Hamilton public school board to audit hiring practices

News Jan 11, 2019 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton’s public school board is enlisting an outside consultant to audit its hiring practices — as part of efforts to ensure that teachers, caretakers and other staff better reflect the changing face of its 49,600 students.

Jamie Nunn, superintendent of human resources, said that the board will also work with local immigrant settlement agencies to clarify the legislative requirements for people who have a teaching degree from another country and want to apply here.

The two measures build on other recent initiatives, he said, including a review with the help of an equity and inclusion consultant last June that led to more flexibility on the timing and location of job interviews.

Work with the board’s new human rights and equity officer also prompted recruitment staff to attend job fairs at the Six Nations of the Grand River and Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation reserves for the first time, he said.

Nunn said that the board doesn’t presently track the diversity of applicants or 6,600 existing employees, but hopes to get a better idea of the latter’s makeup through a voluntary workforce census this spring.

He said that the results will allow the board to see how reflective staffing is of Hamilton’s population, noting the city’s top countries of origin for new immigrants are now Syria, Iraq, the Philippines and India.

The latest federal census, for 2016, also found that 19 per cent of Hamiltonians were visible minorities — double the number two decades ago — while more than 12,000 people self-identified as Aboriginal, double the number 15 years ago, he said.

“We want to do better. We recognize the city is changing,” Nunn said in a presentation to trustees at their Jan. 7 human resources committee meeting. “We’ve had a lot of progress and shifts in our practices.”

Education director Manny Figueiredo said that working to ensure board staff reflects the city’s diversity will not only help meet equity goals sets by the Ministry of Education in 2017, but also improve student achievement.

As another example of how Hamilton has changed in recent years, Arabic is now the most commonly spoken language at home other than English — supplanting Italian, he said.

“If we’re going to close the achievement gap, research is clear when students see themselves represented not only in the curriculum but in the educators in front of them,” Figueiredo said.

“When they make that connection, they’re more likely to be successful.”

Board chair Alex Johnstone said that she looks forward to the results of the census, and welcomed the hiring of an equity consultant and the human rights officer to guide recruitment practices.

“Those are strong steps in the right direction,” she said.

Hamilton public school board to audit hiring practices

Goal to better reflect changing population, superintendent says

News Jan 11, 2019 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton’s public school board is enlisting an outside consultant to audit its hiring practices — as part of efforts to ensure that teachers, caretakers and other staff better reflect the changing face of its 49,600 students.

Jamie Nunn, superintendent of human resources, said that the board will also work with local immigrant settlement agencies to clarify the legislative requirements for people who have a teaching degree from another country and want to apply here.

The two measures build on other recent initiatives, he said, including a review with the help of an equity and inclusion consultant last June that led to more flexibility on the timing and location of job interviews.

Work with the board’s new human rights and equity officer also prompted recruitment staff to attend job fairs at the Six Nations of the Grand River and Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation reserves for the first time, he said.

"We want to do better. We recognize the city is changing." — Jamie Nunn

Nunn said that the board doesn’t presently track the diversity of applicants or 6,600 existing employees, but hopes to get a better idea of the latter’s makeup through a voluntary workforce census this spring.

He said that the results will allow the board to see how reflective staffing is of Hamilton’s population, noting the city’s top countries of origin for new immigrants are now Syria, Iraq, the Philippines and India.

The latest federal census, for 2016, also found that 19 per cent of Hamiltonians were visible minorities — double the number two decades ago — while more than 12,000 people self-identified as Aboriginal, double the number 15 years ago, he said.

“We want to do better. We recognize the city is changing,” Nunn said in a presentation to trustees at their Jan. 7 human resources committee meeting. “We’ve had a lot of progress and shifts in our practices.”

Education director Manny Figueiredo said that working to ensure board staff reflects the city’s diversity will not only help meet equity goals sets by the Ministry of Education in 2017, but also improve student achievement.

As another example of how Hamilton has changed in recent years, Arabic is now the most commonly spoken language at home other than English — supplanting Italian, he said.

“If we’re going to close the achievement gap, research is clear when students see themselves represented not only in the curriculum but in the educators in front of them,” Figueiredo said.

“When they make that connection, they’re more likely to be successful.”

Board chair Alex Johnstone said that she looks forward to the results of the census, and welcomed the hiring of an equity consultant and the human rights officer to guide recruitment practices.

“Those are strong steps in the right direction,” she said.

Hamilton public school board to audit hiring practices

Goal to better reflect changing population, superintendent says

News Jan 11, 2019 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton’s public school board is enlisting an outside consultant to audit its hiring practices — as part of efforts to ensure that teachers, caretakers and other staff better reflect the changing face of its 49,600 students.

Jamie Nunn, superintendent of human resources, said that the board will also work with local immigrant settlement agencies to clarify the legislative requirements for people who have a teaching degree from another country and want to apply here.

The two measures build on other recent initiatives, he said, including a review with the help of an equity and inclusion consultant last June that led to more flexibility on the timing and location of job interviews.

Work with the board’s new human rights and equity officer also prompted recruitment staff to attend job fairs at the Six Nations of the Grand River and Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation reserves for the first time, he said.

"We want to do better. We recognize the city is changing." — Jamie Nunn

Nunn said that the board doesn’t presently track the diversity of applicants or 6,600 existing employees, but hopes to get a better idea of the latter’s makeup through a voluntary workforce census this spring.

He said that the results will allow the board to see how reflective staffing is of Hamilton’s population, noting the city’s top countries of origin for new immigrants are now Syria, Iraq, the Philippines and India.

The latest federal census, for 2016, also found that 19 per cent of Hamiltonians were visible minorities — double the number two decades ago — while more than 12,000 people self-identified as Aboriginal, double the number 15 years ago, he said.

“We want to do better. We recognize the city is changing,” Nunn said in a presentation to trustees at their Jan. 7 human resources committee meeting. “We’ve had a lot of progress and shifts in our practices.”

Education director Manny Figueiredo said that working to ensure board staff reflects the city’s diversity will not only help meet equity goals sets by the Ministry of Education in 2017, but also improve student achievement.

As another example of how Hamilton has changed in recent years, Arabic is now the most commonly spoken language at home other than English — supplanting Italian, he said.

“If we’re going to close the achievement gap, research is clear when students see themselves represented not only in the curriculum but in the educators in front of them,” Figueiredo said.

“When they make that connection, they’re more likely to be successful.”

Board chair Alex Johnstone said that she looks forward to the results of the census, and welcomed the hiring of an equity consultant and the human rights officer to guide recruitment practices.

“Those are strong steps in the right direction,” she said.