Webster’s Falls shuttle keeping Christie Lake as home base

News Feb 22, 2019 by Richard Leitner hamiltonnews.com

Christie Lake is becoming the Hamilton Conservation Authority’s permanent base for a weekend shuttle service to Webster’s Falls during the peak visitor season.

Gord Costie, director of conservation areas services, said last year’s trial run redirected an estimated 15,000 vehicles away from Webster’s Falls, which closes its parking lots on weekends and holidays between May and the end of October.

Although fewer than the 16,000 cars in 2017, when the service ran from Mizener’s flea market on Highway 5, he said the Christie numbers are less precise because gate staff didn’t track visitors staying there and those headed to Webster’s Falls.

But Costie said Webster’s Falls drew 115,000 visitors last year and Christie is the ideal spot for the shuttle because it has ample parking, turning lanes off Highway 5 and experience with large crowds for the popular spring and fall antique shows.

The shuttle has also been “a huge step” in reducing the traffic congestion around Webster’s Falls that had neighbours up in arms, he said in a presentation to the authority’s conservation advisory board.

Costie said the authority will continue to work with the city on other ways to lessen the impact on Greensville, suggesting higher fines to discourage illegal parking in the area as a potential option.

A limited 2018 pilot bus service from Toronto that brought 430 passengers over 16 trips to Christie will also be expanded this year to reduce traffic, he said.

“I think we can do better and I think we will continue to see that curve continue in that manner,” Costie said.

Treasurer Neil McDougall said although the shuttle service costs about $100,000 per year to run, it remains profitable because of Christie’s entry fees — $15 per vehicle and driver, and $5 per passenger above the age of five.

“It’s not as profitable as just running our (Webster’s Falls) parking lots to the max, but we can’t do that and still be socially responsible,” he said.

 

Webster’s Falls shuttle keeping Christie Lake as home base

Service diverted 15,000 cars in 2018, conservation authority says

News Feb 22, 2019 by Richard Leitner hamiltonnews.com

Christie Lake is becoming the Hamilton Conservation Authority’s permanent base for a weekend shuttle service to Webster’s Falls during the peak visitor season.

Gord Costie, director of conservation areas services, said last year’s trial run redirected an estimated 15,000 vehicles away from Webster’s Falls, which closes its parking lots on weekends and holidays between May and the end of October.

Although fewer than the 16,000 cars in 2017, when the service ran from Mizener’s flea market on Highway 5, he said the Christie numbers are less precise because gate staff didn’t track visitors staying there and those headed to Webster’s Falls.

But Costie said Webster’s Falls drew 115,000 visitors last year and Christie is the ideal spot for the shuttle because it has ample parking, turning lanes off Highway 5 and experience with large crowds for the popular spring and fall antique shows.

It’s not as profitable as just running our (Webster’s Falls) parking lots to the max, but we can’t do that and still be socially responsible. — Neil McDougall

The shuttle has also been “a huge step” in reducing the traffic congestion around Webster’s Falls that had neighbours up in arms, he said in a presentation to the authority’s conservation advisory board.

Costie said the authority will continue to work with the city on other ways to lessen the impact on Greensville, suggesting higher fines to discourage illegal parking in the area as a potential option.

A limited 2018 pilot bus service from Toronto that brought 430 passengers over 16 trips to Christie will also be expanded this year to reduce traffic, he said.

“I think we can do better and I think we will continue to see that curve continue in that manner,” Costie said.

Treasurer Neil McDougall said although the shuttle service costs about $100,000 per year to run, it remains profitable because of Christie’s entry fees — $15 per vehicle and driver, and $5 per passenger above the age of five.

“It’s not as profitable as just running our (Webster’s Falls) parking lots to the max, but we can’t do that and still be socially responsible,” he said.

 

Webster’s Falls shuttle keeping Christie Lake as home base

Service diverted 15,000 cars in 2018, conservation authority says

News Feb 22, 2019 by Richard Leitner hamiltonnews.com

Christie Lake is becoming the Hamilton Conservation Authority’s permanent base for a weekend shuttle service to Webster’s Falls during the peak visitor season.

Gord Costie, director of conservation areas services, said last year’s trial run redirected an estimated 15,000 vehicles away from Webster’s Falls, which closes its parking lots on weekends and holidays between May and the end of October.

Although fewer than the 16,000 cars in 2017, when the service ran from Mizener’s flea market on Highway 5, he said the Christie numbers are less precise because gate staff didn’t track visitors staying there and those headed to Webster’s Falls.

But Costie said Webster’s Falls drew 115,000 visitors last year and Christie is the ideal spot for the shuttle because it has ample parking, turning lanes off Highway 5 and experience with large crowds for the popular spring and fall antique shows.

It’s not as profitable as just running our (Webster’s Falls) parking lots to the max, but we can’t do that and still be socially responsible. — Neil McDougall

The shuttle has also been “a huge step” in reducing the traffic congestion around Webster’s Falls that had neighbours up in arms, he said in a presentation to the authority’s conservation advisory board.

Costie said the authority will continue to work with the city on other ways to lessen the impact on Greensville, suggesting higher fines to discourage illegal parking in the area as a potential option.

A limited 2018 pilot bus service from Toronto that brought 430 passengers over 16 trips to Christie will also be expanded this year to reduce traffic, he said.

“I think we can do better and I think we will continue to see that curve continue in that manner,” Costie said.

Treasurer Neil McDougall said although the shuttle service costs about $100,000 per year to run, it remains profitable because of Christie’s entry fees — $15 per vehicle and driver, and $5 per passenger above the age of five.

“It’s not as profitable as just running our (Webster’s Falls) parking lots to the max, but we can’t do that and still be socially responsible,” he said.