Dundas Little Theatre's 200th show must go on

News Oct 19, 2018 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

The saying goes, 'The show must go on' and that's the case for Dundas Little Theatre as it prepares to launch its 2018-19 season with the 200th performance of its history — despite inconveniences from delayed completion of the J.L. Grightmire Arena expansion and renovations next door.

While they haven't been displaced from the facility, Garstin Centre for the Arts at 37 Market St. S., like local hockey clubs displaced from the arena, the theatre group is also affected, with entrances cut off by construction fencing and complete loss of the shared parking lot.

"We persevere," said theatre treasurer Peter Lloyd, who also performs in The Seagull by Anton Chekhov, opening Oct. 26 and running until Nov. 11.

"We're open for business. We've still got a home. It's hard to get in, but we're not out on the street like our friends next door."

Patrons must enter and exit the theatre through the temporary entrance usually only used by cast and crew, facing Market Street, while every other door is inaccessible during ongoing construction.

The little theatre faced a similar situation for part of its season last year — but still had access to part of the parking lot. Now the parking lot is completely closed, permitting no on-site parking, with no timeline for it to reopen. Paving had not even started by Oct. 17.

The parking lot was supposed to be repaved by July 31 with the entire arena project completed by Sept. 7 — more than a month before the theatre season began. But delays have seen completion pushed back to an undetermined date. Some estimates put completion in the new year.

"We all looked forward to the permanent solution of the newly paved parking lot promised for August," Lloyd said. "Access to the building and performances is worse than last year, if that is possible. We understand that there are many problems with the arena project, but paving the parking lot would solve a big problem."

The volunteer amateur theatre company is advising audience members to give themselves at least an extra 15 minutes if planning to drive to the October and November performances — as it may take time to locate available street parking in the area.

"It's tough for the neighbours," Lloyd said. "We become a bad neighbour for three weeks."

Dan McKinnon, the city's general manager of public works, said he visited the Grightmire Arena construction site on Oct. 18 to meet with general contractor Century Group and discuss ways to get the project back on track.

"I have asked my staff for a detailed summary of the project to date, and am personally reviewing it with the general contractor," McKinnon said. "My goal will be to develop a construction schedule that I believe is achievable and realistic. Once I am satisfied with the plan and we have a better idea of how Grightmire will be completed, we will be distributing that information to our council, neighbourhood stakeholders and the media."

Robyn Ellis, the city's manager of strategic planning, said the city will work with stakeholders — including the Dundas Little Theatre — and plan to collaborate with them during the remainder of the construction.

Theatre vice-chair and facilities co-ordinator Jane Snider said she's asked city project manager Sam Gagarello to have Century Group clean up around the theatre and move the fence further from the temporary entrance in time for the Oct. 26 opening night.

Gagarello told Snider the contractor's site manager was on vacation, and there was no on-site contact for him to talk to.

"It just means we have to change the ways we do our business," Lloyd said.

But unlike contractors working on city projects, he pointed out, the theatre group sets a date for a performance and must meet that deadline.

"It doesn't matter if someone breaks a leg," he said.

According to the original contract tender, outdoor concrete works between the arena and theatre — and any work in the common parking lot — would be completed between June 1, 2018, and July 31, 2018. None of that work had started by mid-October.

For tickets to Dundas Little Theatre productions, call 905-627-5266 or visit Holden's Florist at 44 York Rd. in Dundas. The group's second production of the season, comedy God of Carnage runs Jan. 25 to Feb. 10 and is directed by Peter Lloyd.

Visit dundaslittletheatre.com for more information.

Dundas Little Theatre's 200th show must go on

Garstin Centre for the Arts affected by Grightmire Arena construction delays

News Oct 19, 2018 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

The saying goes, 'The show must go on' and that's the case for Dundas Little Theatre as it prepares to launch its 2018-19 season with the 200th performance of its history — despite inconveniences from delayed completion of the J.L. Grightmire Arena expansion and renovations next door.

While they haven't been displaced from the facility, Garstin Centre for the Arts at 37 Market St. S., like local hockey clubs displaced from the arena, the theatre group is also affected, with entrances cut off by construction fencing and complete loss of the shared parking lot.

"We persevere," said theatre treasurer Peter Lloyd, who also performs in The Seagull by Anton Chekhov, opening Oct. 26 and running until Nov. 11.

"We're open for business. We've still got a home. It's hard to get in, but we're not out on the street like our friends next door."

"My goal will be to develop a construction schedule that I believe is achievable and realistic."
Dan McKinnon, Hamilton director of public works

Patrons must enter and exit the theatre through the temporary entrance usually only used by cast and crew, facing Market Street, while every other door is inaccessible during ongoing construction.

The little theatre faced a similar situation for part of its season last year — but still had access to part of the parking lot. Now the parking lot is completely closed, permitting no on-site parking, with no timeline for it to reopen. Paving had not even started by Oct. 17.

The parking lot was supposed to be repaved by July 31 with the entire arena project completed by Sept. 7 — more than a month before the theatre season began. But delays have seen completion pushed back to an undetermined date. Some estimates put completion in the new year.

"We all looked forward to the permanent solution of the newly paved parking lot promised for August," Lloyd said. "Access to the building and performances is worse than last year, if that is possible. We understand that there are many problems with the arena project, but paving the parking lot would solve a big problem."

The volunteer amateur theatre company is advising audience members to give themselves at least an extra 15 minutes if planning to drive to the October and November performances — as it may take time to locate available street parking in the area.

"It's tough for the neighbours," Lloyd said. "We become a bad neighbour for three weeks."

Dan McKinnon, the city's general manager of public works, said he visited the Grightmire Arena construction site on Oct. 18 to meet with general contractor Century Group and discuss ways to get the project back on track.

"I have asked my staff for a detailed summary of the project to date, and am personally reviewing it with the general contractor," McKinnon said. "My goal will be to develop a construction schedule that I believe is achievable and realistic. Once I am satisfied with the plan and we have a better idea of how Grightmire will be completed, we will be distributing that information to our council, neighbourhood stakeholders and the media."

Robyn Ellis, the city's manager of strategic planning, said the city will work with stakeholders — including the Dundas Little Theatre — and plan to collaborate with them during the remainder of the construction.

Theatre vice-chair and facilities co-ordinator Jane Snider said she's asked city project manager Sam Gagarello to have Century Group clean up around the theatre and move the fence further from the temporary entrance in time for the Oct. 26 opening night.

Gagarello told Snider the contractor's site manager was on vacation, and there was no on-site contact for him to talk to.

"It just means we have to change the ways we do our business," Lloyd said.

But unlike contractors working on city projects, he pointed out, the theatre group sets a date for a performance and must meet that deadline.

"It doesn't matter if someone breaks a leg," he said.

According to the original contract tender, outdoor concrete works between the arena and theatre — and any work in the common parking lot — would be completed between June 1, 2018, and July 31, 2018. None of that work had started by mid-October.

For tickets to Dundas Little Theatre productions, call 905-627-5266 or visit Holden's Florist at 44 York Rd. in Dundas. The group's second production of the season, comedy God of Carnage runs Jan. 25 to Feb. 10 and is directed by Peter Lloyd.

Visit dundaslittletheatre.com for more information.

Dundas Little Theatre's 200th show must go on

Garstin Centre for the Arts affected by Grightmire Arena construction delays

News Oct 19, 2018 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

The saying goes, 'The show must go on' and that's the case for Dundas Little Theatre as it prepares to launch its 2018-19 season with the 200th performance of its history — despite inconveniences from delayed completion of the J.L. Grightmire Arena expansion and renovations next door.

While they haven't been displaced from the facility, Garstin Centre for the Arts at 37 Market St. S., like local hockey clubs displaced from the arena, the theatre group is also affected, with entrances cut off by construction fencing and complete loss of the shared parking lot.

"We persevere," said theatre treasurer Peter Lloyd, who also performs in The Seagull by Anton Chekhov, opening Oct. 26 and running until Nov. 11.

"We're open for business. We've still got a home. It's hard to get in, but we're not out on the street like our friends next door."

"My goal will be to develop a construction schedule that I believe is achievable and realistic."
Dan McKinnon, Hamilton director of public works

Patrons must enter and exit the theatre through the temporary entrance usually only used by cast and crew, facing Market Street, while every other door is inaccessible during ongoing construction.

The little theatre faced a similar situation for part of its season last year — but still had access to part of the parking lot. Now the parking lot is completely closed, permitting no on-site parking, with no timeline for it to reopen. Paving had not even started by Oct. 17.

The parking lot was supposed to be repaved by July 31 with the entire arena project completed by Sept. 7 — more than a month before the theatre season began. But delays have seen completion pushed back to an undetermined date. Some estimates put completion in the new year.

"We all looked forward to the permanent solution of the newly paved parking lot promised for August," Lloyd said. "Access to the building and performances is worse than last year, if that is possible. We understand that there are many problems with the arena project, but paving the parking lot would solve a big problem."

The volunteer amateur theatre company is advising audience members to give themselves at least an extra 15 minutes if planning to drive to the October and November performances — as it may take time to locate available street parking in the area.

"It's tough for the neighbours," Lloyd said. "We become a bad neighbour for three weeks."

Dan McKinnon, the city's general manager of public works, said he visited the Grightmire Arena construction site on Oct. 18 to meet with general contractor Century Group and discuss ways to get the project back on track.

"I have asked my staff for a detailed summary of the project to date, and am personally reviewing it with the general contractor," McKinnon said. "My goal will be to develop a construction schedule that I believe is achievable and realistic. Once I am satisfied with the plan and we have a better idea of how Grightmire will be completed, we will be distributing that information to our council, neighbourhood stakeholders and the media."

Robyn Ellis, the city's manager of strategic planning, said the city will work with stakeholders — including the Dundas Little Theatre — and plan to collaborate with them during the remainder of the construction.

Theatre vice-chair and facilities co-ordinator Jane Snider said she's asked city project manager Sam Gagarello to have Century Group clean up around the theatre and move the fence further from the temporary entrance in time for the Oct. 26 opening night.

Gagarello told Snider the contractor's site manager was on vacation, and there was no on-site contact for him to talk to.

"It just means we have to change the ways we do our business," Lloyd said.

But unlike contractors working on city projects, he pointed out, the theatre group sets a date for a performance and must meet that deadline.

"It doesn't matter if someone breaks a leg," he said.

According to the original contract tender, outdoor concrete works between the arena and theatre — and any work in the common parking lot — would be completed between June 1, 2018, and July 31, 2018. None of that work had started by mid-October.

For tickets to Dundas Little Theatre productions, call 905-627-5266 or visit Holden's Florist at 44 York Rd. in Dundas. The group's second production of the season, comedy God of Carnage runs Jan. 25 to Feb. 10 and is directed by Peter Lloyd.

Visit dundaslittletheatre.com for more information.