Dundas turtle fencing to be extended along Cootes Drive

News Jul 05, 2018 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Fundraising has begun to extend a fence directing turtles, and other wildlife, under Cootes Drive and away from the road.

The Hamilton Conservation Foundation announced on June 29 that a decline in the provincial population of the Midland Painted Turtle resulted in the species being designated a species of special concern. According to the foundation, that means every turtle species in Ontario is on the list and adds a new urgency to extend Cootes Drive turtle fencing. A majority of turtles found in the area are apparently snapping turtles or midland painted turtles.

The low fencing blocks wildlife from getting onto the busy road, while access through underground culverts and under the Cootes Drive bridge at Spencer Creek remains open. The fence effectively directs wildlife to safe crossings under the road.

The foundation wants to raise $15,000 to complete the turtle fence project.

"Local populations in Cootes Paradise and Spencer Creek have faired better in recent years, thanks in part to the efforts of the Dundas Turtle Watch volunteer group and the Royal Botanical Gardens," a foundation press release stated.

After the Royal Botanical Gardens put up similar fencing along its northeast Cootes Drive property, the Hamilton Conservation Authority fenced its land on the south-west side of the road in 2016.

"While these fences have been successful in helping to reduce turtle fatalities on Cootes Drive, it has not eliminated them," the foundation press release stated.

Lesley McDonell, terrestrial ecologist at the conservation authority, said the organization is working with Dundas Turtle Watch to collect road mortality data along Cootes and other roads of concern.

"It is anticipated that wildlife road mortality will be reduced once fencing has been completed on the north and south side of the road," McDonell said.

She said the foundation's current fundraising effort will pay for another 500 metres of fencing, extending it to the next culvert down the road.

"This would take the fence west of Olympic Drive along Cootes Drive," McDonell said.

More than 400 metres of wildlife directional fencing already exists along Cootes Drive.

 


Dundas turtle fencing to be extended along Cootes Drive

Foundation aims to raise $15,000 to complete project

News Jul 05, 2018 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Fundraising has begun to extend a fence directing turtles, and other wildlife, under Cootes Drive and away from the road.

The Hamilton Conservation Foundation announced on June 29 that a decline in the provincial population of the Midland Painted Turtle resulted in the species being designated a species of special concern. According to the foundation, that means every turtle species in Ontario is on the list and adds a new urgency to extend Cootes Drive turtle fencing. A majority of turtles found in the area are apparently snapping turtles or midland painted turtles.

The low fencing blocks wildlife from getting onto the busy road, while access through underground culverts and under the Cootes Drive bridge at Spencer Creek remains open. The fence effectively directs wildlife to safe crossings under the road.

The foundation wants to raise $15,000 to complete the turtle fence project.

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"Local populations in Cootes Paradise and Spencer Creek have faired better in recent years, thanks in part to the efforts of the Dundas Turtle Watch volunteer group and the Royal Botanical Gardens," a foundation press release stated.

After the Royal Botanical Gardens put up similar fencing along its northeast Cootes Drive property, the Hamilton Conservation Authority fenced its land on the south-west side of the road in 2016.

"While these fences have been successful in helping to reduce turtle fatalities on Cootes Drive, it has not eliminated them," the foundation press release stated.

Lesley McDonell, terrestrial ecologist at the conservation authority, said the organization is working with Dundas Turtle Watch to collect road mortality data along Cootes and other roads of concern.

"It is anticipated that wildlife road mortality will be reduced once fencing has been completed on the north and south side of the road," McDonell said.

She said the foundation's current fundraising effort will pay for another 500 metres of fencing, extending it to the next culvert down the road.

"This would take the fence west of Olympic Drive along Cootes Drive," McDonell said.

More than 400 metres of wildlife directional fencing already exists along Cootes Drive.

 


Dundas turtle fencing to be extended along Cootes Drive

Foundation aims to raise $15,000 to complete project

News Jul 05, 2018 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Fundraising has begun to extend a fence directing turtles, and other wildlife, under Cootes Drive and away from the road.

The Hamilton Conservation Foundation announced on June 29 that a decline in the provincial population of the Midland Painted Turtle resulted in the species being designated a species of special concern. According to the foundation, that means every turtle species in Ontario is on the list and adds a new urgency to extend Cootes Drive turtle fencing. A majority of turtles found in the area are apparently snapping turtles or midland painted turtles.

The low fencing blocks wildlife from getting onto the busy road, while access through underground culverts and under the Cootes Drive bridge at Spencer Creek remains open. The fence effectively directs wildlife to safe crossings under the road.

The foundation wants to raise $15,000 to complete the turtle fence project.

Related Content

"Local populations in Cootes Paradise and Spencer Creek have faired better in recent years, thanks in part to the efforts of the Dundas Turtle Watch volunteer group and the Royal Botanical Gardens," a foundation press release stated.

After the Royal Botanical Gardens put up similar fencing along its northeast Cootes Drive property, the Hamilton Conservation Authority fenced its land on the south-west side of the road in 2016.

"While these fences have been successful in helping to reduce turtle fatalities on Cootes Drive, it has not eliminated them," the foundation press release stated.

Lesley McDonell, terrestrial ecologist at the conservation authority, said the organization is working with Dundas Turtle Watch to collect road mortality data along Cootes and other roads of concern.

"It is anticipated that wildlife road mortality will be reduced once fencing has been completed on the north and south side of the road," McDonell said.

She said the foundation's current fundraising effort will pay for another 500 metres of fencing, extending it to the next culvert down the road.

"This would take the fence west of Olympic Drive along Cootes Drive," McDonell said.

More than 400 metres of wildlife directional fencing already exists along Cootes Drive.