Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson to focus on local issues

News Dec 04, 2018 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson may be stepping away from the Hamilton Police Services Board, but that doesn’t mean he won’t be busy during the coming council term.

Ferguson, the chair of the board, announced last month he would not serve another term.

“I asked not to be appointed,” said Ferguson. “I think it was pretty clear five years is enough. It’s a lot of responsibility; it’s a lot of work.”

Ferguson and Coun. Terry Whitehead both decided their time on the board had ended. There were replaced by councillors Chad Collins and Tom Jackson, who has served a number of times on the board.

Ferguson at times had a contentious tenure on the board. He served a three-week suspension as chair from December 2017 to January 2018, after breaching the code of conduct in on-air radio comments he made in 2017 on CHML.

Ferguson also endorsed the police service’s “carding” or street check policy, which has come under attack from local and provincial community groups.

But Ferguson still believes his time on the board saw improvement in the service. Ferguson oversaw the hiring of who he called the “best police chief in the province,” Eric Girt in 2016. Also during his tenure, the board hired a new deputy chief, Frank Bergen from the Toronto Police Service, and Anna Filice was named as the new Hamilton police chief administrative officer.

Ferguson is also proud of the long-sought construction of the new $25.8 million investigative services building on Wilson Street in Hamilton, which is scheduled to open by the end of 2019. The police services budget has also been trending downwards with some of the lowest increases over the past 20 years.

“I think I’ve done what I wanted to do,” he said. “It’s time to move on to something else.”

Ferguson, who was talking about his plans for the new term of council after taking part in Hamilton council’s inaugural meeting Dec. 3, possibly for the last time, said he will be focused on getting the Memorial Arts Centre in Ancaster completed. He also wants to see the completion of various public works projects in the town, including the redevelopment of Southcote Road.

The swearing-in ceremony for councillors, watched by about 300 people in the gallery and second-floor foyer of city hall, took less than an hour to complete. Afterwards, the new council, including four new councillors and one returning councillor, Brad Clark, were swarmed by family and friends who congratulated them on their election wins.  Ferguson held on to his grandson, Mason, as family members took photos.

Ferguson has been Ancaster’s council representative since being elected in 2006. Prior to announcing his re-election bid he suggested that the new term could be his last. Ferguson easily defeated four other candidates in the Oct. 22 municipal election. He takes over a changed Ward 12 that encompasses a large part of Flamborough, including the communities of Sheffield and Troy.

Even though he won’t be on the Hamilton Police Services Board, Ferguson will still be a member on about 23 standing committees and boards. Ferguson said he is interested in becoming more involved in the Hamilton Conservation Authority in an effort to control the number of people who use the trails, parks and waterfalls in the area. He said he will put his name in to become chair of the authority. The election of the chair could take place next spring.

“We have to make some changes, particularly around parking and make it safer,” he said. “Those trails are packed all the time.”


Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson to focus on environment rather than police during new council term

Councillor asks not to be re-appointed to police board

News Dec 04, 2018 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson may be stepping away from the Hamilton Police Services Board, but that doesn’t mean he won’t be busy during the coming council term.

Ferguson, the chair of the board, announced last month he would not serve another term.

“I asked not to be appointed,” said Ferguson. “I think it was pretty clear five years is enough. It’s a lot of responsibility; it’s a lot of work.”

Ferguson and Coun. Terry Whitehead both decided their time on the board had ended. There were replaced by councillors Chad Collins and Tom Jackson, who has served a number of times on the board.

Ferguson at times had a contentious tenure on the board. He served a three-week suspension as chair from December 2017 to January 2018, after breaching the code of conduct in on-air radio comments he made in 2017 on CHML.

Ferguson also endorsed the police service’s “carding” or street check policy, which has come under attack from local and provincial community groups.

But Ferguson still believes his time on the board saw improvement in the service. Ferguson oversaw the hiring of who he called the “best police chief in the province,” Eric Girt in 2016. Also during his tenure, the board hired a new deputy chief, Frank Bergen from the Toronto Police Service, and Anna Filice was named as the new Hamilton police chief administrative officer.

Ferguson is also proud of the long-sought construction of the new $25.8 million investigative services building on Wilson Street in Hamilton, which is scheduled to open by the end of 2019. The police services budget has also been trending downwards with some of the lowest increases over the past 20 years.

“I think I’ve done what I wanted to do,” he said. “It’s time to move on to something else.”

Ferguson, who was talking about his plans for the new term of council after taking part in Hamilton council’s inaugural meeting Dec. 3, possibly for the last time, said he will be focused on getting the Memorial Arts Centre in Ancaster completed. He also wants to see the completion of various public works projects in the town, including the redevelopment of Southcote Road.

The swearing-in ceremony for councillors, watched by about 300 people in the gallery and second-floor foyer of city hall, took less than an hour to complete. Afterwards, the new council, including four new councillors and one returning councillor, Brad Clark, were swarmed by family and friends who congratulated them on their election wins.  Ferguson held on to his grandson, Mason, as family members took photos.

Ferguson has been Ancaster’s council representative since being elected in 2006. Prior to announcing his re-election bid he suggested that the new term could be his last. Ferguson easily defeated four other candidates in the Oct. 22 municipal election. He takes over a changed Ward 12 that encompasses a large part of Flamborough, including the communities of Sheffield and Troy.

Even though he won’t be on the Hamilton Police Services Board, Ferguson will still be a member on about 23 standing committees and boards. Ferguson said he is interested in becoming more involved in the Hamilton Conservation Authority in an effort to control the number of people who use the trails, parks and waterfalls in the area. He said he will put his name in to become chair of the authority. The election of the chair could take place next spring.

“We have to make some changes, particularly around parking and make it safer,” he said. “Those trails are packed all the time.”


Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson to focus on environment rather than police during new council term

Councillor asks not to be re-appointed to police board

News Dec 04, 2018 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson may be stepping away from the Hamilton Police Services Board, but that doesn’t mean he won’t be busy during the coming council term.

Ferguson, the chair of the board, announced last month he would not serve another term.

“I asked not to be appointed,” said Ferguson. “I think it was pretty clear five years is enough. It’s a lot of responsibility; it’s a lot of work.”

Ferguson and Coun. Terry Whitehead both decided their time on the board had ended. There were replaced by councillors Chad Collins and Tom Jackson, who has served a number of times on the board.

Ferguson at times had a contentious tenure on the board. He served a three-week suspension as chair from December 2017 to January 2018, after breaching the code of conduct in on-air radio comments he made in 2017 on CHML.

Ferguson also endorsed the police service’s “carding” or street check policy, which has come under attack from local and provincial community groups.

But Ferguson still believes his time on the board saw improvement in the service. Ferguson oversaw the hiring of who he called the “best police chief in the province,” Eric Girt in 2016. Also during his tenure, the board hired a new deputy chief, Frank Bergen from the Toronto Police Service, and Anna Filice was named as the new Hamilton police chief administrative officer.

Ferguson is also proud of the long-sought construction of the new $25.8 million investigative services building on Wilson Street in Hamilton, which is scheduled to open by the end of 2019. The police services budget has also been trending downwards with some of the lowest increases over the past 20 years.

“I think I’ve done what I wanted to do,” he said. “It’s time to move on to something else.”

Ferguson, who was talking about his plans for the new term of council after taking part in Hamilton council’s inaugural meeting Dec. 3, possibly for the last time, said he will be focused on getting the Memorial Arts Centre in Ancaster completed. He also wants to see the completion of various public works projects in the town, including the redevelopment of Southcote Road.

The swearing-in ceremony for councillors, watched by about 300 people in the gallery and second-floor foyer of city hall, took less than an hour to complete. Afterwards, the new council, including four new councillors and one returning councillor, Brad Clark, were swarmed by family and friends who congratulated them on their election wins.  Ferguson held on to his grandson, Mason, as family members took photos.

Ferguson has been Ancaster’s council representative since being elected in 2006. Prior to announcing his re-election bid he suggested that the new term could be his last. Ferguson easily defeated four other candidates in the Oct. 22 municipal election. He takes over a changed Ward 12 that encompasses a large part of Flamborough, including the communities of Sheffield and Troy.

Even though he won’t be on the Hamilton Police Services Board, Ferguson will still be a member on about 23 standing committees and boards. Ferguson said he is interested in becoming more involved in the Hamilton Conservation Authority in an effort to control the number of people who use the trails, parks and waterfalls in the area. He said he will put his name in to become chair of the authority. The election of the chair could take place next spring.

“We have to make some changes, particularly around parking and make it safer,” he said. “Those trails are packed all the time.”