City of Hamilton sued for fall in Albion gorge

News Jan 04, 2018 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

A man who needed to be rescued after slipping down the bank of the Albion Falls gorge two winters ago is suing the City of Hamilton.

Lawyers for Corey Dixon, 23, filed a statement of claim last month in Hamilton's courthouse against the city along with the Hamilton Conservation Authority, the Hamilton Conservation Foundation, the Bruce Trail Conservancy, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, and the Niagara Escarpment Commission.

The claim alleges they were all negligent in taking care of the staircase and the area at Albion Falls, which remained open to the public.

Dixon was injured in the early morning hours of Feb. 27, 2016. According to the claim, he slipped at the bottom of the concrete staircase at the site and continued to slide until he fell over a ravine and a rock ledge to land "violently" on the rocks at the bottom of Albion Falls. He lay "helpless on the ground for over an hour and half, causing him to suffer from hypothermia," the claim states. "As a result of the fall, Corey suffered serious and permanent injuries."

Dixon is seeking damages of $390,000 — the maximum amount allowed for pain, suffering and loss of enjoyment of life, according to his Barrie lawyer Robert Durante — but has left another search for special damages (for loss of income and future earnings) open-ended for the courts to decide.

A city spokeswoman said the statement of claim is being addressed “through standard procedure.”

“The city would like to remind residents of the dangers of waterfalls, even in the cold weather,” said Jasmine Graham. “Residents should stick to open and marked trails, and view the falls from the safe viewing platforms. Climbing waterfalls on city-owned lands – even if they are frozen – is dangerous and considered trespassing.”

The city offers safety tips at hamilton.ca/waterfallsafety.

Last July, following two accidental deaths at Albion Falls and in the span of a year and a number of rescue calls, the stairs were shuttered, fencing was installed around the top of the gorge, no trespassing and warning signs were posted and bylaw officers were directed to patrol the area and ticket scofflaws.

A report to council noted more than 49,000 people visited Albion Falls between July 17 and Oct. 9 — an average of more than 4,000 per week, about 85 per cent of them on weekends. During that time, 162 people were ticketed for trespassing and 542 vehicles were tagged for parking violations.

The city is working on a plan to install a staircase and viewing platform on the south side of the falls.

— with files from the Hamilton Spectator

City of Hamilton sued for fall in Albion gorge

Corey Dixon suing for $390,000 for February 2016 incident

News Jan 04, 2018 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

A man who needed to be rescued after slipping down the bank of the Albion Falls gorge two winters ago is suing the City of Hamilton.

Lawyers for Corey Dixon, 23, filed a statement of claim last month in Hamilton's courthouse against the city along with the Hamilton Conservation Authority, the Hamilton Conservation Foundation, the Bruce Trail Conservancy, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, and the Niagara Escarpment Commission.

The claim alleges they were all negligent in taking care of the staircase and the area at Albion Falls, which remained open to the public.

Dixon was injured in the early morning hours of Feb. 27, 2016. According to the claim, he slipped at the bottom of the concrete staircase at the site and continued to slide until he fell over a ravine and a rock ledge to land "violently" on the rocks at the bottom of Albion Falls. He lay "helpless on the ground for over an hour and half, causing him to suffer from hypothermia," the claim states. "As a result of the fall, Corey suffered serious and permanent injuries."

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Dixon is seeking damages of $390,000 — the maximum amount allowed for pain, suffering and loss of enjoyment of life, according to his Barrie lawyer Robert Durante — but has left another search for special damages (for loss of income and future earnings) open-ended for the courts to decide.

A city spokeswoman said the statement of claim is being addressed “through standard procedure.”

“The city would like to remind residents of the dangers of waterfalls, even in the cold weather,” said Jasmine Graham. “Residents should stick to open and marked trails, and view the falls from the safe viewing platforms. Climbing waterfalls on city-owned lands – even if they are frozen – is dangerous and considered trespassing.”

The city offers safety tips at hamilton.ca/waterfallsafety.

Last July, following two accidental deaths at Albion Falls and in the span of a year and a number of rescue calls, the stairs were shuttered, fencing was installed around the top of the gorge, no trespassing and warning signs were posted and bylaw officers were directed to patrol the area and ticket scofflaws.

A report to council noted more than 49,000 people visited Albion Falls between July 17 and Oct. 9 — an average of more than 4,000 per week, about 85 per cent of them on weekends. During that time, 162 people were ticketed for trespassing and 542 vehicles were tagged for parking violations.

The city is working on a plan to install a staircase and viewing platform on the south side of the falls.

— with files from the Hamilton Spectator

City of Hamilton sued for fall in Albion gorge

Corey Dixon suing for $390,000 for February 2016 incident

News Jan 04, 2018 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

A man who needed to be rescued after slipping down the bank of the Albion Falls gorge two winters ago is suing the City of Hamilton.

Lawyers for Corey Dixon, 23, filed a statement of claim last month in Hamilton's courthouse against the city along with the Hamilton Conservation Authority, the Hamilton Conservation Foundation, the Bruce Trail Conservancy, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, and the Niagara Escarpment Commission.

The claim alleges they were all negligent in taking care of the staircase and the area at Albion Falls, which remained open to the public.

Dixon was injured in the early morning hours of Feb. 27, 2016. According to the claim, he slipped at the bottom of the concrete staircase at the site and continued to slide until he fell over a ravine and a rock ledge to land "violently" on the rocks at the bottom of Albion Falls. He lay "helpless on the ground for over an hour and half, causing him to suffer from hypothermia," the claim states. "As a result of the fall, Corey suffered serious and permanent injuries."

Related Content

Dixon is seeking damages of $390,000 — the maximum amount allowed for pain, suffering and loss of enjoyment of life, according to his Barrie lawyer Robert Durante — but has left another search for special damages (for loss of income and future earnings) open-ended for the courts to decide.

A city spokeswoman said the statement of claim is being addressed “through standard procedure.”

“The city would like to remind residents of the dangers of waterfalls, even in the cold weather,” said Jasmine Graham. “Residents should stick to open and marked trails, and view the falls from the safe viewing platforms. Climbing waterfalls on city-owned lands – even if they are frozen – is dangerous and considered trespassing.”

The city offers safety tips at hamilton.ca/waterfallsafety.

Last July, following two accidental deaths at Albion Falls and in the span of a year and a number of rescue calls, the stairs were shuttered, fencing was installed around the top of the gorge, no trespassing and warning signs were posted and bylaw officers were directed to patrol the area and ticket scofflaws.

A report to council noted more than 49,000 people visited Albion Falls between July 17 and Oct. 9 — an average of more than 4,000 per week, about 85 per cent of them on weekends. During that time, 162 people were ticketed for trespassing and 542 vehicles were tagged for parking violations.

The city is working on a plan to install a staircase and viewing platform on the south side of the falls.

— with files from the Hamilton Spectator