Hamilton school board chairs agree hiring rules flawed

News Jan 31, 2019 by Richard Leitner hamiltonnews.com

The chair of Hamilton’s Catholic school board says it’s a “very good thing” the province is reviewing how permanent teachers are hired.

Pat Daly said  although his board has yet to take a formal position, it’s always had concerns about the restrictiveness of hiring rules set out in a 2012 regulation.

Now written into most teacher union contracts, the rules require a board to interview the five most senior long-term occasional teachers who apply.

While designed to increase transparency and fairness, critics say the rules shut out better occasional teachers with less seniority and permanent teachers from other boards.

“The regulation, as it is, clearly limits the ability of a school board or school to hire perhaps the most appropriate teacher for that class or school,” Daly said.

But Jeff Sorensen, president of the Hamilton public elementary teachers’ union, said the rules are fair, open and address concerns friends and relatives previously had an upper hand in getting hired.

“I think it gives people confidence that those teachers that have the most experience who are occasional teachers are becoming permanent teachers,” he said.

“The system that existed before didn’t necessarily hire the best teachers, either. When there’s nepotism, I don’t think that means you’re getting an objective hiring process.”

Public board chair Alex Johnstone said the rules have improved equity, but make it harder to hire teachers best suited for special education and subjects like art, music and languages.

She said any changes will be negotiated provincially during upcoming teacher contract-renewal talks and she hopes for a fix to another problem: students frequently lose a long-term occasional teacher who is filling in for a leave and gets hired for a permanent position elsewhere mid-year.

“It honours seniority but it creates the challenge of the student having multiple teachers throughout the school year,” Johnstone said.

“We want to find solutions that reduce the number of transitions because we know that it’s important for one teacher to be in front of the students in order to build relationships and to better get to know all of their students and their students’ learning needs.”

 

Hamilton school board chairs agree hiring rules flawed

Process fair and open, public elementary teachers’ union head says

News Jan 31, 2019 by Richard Leitner hamiltonnews.com

The chair of Hamilton’s Catholic school board says it’s a “very good thing” the province is reviewing how permanent teachers are hired.

Pat Daly said  although his board has yet to take a formal position, it’s always had concerns about the restrictiveness of hiring rules set out in a 2012 regulation.

Now written into most teacher union contracts, the rules require a board to interview the five most senior long-term occasional teachers who apply.

While designed to increase transparency and fairness, critics say the rules shut out better occasional teachers with less seniority and permanent teachers from other boards.

It honours seniority but it creates the challenge of the student having multiple teachers throughout the school year. — Alex Johnstone

“The regulation, as it is, clearly limits the ability of a school board or school to hire perhaps the most appropriate teacher for that class or school,” Daly said.

But Jeff Sorensen, president of the Hamilton public elementary teachers’ union, said the rules are fair, open and address concerns friends and relatives previously had an upper hand in getting hired.

“I think it gives people confidence that those teachers that have the most experience who are occasional teachers are becoming permanent teachers,” he said.

“The system that existed before didn’t necessarily hire the best teachers, either. When there’s nepotism, I don’t think that means you’re getting an objective hiring process.”

Public board chair Alex Johnstone said the rules have improved equity, but make it harder to hire teachers best suited for special education and subjects like art, music and languages.

She said any changes will be negotiated provincially during upcoming teacher contract-renewal talks and she hopes for a fix to another problem: students frequently lose a long-term occasional teacher who is filling in for a leave and gets hired for a permanent position elsewhere mid-year.

“It honours seniority but it creates the challenge of the student having multiple teachers throughout the school year,” Johnstone said.

“We want to find solutions that reduce the number of transitions because we know that it’s important for one teacher to be in front of the students in order to build relationships and to better get to know all of their students and their students’ learning needs.”

 

Hamilton school board chairs agree hiring rules flawed

Process fair and open, public elementary teachers’ union head says

News Jan 31, 2019 by Richard Leitner hamiltonnews.com

The chair of Hamilton’s Catholic school board says it’s a “very good thing” the province is reviewing how permanent teachers are hired.

Pat Daly said  although his board has yet to take a formal position, it’s always had concerns about the restrictiveness of hiring rules set out in a 2012 regulation.

Now written into most teacher union contracts, the rules require a board to interview the five most senior long-term occasional teachers who apply.

While designed to increase transparency and fairness, critics say the rules shut out better occasional teachers with less seniority and permanent teachers from other boards.

It honours seniority but it creates the challenge of the student having multiple teachers throughout the school year. — Alex Johnstone

“The regulation, as it is, clearly limits the ability of a school board or school to hire perhaps the most appropriate teacher for that class or school,” Daly said.

But Jeff Sorensen, president of the Hamilton public elementary teachers’ union, said the rules are fair, open and address concerns friends and relatives previously had an upper hand in getting hired.

“I think it gives people confidence that those teachers that have the most experience who are occasional teachers are becoming permanent teachers,” he said.

“The system that existed before didn’t necessarily hire the best teachers, either. When there’s nepotism, I don’t think that means you’re getting an objective hiring process.”

Public board chair Alex Johnstone said the rules have improved equity, but make it harder to hire teachers best suited for special education and subjects like art, music and languages.

She said any changes will be negotiated provincially during upcoming teacher contract-renewal talks and she hopes for a fix to another problem: students frequently lose a long-term occasional teacher who is filling in for a leave and gets hired for a permanent position elsewhere mid-year.

“It honours seniority but it creates the challenge of the student having multiple teachers throughout the school year,” Johnstone said.

“We want to find solutions that reduce the number of transitions because we know that it’s important for one teacher to be in front of the students in order to build relationships and to better get to know all of their students and their students’ learning needs.”