Mayor Eisenberger says annexing Waterdown a 'non-starter'

News Sep 21, 2018 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger is calling Burlington Mayor Rick Goldring’s proposal to annex Waterdown a “slap in the face” to Hamilton.

Eisenberger said in an interview at the Jitterbug Café in Waterdown, on Sept. 20, he didn’t know beforehand that Goldring would be proposing the idea to take over Waterdown and its exploding residential development to “alleviate growth pressures on downtown Burlington.”

The proposal prompted Hamilton’s planning committee to approve a motion requesting staff to update councillors on the “future growth potential” that is planned for Waterdown at its Sept. 19 meeting.

Eisenberger says he told a “sheepish” Goldring that the Waterdown annexation idea is a non-starter.

“He didn’t apologize,” said Eisenberger. “I think it was very unfortunate the way it was done. I think it was a slap in the face not only to Hamilton, but to his own council and to the regional council.”

Eisenberger said Goldring’s surprise announcement, without an approval from his own council, had more to do with Burlington politics since he is in a tough mayoral race with Marianne Meed Ward.

He said Burlington is trying to blame Ontario’s Places to Grow document, which encourages higher densities in urban areas, for forcing officials to allow highrise towers in the downtown.

“The City of Burlington didn’t have to put up 30-storey towers, much of them in their own downtown,” said Eisenberger.

Meanwhile, Eisenberger ticked off a laundry list of improvements the Waterdown area has received from Hamilton since amalgamation, including the Harry Howell Arena, the seniors centre on Highway 5, the Carlisle library, redevelopment of Memorial Hall, and various improvements to parks and roads.

Eisenberger also announced he will be pushing the province to establish a timeline to build the Highway 5 and Highway 6 interchange and will accelerate the land acquisition for the construction of the long-awaited east-west Waterdown bypass. About $18 million has been set aside for the eastern portion of the east-west corridor scheduled to be completed by the end of 2021.

The province is expected to pay about 75 per cent of the Highway 5 and 6 interchange, with Hamilton responsible for 25 per cent, or about $7.5 million.

“The need is great (for both projects),” said Eisenberger. “The safety issues are paramount. The consternation is growing. We need to get it done sooner. I will push hard on getting that completed in the next term of council.”

He said there are about a couple of pieces of land still be acquired by the city for the bypass project.

“I want to move on that,” he said.

Mayoral candidate Vito Sgro also weighed in on the controversy, calling on Burlington to “solve its problems inside its own borders and not be looking to disrupt a neighbourhood community.”

However, Sgro also said there are a number of disaffected Flamborough residents who believe Hamilton hasn’t helped their community enough.

He said under his plan to scrap the $1-billion light rail transit project, there will be enough funding to complete the Waterdown bypass and provide rapid bus service from Hamilton to Waterdown.

Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger calls idea to annex Waterdown a 'slap in the face'

News Sep 21, 2018 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger is calling Burlington Mayor Rick Goldring’s proposal to annex Waterdown a “slap in the face” to Hamilton.

Eisenberger said in an interview at the Jitterbug Café in Waterdown, on Sept. 20, he didn’t know beforehand that Goldring would be proposing the idea to take over Waterdown and its exploding residential development to “alleviate growth pressures on downtown Burlington.”

The proposal prompted Hamilton’s planning committee to approve a motion requesting staff to update councillors on the “future growth potential” that is planned for Waterdown at its Sept. 19 meeting.

Eisenberger says he told a “sheepish” Goldring that the Waterdown annexation idea is a non-starter.

“He didn’t apologize,” said Eisenberger. “I think it was very unfortunate the way it was done. I think it was a slap in the face not only to Hamilton, but to his own council and to the regional council.”

Eisenberger said Goldring’s surprise announcement, without an approval from his own council, had more to do with Burlington politics since he is in a tough mayoral race with Marianne Meed Ward.

He said Burlington is trying to blame Ontario’s Places to Grow document, which encourages higher densities in urban areas, for forcing officials to allow highrise towers in the downtown.

“The City of Burlington didn’t have to put up 30-storey towers, much of them in their own downtown,” said Eisenberger.

Meanwhile, Eisenberger ticked off a laundry list of improvements the Waterdown area has received from Hamilton since amalgamation, including the Harry Howell Arena, the seniors centre on Highway 5, the Carlisle library, redevelopment of Memorial Hall, and various improvements to parks and roads.

Eisenberger also announced he will be pushing the province to establish a timeline to build the Highway 5 and Highway 6 interchange and will accelerate the land acquisition for the construction of the long-awaited east-west Waterdown bypass. About $18 million has been set aside for the eastern portion of the east-west corridor scheduled to be completed by the end of 2021.

The province is expected to pay about 75 per cent of the Highway 5 and 6 interchange, with Hamilton responsible for 25 per cent, or about $7.5 million.

“The need is great (for both projects),” said Eisenberger. “The safety issues are paramount. The consternation is growing. We need to get it done sooner. I will push hard on getting that completed in the next term of council.”

He said there are about a couple of pieces of land still be acquired by the city for the bypass project.

“I want to move on that,” he said.

Mayoral candidate Vito Sgro also weighed in on the controversy, calling on Burlington to “solve its problems inside its own borders and not be looking to disrupt a neighbourhood community.”

However, Sgro also said there are a number of disaffected Flamborough residents who believe Hamilton hasn’t helped their community enough.

He said under his plan to scrap the $1-billion light rail transit project, there will be enough funding to complete the Waterdown bypass and provide rapid bus service from Hamilton to Waterdown.

Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger calls idea to annex Waterdown a 'slap in the face'

News Sep 21, 2018 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger is calling Burlington Mayor Rick Goldring’s proposal to annex Waterdown a “slap in the face” to Hamilton.

Eisenberger said in an interview at the Jitterbug Café in Waterdown, on Sept. 20, he didn’t know beforehand that Goldring would be proposing the idea to take over Waterdown and its exploding residential development to “alleviate growth pressures on downtown Burlington.”

The proposal prompted Hamilton’s planning committee to approve a motion requesting staff to update councillors on the “future growth potential” that is planned for Waterdown at its Sept. 19 meeting.

Eisenberger says he told a “sheepish” Goldring that the Waterdown annexation idea is a non-starter.

“He didn’t apologize,” said Eisenberger. “I think it was very unfortunate the way it was done. I think it was a slap in the face not only to Hamilton, but to his own council and to the regional council.”

Eisenberger said Goldring’s surprise announcement, without an approval from his own council, had more to do with Burlington politics since he is in a tough mayoral race with Marianne Meed Ward.

He said Burlington is trying to blame Ontario’s Places to Grow document, which encourages higher densities in urban areas, for forcing officials to allow highrise towers in the downtown.

“The City of Burlington didn’t have to put up 30-storey towers, much of them in their own downtown,” said Eisenberger.

Meanwhile, Eisenberger ticked off a laundry list of improvements the Waterdown area has received from Hamilton since amalgamation, including the Harry Howell Arena, the seniors centre on Highway 5, the Carlisle library, redevelopment of Memorial Hall, and various improvements to parks and roads.

Eisenberger also announced he will be pushing the province to establish a timeline to build the Highway 5 and Highway 6 interchange and will accelerate the land acquisition for the construction of the long-awaited east-west Waterdown bypass. About $18 million has been set aside for the eastern portion of the east-west corridor scheduled to be completed by the end of 2021.

The province is expected to pay about 75 per cent of the Highway 5 and 6 interchange, with Hamilton responsible for 25 per cent, or about $7.5 million.

“The need is great (for both projects),” said Eisenberger. “The safety issues are paramount. The consternation is growing. We need to get it done sooner. I will push hard on getting that completed in the next term of council.”

He said there are about a couple of pieces of land still be acquired by the city for the bypass project.

“I want to move on that,” he said.

Mayoral candidate Vito Sgro also weighed in on the controversy, calling on Burlington to “solve its problems inside its own borders and not be looking to disrupt a neighbourhood community.”

However, Sgro also said there are a number of disaffected Flamborough residents who believe Hamilton hasn’t helped their community enough.

He said under his plan to scrap the $1-billion light rail transit project, there will be enough funding to complete the Waterdown bypass and provide rapid bus service from Hamilton to Waterdown.