Waterdown's The Dream Centre has charges dropped in court

News Jun 12, 2018 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

The owners of Waterdown’s The Dream Centre and the business had a total of 14 charges related to alleged Building Code Act infractions stayed or dropped May 31 at Hamilton’s John Sopinka Courthouse.

The Dream Centre, represented in the legal proceedings as 1592797 Ontario Ltd., and co-owner Sarah Sordoni were each up on seven identical charges, stemming from 2015 renovations at The Dream Centre’s 66 Innovation Dr. property, which the city charged took place without a building permit. It also charged that the construction changed the building’s use without a permit.

The business has since moved its operations to 70 Innovation Dr., which has the proper zoning to allow the Dream Centre to operate.

Municipal prosecutor Nora Isak, who took over the file from prosecutor Geoffrey Tennant, withdrew the charges against Sordoni, and stayed those against the company May 31.

Defence lawyer John Nunziata said it’s great for The Dream Centre, co-owned by Sordoni and Derek Conorton, to put the charges behind them.

“It’s total vindication,” Nunziata said of the outcome.

Conorton said the court battle has taken time and money away from the business.

“There are thousands of happy kids that come through our doors weekly,” he said. “That’s all taken away from that.”

The case involved some legal wrangling, as the original charges misspelled Sordoni’s last name as Sardoni, as well as threats of a challenge under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms due to unnecessary delay on the part of the city.

The seven charges against the numbered company were arraigned April 6 in front of justice of the peace Ken Dechert. Defence lawyer Nunziata entered pleas of not guilty on the company’s behalf on all charges. Due to the arraignment, Isak stayed the charges against the company, rather than withdrawing them.

In deciding to stay the charges, the court heard that Isak had determined the delay on the part of the judicial system and prosecutor was in excess of 18 months, which would fail a Charter challenge.

Although Nunziata claimed an abuse of process and sought to bring contempt of court charges against Tennant, as the charges were stayed, no evidence on the matter was heard.

As a result of the more than 29 months the case had dragged on, leading to in excess of $100,000 in legal costs, Conorton and Sordoni said they anticipate bringing a civil suit against the city.

“It’s cost them a lot and all the suffering they’ve had to go through for close to three years,” said Nunziata. “This was totally mishandled.”

“It was obvious, at least a year ago, that those charges should have been dismissed.,” he continued. “I’m satisfied too, at some point they’re going to get compensation in a civil court.”

Waterdown's The Dream Centre has charges dropped in court

Alleged Building Code Act infractions took place in 2015

News Jun 12, 2018 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

The owners of Waterdown’s The Dream Centre and the business had a total of 14 charges related to alleged Building Code Act infractions stayed or dropped May 31 at Hamilton’s John Sopinka Courthouse.

The Dream Centre, represented in the legal proceedings as 1592797 Ontario Ltd., and co-owner Sarah Sordoni were each up on seven identical charges, stemming from 2015 renovations at The Dream Centre’s 66 Innovation Dr. property, which the city charged took place without a building permit. It also charged that the construction changed the building’s use without a permit.

The business has since moved its operations to 70 Innovation Dr., which has the proper zoning to allow the Dream Centre to operate.

Municipal prosecutor Nora Isak, who took over the file from prosecutor Geoffrey Tennant, withdrew the charges against Sordoni, and stayed those against the company May 31.

“It’s total vindication." — Lawyer John Nunziata

Defence lawyer John Nunziata said it’s great for The Dream Centre, co-owned by Sordoni and Derek Conorton, to put the charges behind them.

“It’s total vindication,” Nunziata said of the outcome.

Conorton said the court battle has taken time and money away from the business.

“There are thousands of happy kids that come through our doors weekly,” he said. “That’s all taken away from that.”

The case involved some legal wrangling, as the original charges misspelled Sordoni’s last name as Sardoni, as well as threats of a challenge under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms due to unnecessary delay on the part of the city.

The seven charges against the numbered company were arraigned April 6 in front of justice of the peace Ken Dechert. Defence lawyer Nunziata entered pleas of not guilty on the company’s behalf on all charges. Due to the arraignment, Isak stayed the charges against the company, rather than withdrawing them.

In deciding to stay the charges, the court heard that Isak had determined the delay on the part of the judicial system and prosecutor was in excess of 18 months, which would fail a Charter challenge.

Although Nunziata claimed an abuse of process and sought to bring contempt of court charges against Tennant, as the charges were stayed, no evidence on the matter was heard.

As a result of the more than 29 months the case had dragged on, leading to in excess of $100,000 in legal costs, Conorton and Sordoni said they anticipate bringing a civil suit against the city.

“It’s cost them a lot and all the suffering they’ve had to go through for close to three years,” said Nunziata. “This was totally mishandled.”

“It was obvious, at least a year ago, that those charges should have been dismissed.,” he continued. “I’m satisfied too, at some point they’re going to get compensation in a civil court.”

Waterdown's The Dream Centre has charges dropped in court

Alleged Building Code Act infractions took place in 2015

News Jun 12, 2018 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

The owners of Waterdown’s The Dream Centre and the business had a total of 14 charges related to alleged Building Code Act infractions stayed or dropped May 31 at Hamilton’s John Sopinka Courthouse.

The Dream Centre, represented in the legal proceedings as 1592797 Ontario Ltd., and co-owner Sarah Sordoni were each up on seven identical charges, stemming from 2015 renovations at The Dream Centre’s 66 Innovation Dr. property, which the city charged took place without a building permit. It also charged that the construction changed the building’s use without a permit.

The business has since moved its operations to 70 Innovation Dr., which has the proper zoning to allow the Dream Centre to operate.

Municipal prosecutor Nora Isak, who took over the file from prosecutor Geoffrey Tennant, withdrew the charges against Sordoni, and stayed those against the company May 31.

“It’s total vindication." — Lawyer John Nunziata

Defence lawyer John Nunziata said it’s great for The Dream Centre, co-owned by Sordoni and Derek Conorton, to put the charges behind them.

“It’s total vindication,” Nunziata said of the outcome.

Conorton said the court battle has taken time and money away from the business.

“There are thousands of happy kids that come through our doors weekly,” he said. “That’s all taken away from that.”

The case involved some legal wrangling, as the original charges misspelled Sordoni’s last name as Sardoni, as well as threats of a challenge under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms due to unnecessary delay on the part of the city.

The seven charges against the numbered company were arraigned April 6 in front of justice of the peace Ken Dechert. Defence lawyer Nunziata entered pleas of not guilty on the company’s behalf on all charges. Due to the arraignment, Isak stayed the charges against the company, rather than withdrawing them.

In deciding to stay the charges, the court heard that Isak had determined the delay on the part of the judicial system and prosecutor was in excess of 18 months, which would fail a Charter challenge.

Although Nunziata claimed an abuse of process and sought to bring contempt of court charges against Tennant, as the charges were stayed, no evidence on the matter was heard.

As a result of the more than 29 months the case had dragged on, leading to in excess of $100,000 in legal costs, Conorton and Sordoni said they anticipate bringing a civil suit against the city.

“It’s cost them a lot and all the suffering they’ve had to go through for close to three years,” said Nunziata. “This was totally mishandled.”

“It was obvious, at least a year ago, that those charges should have been dismissed.,” he continued. “I’m satisfied too, at some point they’re going to get compensation in a civil court.”