Canadian Minister Jean Yves-Duclos announces $2.2 billion boost to homelessness funding

News Nov 05, 2018 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Canadian government will allow “grassroots” anti-poverty organizations to develop plans to reduce homelessness in a more flexible manner to receive the necessary funding as part of its revamped homelessness strategy introduced in June.

Federal Minister of Families, Children and Social Development Jean-Yves Duclos told 1,300 delegates at the Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness conference at the Hamilton Convention Centre, Nov. 5 Canada will provide $2.2 billion over 10 years to reduce homelessness.

The funding comes from the federal government’s $40 billion Reaching Home: Canada’s Homelessness Strategy, which plans to reduce homelessness by at least 50 per cent over the next decade. Funding will be doubled to over 60 designated communities, including Hamilton, to $237 million annually starting in 2021-22, an increase from the base funding of $119.3 million in 2015-16.

The federal government is projecting to find homes for 160,000 people over the next nine years.

Reaching Home, said Duclos, is Canada’s first-ever national housing strategy. Coupled with the federal government’s poverty reduction plan (that was unveiled in August), Reaching Home is projected to build 100,000 new housing units and fix about 300,000 existing housing units.

Duclos also touted the proposed, new Canada housing benefit the federal government seeks to announce in 2020, which will assist 300,000 families. The idea is for families to receive direct support from the federal government, he said. The average allotment is projected to be about $2,500, he said.

“Reaching Home, I know, will be transformational,” said Duclos. “The funding will now be more flexible, adapted to local priorities, local conditions.”

He said federal funding to the existing 61 designated communities across the country, such as Guelph, St. Catharines, Peel Region, Toronto, Ottawa and Windsor, will not be interrupted during the transition to the new strategy that begins April 1, 2019.

He said the strategy will be “community-first,” which will incorporate “co-ordinated access as a program priority.

“That will help communities shift toward a more co-ordinated approach to addressing homelessness, sharing information, sharing services and sharing results,” he said.

The homelessness strategy will allow community groups, which will be required to provide an annual report detailing their outcomes to the public, to reach out to marginalized youth and assist women living in conditions of domestic violence, said Duclos, during a news conference.

The three-day National Conference to End Homelessness, from Nov. 5 to 7 is being held at the same time when the number of people homeless in Hamilton has dropped from 2016 levels.

The national 20,000 Homes Campaign the Point-in-Time Connection survey, conducted in April, found a 25 per cent drop in homelessness since 2016. The survey talked to 338 individuals and 48 families.

Hamilton officials site the increase in provincial and federal funding as part of the reason for the decrease in homelessness. Hamilton councillors also approved spending $50 million over 10 years to build affordable housing as part of its strategy to fight poverty.

Hamilton East-Stoney Creek Liberal MP Bob Bratina is hopeful his government’s homelessness strategy will achieve the necessary results to reduce homelessness. While Hamilton’s mayor in 2010, he discovered that about 10 per cent of the student population at Sir. John A. Macdonald High School was homeless.

“(Homelessness) is complex,” he said. “We want to see structures built. But we also want to see programs in place to guide people away from the distress and crisis they are in and into a more stable life. It is not simply about a roof.”

Duclos also addressed the high levels of Indigenous Canadians who are homeless. He said the federal government should be “doing a lot better” to reduce the numbers.

“It is particularly troubling,” he said.

Cindy Sue Montana McCormack, senior social planner with the social planning and research council applauded the 10-year time frame for the program.

She said it will allow community groups to develop a long-term plan to eradicate homelessness.

“It took us a long time to get to this situation,” she said. “It’s going to take us a long time to get out of this situation.”

But Steve Teekens, executive director of Na Me Res, said governments continue to under fund Indigenous programs to fight homelessness.

“They live up to expectations,” he said.

Meanwhile, Duclos said during the news conference the Ontario government needs to do its share to fight poverty and homelessness. The federal minister reiterated Canada won’t step in and keep the Basic Income pilot project alive after Ontario Premier Doug Ford moved to eliminate the project soon after being elected. The project was created by the previous Liberal government and was expected to cost $150 million over three years. Single people would receive up to $16,989 under the program, and couples could get as much as $24,027 annually.

The project, created last April, had 4,000 people enrolled, including 1,000 people from Hamilton.

“The federal government is not the one that decides how social assistance programs are run by provinces and territories,” said Duclos. “We would be delighted if the province would change its mind.”

He said “Ontario will have to do more” as part of a provincial-federal poverty reduction strategy that was signed in August where all governments committed to “reduce poverty to historically low levels.”

The plan calls for a 20 per cent reduction in poverty by 2020 and 50 per cent reduction in poverty by 2030.

Canadian Minister Jean-Yves-Duclos says government's homelessness strategy will be "transformational"

News Nov 05, 2018 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Canadian government will allow “grassroots” anti-poverty organizations to develop plans to reduce homelessness in a more flexible manner to receive the necessary funding as part of its revamped homelessness strategy introduced in June.

Federal Minister of Families, Children and Social Development Jean-Yves Duclos told 1,300 delegates at the Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness conference at the Hamilton Convention Centre, Nov. 5 Canada will provide $2.2 billion over 10 years to reduce homelessness.

The funding comes from the federal government’s $40 billion Reaching Home: Canada’s Homelessness Strategy, which plans to reduce homelessness by at least 50 per cent over the next decade. Funding will be doubled to over 60 designated communities, including Hamilton, to $237 million annually starting in 2021-22, an increase from the base funding of $119.3 million in 2015-16.

The federal government is projecting to find homes for 160,000 people over the next nine years.

Reaching Home, said Duclos, is Canada’s first-ever national housing strategy. Coupled with the federal government’s poverty reduction plan (that was unveiled in August), Reaching Home is projected to build 100,000 new housing units and fix about 300,000 existing housing units.

Duclos also touted the proposed, new Canada housing benefit the federal government seeks to announce in 2020, which will assist 300,000 families. The idea is for families to receive direct support from the federal government, he said. The average allotment is projected to be about $2,500, he said.

“Reaching Home, I know, will be transformational,” said Duclos. “The funding will now be more flexible, adapted to local priorities, local conditions.”

He said federal funding to the existing 61 designated communities across the country, such as Guelph, St. Catharines, Peel Region, Toronto, Ottawa and Windsor, will not be interrupted during the transition to the new strategy that begins April 1, 2019.

He said the strategy will be “community-first,” which will incorporate “co-ordinated access as a program priority.

“That will help communities shift toward a more co-ordinated approach to addressing homelessness, sharing information, sharing services and sharing results,” he said.

The homelessness strategy will allow community groups, which will be required to provide an annual report detailing their outcomes to the public, to reach out to marginalized youth and assist women living in conditions of domestic violence, said Duclos, during a news conference.

The three-day National Conference to End Homelessness, from Nov. 5 to 7 is being held at the same time when the number of people homeless in Hamilton has dropped from 2016 levels.

The national 20,000 Homes Campaign the Point-in-Time Connection survey, conducted in April, found a 25 per cent drop in homelessness since 2016. The survey talked to 338 individuals and 48 families.

Hamilton officials site the increase in provincial and federal funding as part of the reason for the decrease in homelessness. Hamilton councillors also approved spending $50 million over 10 years to build affordable housing as part of its strategy to fight poverty.

Hamilton East-Stoney Creek Liberal MP Bob Bratina is hopeful his government’s homelessness strategy will achieve the necessary results to reduce homelessness. While Hamilton’s mayor in 2010, he discovered that about 10 per cent of the student population at Sir. John A. Macdonald High School was homeless.

“(Homelessness) is complex,” he said. “We want to see structures built. But we also want to see programs in place to guide people away from the distress and crisis they are in and into a more stable life. It is not simply about a roof.”

Duclos also addressed the high levels of Indigenous Canadians who are homeless. He said the federal government should be “doing a lot better” to reduce the numbers.

“It is particularly troubling,” he said.

Cindy Sue Montana McCormack, senior social planner with the social planning and research council applauded the 10-year time frame for the program.

She said it will allow community groups to develop a long-term plan to eradicate homelessness.

“It took us a long time to get to this situation,” she said. “It’s going to take us a long time to get out of this situation.”

But Steve Teekens, executive director of Na Me Res, said governments continue to under fund Indigenous programs to fight homelessness.

“They live up to expectations,” he said.

Meanwhile, Duclos said during the news conference the Ontario government needs to do its share to fight poverty and homelessness. The federal minister reiterated Canada won’t step in and keep the Basic Income pilot project alive after Ontario Premier Doug Ford moved to eliminate the project soon after being elected. The project was created by the previous Liberal government and was expected to cost $150 million over three years. Single people would receive up to $16,989 under the program, and couples could get as much as $24,027 annually.

The project, created last April, had 4,000 people enrolled, including 1,000 people from Hamilton.

“The federal government is not the one that decides how social assistance programs are run by provinces and territories,” said Duclos. “We would be delighted if the province would change its mind.”

He said “Ontario will have to do more” as part of a provincial-federal poverty reduction strategy that was signed in August where all governments committed to “reduce poverty to historically low levels.”

The plan calls for a 20 per cent reduction in poverty by 2020 and 50 per cent reduction in poverty by 2030.

Canadian Minister Jean-Yves-Duclos says government's homelessness strategy will be "transformational"

News Nov 05, 2018 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Canadian government will allow “grassroots” anti-poverty organizations to develop plans to reduce homelessness in a more flexible manner to receive the necessary funding as part of its revamped homelessness strategy introduced in June.

Federal Minister of Families, Children and Social Development Jean-Yves Duclos told 1,300 delegates at the Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness conference at the Hamilton Convention Centre, Nov. 5 Canada will provide $2.2 billion over 10 years to reduce homelessness.

The funding comes from the federal government’s $40 billion Reaching Home: Canada’s Homelessness Strategy, which plans to reduce homelessness by at least 50 per cent over the next decade. Funding will be doubled to over 60 designated communities, including Hamilton, to $237 million annually starting in 2021-22, an increase from the base funding of $119.3 million in 2015-16.

The federal government is projecting to find homes for 160,000 people over the next nine years.

Reaching Home, said Duclos, is Canada’s first-ever national housing strategy. Coupled with the federal government’s poverty reduction plan (that was unveiled in August), Reaching Home is projected to build 100,000 new housing units and fix about 300,000 existing housing units.

Duclos also touted the proposed, new Canada housing benefit the federal government seeks to announce in 2020, which will assist 300,000 families. The idea is for families to receive direct support from the federal government, he said. The average allotment is projected to be about $2,500, he said.

“Reaching Home, I know, will be transformational,” said Duclos. “The funding will now be more flexible, adapted to local priorities, local conditions.”

He said federal funding to the existing 61 designated communities across the country, such as Guelph, St. Catharines, Peel Region, Toronto, Ottawa and Windsor, will not be interrupted during the transition to the new strategy that begins April 1, 2019.

He said the strategy will be “community-first,” which will incorporate “co-ordinated access as a program priority.

“That will help communities shift toward a more co-ordinated approach to addressing homelessness, sharing information, sharing services and sharing results,” he said.

The homelessness strategy will allow community groups, which will be required to provide an annual report detailing their outcomes to the public, to reach out to marginalized youth and assist women living in conditions of domestic violence, said Duclos, during a news conference.

The three-day National Conference to End Homelessness, from Nov. 5 to 7 is being held at the same time when the number of people homeless in Hamilton has dropped from 2016 levels.

The national 20,000 Homes Campaign the Point-in-Time Connection survey, conducted in April, found a 25 per cent drop in homelessness since 2016. The survey talked to 338 individuals and 48 families.

Hamilton officials site the increase in provincial and federal funding as part of the reason for the decrease in homelessness. Hamilton councillors also approved spending $50 million over 10 years to build affordable housing as part of its strategy to fight poverty.

Hamilton East-Stoney Creek Liberal MP Bob Bratina is hopeful his government’s homelessness strategy will achieve the necessary results to reduce homelessness. While Hamilton’s mayor in 2010, he discovered that about 10 per cent of the student population at Sir. John A. Macdonald High School was homeless.

“(Homelessness) is complex,” he said. “We want to see structures built. But we also want to see programs in place to guide people away from the distress and crisis they are in and into a more stable life. It is not simply about a roof.”

Duclos also addressed the high levels of Indigenous Canadians who are homeless. He said the federal government should be “doing a lot better” to reduce the numbers.

“It is particularly troubling,” he said.

Cindy Sue Montana McCormack, senior social planner with the social planning and research council applauded the 10-year time frame for the program.

She said it will allow community groups to develop a long-term plan to eradicate homelessness.

“It took us a long time to get to this situation,” she said. “It’s going to take us a long time to get out of this situation.”

But Steve Teekens, executive director of Na Me Res, said governments continue to under fund Indigenous programs to fight homelessness.

“They live up to expectations,” he said.

Meanwhile, Duclos said during the news conference the Ontario government needs to do its share to fight poverty and homelessness. The federal minister reiterated Canada won’t step in and keep the Basic Income pilot project alive after Ontario Premier Doug Ford moved to eliminate the project soon after being elected. The project was created by the previous Liberal government and was expected to cost $150 million over three years. Single people would receive up to $16,989 under the program, and couples could get as much as $24,027 annually.

The project, created last April, had 4,000 people enrolled, including 1,000 people from Hamilton.

“The federal government is not the one that decides how social assistance programs are run by provinces and territories,” said Duclos. “We would be delighted if the province would change its mind.”

He said “Ontario will have to do more” as part of a provincial-federal poverty reduction strategy that was signed in August where all governments committed to “reduce poverty to historically low levels.”

The plan calls for a 20 per cent reduction in poverty by 2020 and 50 per cent reduction in poverty by 2030.