Hamilton councillors chicken out on hens study

News Apr 05, 2018 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Once again Hamilton councillors chickened out to study allowing hens in residential backyards.

The city’s planning committee voted 5-4 against a motion April 3 by Ward 2 Coun. Jason Farr to update a 2012 report to examine if it was feasible for residents to have hens in their yards.

The motion was prompted by Hamilton resident Christina Sousa’s appearance to the committee asking politicians to study the issue further. She said allowing hens in the backyard would provide families with fresh eggs each morning, eat any ticks in the area and provide fertilizer for the soil.

“It’s like any other animal. You keep them clean, collect the eggs every night, water and feed them just like any responsible pet owner,” said Sousa, who had chickens when she lived in Newmarket.

Sousa said in Guelph, which approved hens in their residents’ backyards, there are about 40 of them in the community with no complaints made to the city.

Flamborough Coun. Robert Pasuta, who is a working farmer, remained skeptical to the idea. He said hens attract diseases and vermin, and there are concerns about health issues.

Stoney Creek Coun. Doug Conley, a former councillor for the previous Stoney Creek City, said the municipality allowed hens in residential backyards and had to deal with constant complaints.

“We had nothing but problems,” he said. “I see nothing changing.”

Ward 3 Coun. Matthew Green was frustrated that suburban councillors were deciding what downtown residents should be allowed to do. He was willing to talk to residents in his ward if they were interested in establishing chicken coops.

In 2012 councillors rejected 9-6 a request from Farr to have staff examine if the city could legally license and regulate urban chickens. He also suggested a three-year pilot project allowing a limited number of residences in wards one and two to keep chickens in their backyards.

Other municipalities have approved the idea including Guelph, Kingston, Toronto, Brampton, Newmarket and Niagara Region.

Hamilton staff said chickens are allowed in Hamilton’s rural areas, but banned in urban sections of the city.

Farr argued his motion would provide an update to the past report on hens in backyards.

“A lot of our concerns have been — or will be — mitigated,” he said.

The recommendation will be discussed at Hamilton council’s April 11 meeting.

Hamilton councillors reject for 2nd time studying hens in backyards

News Apr 05, 2018 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Once again Hamilton councillors chickened out to study allowing hens in residential backyards.

The city’s planning committee voted 5-4 against a motion April 3 by Ward 2 Coun. Jason Farr to update a 2012 report to examine if it was feasible for residents to have hens in their yards.

The motion was prompted by Hamilton resident Christina Sousa’s appearance to the committee asking politicians to study the issue further. She said allowing hens in the backyard would provide families with fresh eggs each morning, eat any ticks in the area and provide fertilizer for the soil.

“It’s like any other animal. You keep them clean, collect the eggs every night, water and feed them just like any responsible pet owner,” said Sousa, who had chickens when she lived in Newmarket.

Sousa said in Guelph, which approved hens in their residents’ backyards, there are about 40 of them in the community with no complaints made to the city.

Flamborough Coun. Robert Pasuta, who is a working farmer, remained skeptical to the idea. He said hens attract diseases and vermin, and there are concerns about health issues.

Stoney Creek Coun. Doug Conley, a former councillor for the previous Stoney Creek City, said the municipality allowed hens in residential backyards and had to deal with constant complaints.

“We had nothing but problems,” he said. “I see nothing changing.”

Ward 3 Coun. Matthew Green was frustrated that suburban councillors were deciding what downtown residents should be allowed to do. He was willing to talk to residents in his ward if they were interested in establishing chicken coops.

In 2012 councillors rejected 9-6 a request from Farr to have staff examine if the city could legally license and regulate urban chickens. He also suggested a three-year pilot project allowing a limited number of residences in wards one and two to keep chickens in their backyards.

Other municipalities have approved the idea including Guelph, Kingston, Toronto, Brampton, Newmarket and Niagara Region.

Hamilton staff said chickens are allowed in Hamilton’s rural areas, but banned in urban sections of the city.

Farr argued his motion would provide an update to the past report on hens in backyards.

“A lot of our concerns have been — or will be — mitigated,” he said.

The recommendation will be discussed at Hamilton council’s April 11 meeting.

Hamilton councillors reject for 2nd time studying hens in backyards

News Apr 05, 2018 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Once again Hamilton councillors chickened out to study allowing hens in residential backyards.

The city’s planning committee voted 5-4 against a motion April 3 by Ward 2 Coun. Jason Farr to update a 2012 report to examine if it was feasible for residents to have hens in their yards.

The motion was prompted by Hamilton resident Christina Sousa’s appearance to the committee asking politicians to study the issue further. She said allowing hens in the backyard would provide families with fresh eggs each morning, eat any ticks in the area and provide fertilizer for the soil.

“It’s like any other animal. You keep them clean, collect the eggs every night, water and feed them just like any responsible pet owner,” said Sousa, who had chickens when she lived in Newmarket.

Sousa said in Guelph, which approved hens in their residents’ backyards, there are about 40 of them in the community with no complaints made to the city.

Flamborough Coun. Robert Pasuta, who is a working farmer, remained skeptical to the idea. He said hens attract diseases and vermin, and there are concerns about health issues.

Stoney Creek Coun. Doug Conley, a former councillor for the previous Stoney Creek City, said the municipality allowed hens in residential backyards and had to deal with constant complaints.

“We had nothing but problems,” he said. “I see nothing changing.”

Ward 3 Coun. Matthew Green was frustrated that suburban councillors were deciding what downtown residents should be allowed to do. He was willing to talk to residents in his ward if they were interested in establishing chicken coops.

In 2012 councillors rejected 9-6 a request from Farr to have staff examine if the city could legally license and regulate urban chickens. He also suggested a three-year pilot project allowing a limited number of residences in wards one and two to keep chickens in their backyards.

Other municipalities have approved the idea including Guelph, Kingston, Toronto, Brampton, Newmarket and Niagara Region.

Hamilton staff said chickens are allowed in Hamilton’s rural areas, but banned in urban sections of the city.

Farr argued his motion would provide an update to the past report on hens in backyards.

“A lot of our concerns have been — or will be — mitigated,” he said.

The recommendation will be discussed at Hamilton council’s April 11 meeting.