'Getting this right is a big job': Enforcing cannabis laws in Mississauga

News Sep 18, 2018 by Ali Raza Mississauga News

If you wanted to avoid second-hand smoke from someone smoking a joint at a bus stop … who would you call?

The consumption and production of cannabis will be legal in Canada on Oct. 17, 2018 and Mississauga residents have several burning questions about its use in their communities.

The News looked at the role of Peel Regional Police and the role of the city’s Compliance and Licensing Enforcement officers in various cases. When do you call the police and when do you submit a complaint to the city? Here are some answers.

An extensive report — the Municipal Guide to Cannabis Legalization — from the Federation of Canadian Municipalities outlines the rules and recommendations for cities and towns across the province for how to respond to legal cannabis.

“Getting this right is a big job,” FCM president Jenny Gerbasi wrote in the report. “Local governments will face significant new enforcement and operational challenges in the months and years ahead.”

Gerbasi continues by adding that the challenges aren’t restricted to policing. There is a challenge in developing a “world of bylaws” and business licensing rules that will require reviewing.

The guide additionally outlines the role of police and the role of bylaw enforcement.

In Mississauga, Peel Regional Police will be responsible for implementing drugged driving laws, including roadside testing of users suspected of smoking cannabis and driving. Illegal cannabis storefronts will be shut down and prosecuted, and any illegal production of the plant will be also be under police jurisdiction.

The specific details of how Peel police will successfully test users and give them penalties and fines are elusive.

“We are developing our plan to address the enforcement and detection,” Const. Akhil Mooken said.

Mississauga’s Compliance and Licensing Enforcement is responsible for responding to nuisance complaints and public consumption complaints.

So, if you want to avoid second-hand smoke from a user at a bus stop, you can contact the city’s bylaw enforcement, not the police.

“We anticipate many types of complaints including public smoking, odour, production, and retail sales,” CLE said in a statement to the News. “We are currently working on a cannabis fact sheet and FAQ that will be available on our website to inform residents where to direct specific complaints.”

Residents can also contact Mississauga’s bylaw enforcement by calling 311.

Other responsibilities from the city outside of bylaw enforcement include siting cannabis storefronts and municipal licensing.

Bylaws regarding cannabis production focus on preventing production on premises with conditions against building codes or safety standards like overloaded or bypassed electrical wiring or an unauthorized municipal water connection. The city will pass specific cannabis production related bylaws aimed at addressing building code, fire, and health and safety issues.

Residents can grow up to four plants per household, but the guide does not describe how this will be enforced by police.

“They don’t need to stay ‘under the radar’ of law enforcement,” the FCM guide reads for residents seeking to grow their own plants.

The Ontario Cannabis Act prohibits consumption in public places, work places, motor vehicles, and boats. The city is expecting the province to amend the Smoke Free Ontario Act to possibly prohibit smoking or vaping cannabis in public spaces or anywhere outside of a residence.

“We are awaiting further details from the Government of Ontario regarding the role that municipalities will have in regulating and enforcing new laws around cannabis,” Mississauga enforcement director Sam Rogers said.

'Getting this right is a big job': Enforcing cannabis laws in Mississauga

With new laws on the way for legal pot, who's in charge of what?

News Sep 18, 2018 by Ali Raza Mississauga News

If you wanted to avoid second-hand smoke from someone smoking a joint at a bus stop … who would you call?

The consumption and production of cannabis will be legal in Canada on Oct. 17, 2018 and Mississauga residents have several burning questions about its use in their communities.

The News looked at the role of Peel Regional Police and the role of the city’s Compliance and Licensing Enforcement officers in various cases. When do you call the police and when do you submit a complaint to the city? Here are some answers.

An extensive report — the Municipal Guide to Cannabis Legalization — from the Federation of Canadian Municipalities outlines the rules and recommendations for cities and towns across the province for how to respond to legal cannabis.

Related Content

“Getting this right is a big job,” FCM president Jenny Gerbasi wrote in the report. “Local governments will face significant new enforcement and operational challenges in the months and years ahead.”

Gerbasi continues by adding that the challenges aren’t restricted to policing. There is a challenge in developing a “world of bylaws” and business licensing rules that will require reviewing.

The guide additionally outlines the role of police and the role of bylaw enforcement.

In Mississauga, Peel Regional Police will be responsible for implementing drugged driving laws, including roadside testing of users suspected of smoking cannabis and driving. Illegal cannabis storefronts will be shut down and prosecuted, and any illegal production of the plant will be also be under police jurisdiction.

The specific details of how Peel police will successfully test users and give them penalties and fines are elusive.

“We are developing our plan to address the enforcement and detection,” Const. Akhil Mooken said.

Mississauga’s Compliance and Licensing Enforcement is responsible for responding to nuisance complaints and public consumption complaints.

So, if you want to avoid second-hand smoke from a user at a bus stop, you can contact the city’s bylaw enforcement, not the police.

“We anticipate many types of complaints including public smoking, odour, production, and retail sales,” CLE said in a statement to the News. “We are currently working on a cannabis fact sheet and FAQ that will be available on our website to inform residents where to direct specific complaints.”

Residents can also contact Mississauga’s bylaw enforcement by calling 311.

Other responsibilities from the city outside of bylaw enforcement include siting cannabis storefronts and municipal licensing.

Bylaws regarding cannabis production focus on preventing production on premises with conditions against building codes or safety standards like overloaded or bypassed electrical wiring or an unauthorized municipal water connection. The city will pass specific cannabis production related bylaws aimed at addressing building code, fire, and health and safety issues.

Residents can grow up to four plants per household, but the guide does not describe how this will be enforced by police.

“They don’t need to stay ‘under the radar’ of law enforcement,” the FCM guide reads for residents seeking to grow their own plants.

The Ontario Cannabis Act prohibits consumption in public places, work places, motor vehicles, and boats. The city is expecting the province to amend the Smoke Free Ontario Act to possibly prohibit smoking or vaping cannabis in public spaces or anywhere outside of a residence.

“We are awaiting further details from the Government of Ontario regarding the role that municipalities will have in regulating and enforcing new laws around cannabis,” Mississauga enforcement director Sam Rogers said.

'Getting this right is a big job': Enforcing cannabis laws in Mississauga

With new laws on the way for legal pot, who's in charge of what?

News Sep 18, 2018 by Ali Raza Mississauga News

If you wanted to avoid second-hand smoke from someone smoking a joint at a bus stop … who would you call?

The consumption and production of cannabis will be legal in Canada on Oct. 17, 2018 and Mississauga residents have several burning questions about its use in their communities.

The News looked at the role of Peel Regional Police and the role of the city’s Compliance and Licensing Enforcement officers in various cases. When do you call the police and when do you submit a complaint to the city? Here are some answers.

An extensive report — the Municipal Guide to Cannabis Legalization — from the Federation of Canadian Municipalities outlines the rules and recommendations for cities and towns across the province for how to respond to legal cannabis.

Related Content

“Getting this right is a big job,” FCM president Jenny Gerbasi wrote in the report. “Local governments will face significant new enforcement and operational challenges in the months and years ahead.”

Gerbasi continues by adding that the challenges aren’t restricted to policing. There is a challenge in developing a “world of bylaws” and business licensing rules that will require reviewing.

The guide additionally outlines the role of police and the role of bylaw enforcement.

In Mississauga, Peel Regional Police will be responsible for implementing drugged driving laws, including roadside testing of users suspected of smoking cannabis and driving. Illegal cannabis storefronts will be shut down and prosecuted, and any illegal production of the plant will be also be under police jurisdiction.

The specific details of how Peel police will successfully test users and give them penalties and fines are elusive.

“We are developing our plan to address the enforcement and detection,” Const. Akhil Mooken said.

Mississauga’s Compliance and Licensing Enforcement is responsible for responding to nuisance complaints and public consumption complaints.

So, if you want to avoid second-hand smoke from a user at a bus stop, you can contact the city’s bylaw enforcement, not the police.

“We anticipate many types of complaints including public smoking, odour, production, and retail sales,” CLE said in a statement to the News. “We are currently working on a cannabis fact sheet and FAQ that will be available on our website to inform residents where to direct specific complaints.”

Residents can also contact Mississauga’s bylaw enforcement by calling 311.

Other responsibilities from the city outside of bylaw enforcement include siting cannabis storefronts and municipal licensing.

Bylaws regarding cannabis production focus on preventing production on premises with conditions against building codes or safety standards like overloaded or bypassed electrical wiring or an unauthorized municipal water connection. The city will pass specific cannabis production related bylaws aimed at addressing building code, fire, and health and safety issues.

Residents can grow up to four plants per household, but the guide does not describe how this will be enforced by police.

“They don’t need to stay ‘under the radar’ of law enforcement,” the FCM guide reads for residents seeking to grow their own plants.

The Ontario Cannabis Act prohibits consumption in public places, work places, motor vehicles, and boats. The city is expecting the province to amend the Smoke Free Ontario Act to possibly prohibit smoking or vaping cannabis in public spaces or anywhere outside of a residence.

“We are awaiting further details from the Government of Ontario regarding the role that municipalities will have in regulating and enforcing new laws around cannabis,” Mississauga enforcement director Sam Rogers said.