion initially when she wanted to establish a gender lens for housing in Hamilton.

“I’m thrilled to see this motion come forward,” said Nann. “We have an opportunity here as a city to say that we are willing to look at ourselves warts and all.”

She said residents in her ward have been calling on the city to implement an inclusivity lens for years. Nann said the motion is an opportunity to say to “our community, we heard you.”

The motion also includes inviting experts on equity and diversity to a summit the city will host at a later date. The cost is expected to be about $5,000.