HWAD Tory candidate Ben Levitt wants new nomination

News Feb 13, 2018 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas provincial Progressive Conservative candidate Ben Levitt has requested the party organize a new nomination meeting before the June 7 election to restore his political reputation.

Levitt said he recently returned from a trip and learned the Tory party decided to hold new nomination meetings in two other ridings where the results were questioned.

“We want to clear my name and reputation,” said Levitt, 26, in an interview. “We won (the nomination). But questions are still lingering. We need to clear the air. It’s an important election. We don’t want any distractions.”

In a letter sent to Jag Badwal on Feb. 13, the new president of the party, Dan Muys, president of the Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas Tory riding association, stated, “We are keen for this new nomination process to proceed as quickly as possible so that we can get back to knocking on doors ... clearing the air will ensure we are not distracted from that greater purpose.”

The riding association, which has supported Levitt’s decision for a new nomination meeting, suggested holding the event March 8 at the Copetown Community Centre. That would be two days prior to the party announcing the results of its leadership race to replace Patrick Brown, who resigned after allegations of sexual misconduct.

Tory party officials recently announced they were holding new nomination meetings for Scarborough Centre and Ottawa West-Nepean.  The ridings were among a number of nominations that were heavily criticized by party members for how they were conducted.

A request was made to the Progressive Conservative nominating committee to overturn the nominations of Flamborough-Glanbrook and Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas. Former Flamborough-Glanbrook Tory riding association president John Demik said officials were satisfied with how the nomination process was conducted that led to Donna Skelly selected as its candidate.

Last May, Levitt was declared the winner by former Tory president Rick Dykstra on the third ballot during a contentious and often confusing nominating meeting at Ancaster High School. Levitt defeated second-place finisher Vikram Singh and Jeff Peller, who placed third. Singh and Peller appealed the nomination results to the party, but Brown certified Levitt as the winner.

Singh launched a judicial review, alleging “wrongful insertion of false ballots” at the event. He wanted the party to either declare him the winner of the nomination meeting or hold another one. Singh dropped his legal action in January, prior to a February court date. Details of the settlement between Singh and the party were not revealed.

Hamilton police are continuing a probe into unnamed Conservatives due to the nomination meeting. Federal prosecutors have been assigned to the case.

Soon after Brown resigned as party leader, Dykstra and Bob Stanley, another party official, stepped down.

Levitt acknowledged he is putting his already secured candidacy at risk if the party agrees to the new nomination process.

“I’m an optimist,” said Levitt “I have a good team. And strong backing.”

He said while attending a meet-and-greet for Tory leadership contender Christine Elliott on Feb. 13, he received “strong” indications of support.

Singh wouldn’t say if he would seek the nomination if the party agrees to Levitt's and the riding association’s request.

“I would consider all the options available,” he said.

Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas Tory candidate Ben Levitt wants party to hold new nomination to “clear my reputation”

News Feb 13, 2018 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas provincial Progressive Conservative candidate Ben Levitt has requested the party organize a new nomination meeting before the June 7 election to restore his political reputation.

Levitt said he recently returned from a trip and learned the Tory party decided to hold new nomination meetings in two other ridings where the results were questioned.

“We want to clear my name and reputation,” said Levitt, 26, in an interview. “We won (the nomination). But questions are still lingering. We need to clear the air. It’s an important election. We don’t want any distractions.”

In a letter sent to Jag Badwal on Feb. 13, the new president of the party, Dan Muys, president of the Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas Tory riding association, stated, “We are keen for this new nomination process to proceed as quickly as possible so that we can get back to knocking on doors ... clearing the air will ensure we are not distracted from that greater purpose.”

We need to clear the air. It’s an important election.
Tory provincial candidate Ben Levitt

The riding association, which has supported Levitt’s decision for a new nomination meeting, suggested holding the event March 8 at the Copetown Community Centre. That would be two days prior to the party announcing the results of its leadership race to replace Patrick Brown, who resigned after allegations of sexual misconduct.

Tory party officials recently announced they were holding new nomination meetings for Scarborough Centre and Ottawa West-Nepean.  The ridings were among a number of nominations that were heavily criticized by party members for how they were conducted.

A request was made to the Progressive Conservative nominating committee to overturn the nominations of Flamborough-Glanbrook and Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas. Former Flamborough-Glanbrook Tory riding association president John Demik said officials were satisfied with how the nomination process was conducted that led to Donna Skelly selected as its candidate.

Last May, Levitt was declared the winner by former Tory president Rick Dykstra on the third ballot during a contentious and often confusing nominating meeting at Ancaster High School. Levitt defeated second-place finisher Vikram Singh and Jeff Peller, who placed third. Singh and Peller appealed the nomination results to the party, but Brown certified Levitt as the winner.

Singh launched a judicial review, alleging “wrongful insertion of false ballots” at the event. He wanted the party to either declare him the winner of the nomination meeting or hold another one. Singh dropped his legal action in January, prior to a February court date. Details of the settlement between Singh and the party were not revealed.

Hamilton police are continuing a probe into unnamed Conservatives due to the nomination meeting. Federal prosecutors have been assigned to the case.

Soon after Brown resigned as party leader, Dykstra and Bob Stanley, another party official, stepped down.

Levitt acknowledged he is putting his already secured candidacy at risk if the party agrees to the new nomination process.

“I’m an optimist,” said Levitt “I have a good team. And strong backing.”

He said while attending a meet-and-greet for Tory leadership contender Christine Elliott on Feb. 13, he received “strong” indications of support.

Singh wouldn’t say if he would seek the nomination if the party agrees to Levitt's and the riding association’s request.

“I would consider all the options available,” he said.

Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas Tory candidate Ben Levitt wants party to hold new nomination to “clear my reputation”

News Feb 13, 2018 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas provincial Progressive Conservative candidate Ben Levitt has requested the party organize a new nomination meeting before the June 7 election to restore his political reputation.

Levitt said he recently returned from a trip and learned the Tory party decided to hold new nomination meetings in two other ridings where the results were questioned.

“We want to clear my name and reputation,” said Levitt, 26, in an interview. “We won (the nomination). But questions are still lingering. We need to clear the air. It’s an important election. We don’t want any distractions.”

In a letter sent to Jag Badwal on Feb. 13, the new president of the party, Dan Muys, president of the Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas Tory riding association, stated, “We are keen for this new nomination process to proceed as quickly as possible so that we can get back to knocking on doors ... clearing the air will ensure we are not distracted from that greater purpose.”

We need to clear the air. It’s an important election.
Tory provincial candidate Ben Levitt

The riding association, which has supported Levitt’s decision for a new nomination meeting, suggested holding the event March 8 at the Copetown Community Centre. That would be two days prior to the party announcing the results of its leadership race to replace Patrick Brown, who resigned after allegations of sexual misconduct.

Tory party officials recently announced they were holding new nomination meetings for Scarborough Centre and Ottawa West-Nepean.  The ridings were among a number of nominations that were heavily criticized by party members for how they were conducted.

A request was made to the Progressive Conservative nominating committee to overturn the nominations of Flamborough-Glanbrook and Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas. Former Flamborough-Glanbrook Tory riding association president John Demik said officials were satisfied with how the nomination process was conducted that led to Donna Skelly selected as its candidate.

Last May, Levitt was declared the winner by former Tory president Rick Dykstra on the third ballot during a contentious and often confusing nominating meeting at Ancaster High School. Levitt defeated second-place finisher Vikram Singh and Jeff Peller, who placed third. Singh and Peller appealed the nomination results to the party, but Brown certified Levitt as the winner.

Singh launched a judicial review, alleging “wrongful insertion of false ballots” at the event. He wanted the party to either declare him the winner of the nomination meeting or hold another one. Singh dropped his legal action in January, prior to a February court date. Details of the settlement between Singh and the party were not revealed.

Hamilton police are continuing a probe into unnamed Conservatives due to the nomination meeting. Federal prosecutors have been assigned to the case.

Soon after Brown resigned as party leader, Dykstra and Bob Stanley, another party official, stepped down.

Levitt acknowledged he is putting his already secured candidacy at risk if the party agrees to the new nomination process.

“I’m an optimist,” said Levitt “I have a good team. And strong backing.”

He said while attending a meet-and-greet for Tory leadership contender Christine Elliott on Feb. 13, he received “strong” indications of support.

Singh wouldn’t say if he would seek the nomination if the party agrees to Levitt's and the riding association’s request.

“I would consider all the options available,” he said.