‘It could be an all-new city’

News Dec 07, 2017 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

They are sprawling fields, sparsely populated with farmhouses and plots of cash crops. But by 2031, the Elfrida area is projected to become an urban metropolis of 30,000 residents. And it isn’t stopping there.

Today the City of Hamilton is preparing for what that future growth could entail. As part of the growth-related integrated development strategy (GRIDS), approved by council in 2006, Elfrida is the preferred site to accommodate future growth outside the city’s current urban boundary.

Hamilton is currently in the midst of a comprehensive secondary planning process for Elfrida that will help shape that growth.

The Elfrida growth plan will also have big implications for the existing urban areas of upper Stoney Creek, Glanbrook and Hamilton Mountain.

Hamilton is gathering input from the public as it moves forward. The process continued Dec. 6 during an open house at Valley Park Recreation Centre.

Joe Nethery, senior project manager at WSP Engineering Consulting Services, said once Elfrida is fully built out by 2041, the area could include between 72,000 and 80,000 people and jobs.

“It’s basically equivalent to a Peterborough or two-and-a-half Dundases that can be accommodated within these lands,” said Nethery. “It could be an all-new city.”

The Elfrida growth plan area covers 1,250 hectares of almost entirely rural land, south and east of the corner of Rymal Road East and Upper Centennial Parkway.

City planning staff presented three hypothetical secondary plan concepts at the Dec. 6 open house before allowing participants to break into small groups and provide written feedback.

Christine Newbold, city manager of community planning and geographic information systems, said the design concepts are intended to provide examples of how future growth could be accommodated. Significant wetlands, habitats of species at risk and floodplains have been excluded from the development plan areas. No single plan will be adopted in its entirety.

“We’re not looking at specific concepts in terms of concepts to move forward to approval,” said Newbold. “These are illustrations about how the different land uses could be arranged in a new community.”

The three concept plans show varying degrees of development intensification, but are all based on a provincial guideline of 80 residents and jobs per hectare of new greenfield development.

“We have to make sure that the densities we will be proposing are sufficient to meet that,” said Newbold.

Along with mixed-use and commercial developments, elementary and secondary schools, public parks, community centres and places of worship, the secondary plan concepts include multiple housing forms.

“Singles, semis, semi-detached – all forms of housing will be considered in this area, and apartments as well,” said Newbold.

Newbold said transit is a key component of the Elfrida growth plan.

“The success in this community will be based on how well transit is used,” said Newbold. “The transportation network and the quality of the streets will be very important.”

While it remains a long-term goal forecast within the next 25 years, the Elfrida area is envisioned as part of the “S” line within the city’s BLAST rapid transit network. The proposed line would run from Eastgate Square, south along Centennial Parkway, to Elfrida, and west along Rymal Road to the Ancaster Business Park at Duff's Corners.

During a previous round of open houses in June, residents of Hannon’s Summit Park subdivision told the city Rymal Road is frequently gridlocked during morning and afternoon rush hours. And although the city currently provides bus service on Rymal, there is currently no GO Transit service available above the escarpment, which forces residents commuting to jobs in Toronto or Niagara to drive cars.

The three concept plans the city presented Dec. 6 show housing will mostly displace farmland. One of the concept plans does include an organic farm just north of Golf Club Road.

Stoney Creek Chamber of Commerce executive director Patti Hall attended the Dec. 6 open house as an observer. Hall said the chamber could have an opportunity to expand its membership once Elfrida is fully urbanized.

“Really, it’s partnering right beside Stoney Creek and we have some members in this area and into Binbrook. So it’s actually a pretty good area to grow for us. We are definitely looking to expand right up into Binbrook.”

Future public open houses for the Elfrida growth plan are tentatively planned for next spring or summer. For more details, see Hamilton.ca/elfrida.

‘It could be an all-new city’

Hamilton plans for explosive growth in Elfrida

News Dec 07, 2017 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

They are sprawling fields, sparsely populated with farmhouses and plots of cash crops. But by 2031, the Elfrida area is projected to become an urban metropolis of 30,000 residents. And it isn’t stopping there.

Today the City of Hamilton is preparing for what that future growth could entail. As part of the growth-related integrated development strategy (GRIDS), approved by council in 2006, Elfrida is the preferred site to accommodate future growth outside the city’s current urban boundary.

Hamilton is currently in the midst of a comprehensive secondary planning process for Elfrida that will help shape that growth.

The Elfrida growth plan will also have big implications for the existing urban areas of upper Stoney Creek, Glanbrook and Hamilton Mountain.

Hamilton is gathering input from the public as it moves forward. The process continued Dec. 6 during an open house at Valley Park Recreation Centre.

Joe Nethery, senior project manager at WSP Engineering Consulting Services, said once Elfrida is fully built out by 2041, the area could include between 72,000 and 80,000 people and jobs.

“It’s basically equivalent to a Peterborough or two-and-a-half Dundases that can be accommodated within these lands,” said Nethery. “It could be an all-new city.”

The Elfrida growth plan area covers 1,250 hectares of almost entirely rural land, south and east of the corner of Rymal Road East and Upper Centennial Parkway.

City planning staff presented three hypothetical secondary plan concepts at the Dec. 6 open house before allowing participants to break into small groups and provide written feedback.

Christine Newbold, city manager of community planning and geographic information systems, said the design concepts are intended to provide examples of how future growth could be accommodated. Significant wetlands, habitats of species at risk and floodplains have been excluded from the development plan areas. No single plan will be adopted in its entirety.

“We’re not looking at specific concepts in terms of concepts to move forward to approval,” said Newbold. “These are illustrations about how the different land uses could be arranged in a new community.”

The three concept plans show varying degrees of development intensification, but are all based on a provincial guideline of 80 residents and jobs per hectare of new greenfield development.

“We have to make sure that the densities we will be proposing are sufficient to meet that,” said Newbold.

Along with mixed-use and commercial developments, elementary and secondary schools, public parks, community centres and places of worship, the secondary plan concepts include multiple housing forms.

“Singles, semis, semi-detached – all forms of housing will be considered in this area, and apartments as well,” said Newbold.

Newbold said transit is a key component of the Elfrida growth plan.

“The success in this community will be based on how well transit is used,” said Newbold. “The transportation network and the quality of the streets will be very important.”

While it remains a long-term goal forecast within the next 25 years, the Elfrida area is envisioned as part of the “S” line within the city’s BLAST rapid transit network. The proposed line would run from Eastgate Square, south along Centennial Parkway, to Elfrida, and west along Rymal Road to the Ancaster Business Park at Duff's Corners.

During a previous round of open houses in June, residents of Hannon’s Summit Park subdivision told the city Rymal Road is frequently gridlocked during morning and afternoon rush hours. And although the city currently provides bus service on Rymal, there is currently no GO Transit service available above the escarpment, which forces residents commuting to jobs in Toronto or Niagara to drive cars.

The three concept plans the city presented Dec. 6 show housing will mostly displace farmland. One of the concept plans does include an organic farm just north of Golf Club Road.

Stoney Creek Chamber of Commerce executive director Patti Hall attended the Dec. 6 open house as an observer. Hall said the chamber could have an opportunity to expand its membership once Elfrida is fully urbanized.

“Really, it’s partnering right beside Stoney Creek and we have some members in this area and into Binbrook. So it’s actually a pretty good area to grow for us. We are definitely looking to expand right up into Binbrook.”

Future public open houses for the Elfrida growth plan are tentatively planned for next spring or summer. For more details, see Hamilton.ca/elfrida.

‘It could be an all-new city’

Hamilton plans for explosive growth in Elfrida

News Dec 07, 2017 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

They are sprawling fields, sparsely populated with farmhouses and plots of cash crops. But by 2031, the Elfrida area is projected to become an urban metropolis of 30,000 residents. And it isn’t stopping there.

Today the City of Hamilton is preparing for what that future growth could entail. As part of the growth-related integrated development strategy (GRIDS), approved by council in 2006, Elfrida is the preferred site to accommodate future growth outside the city’s current urban boundary.

Hamilton is currently in the midst of a comprehensive secondary planning process for Elfrida that will help shape that growth.

The Elfrida growth plan will also have big implications for the existing urban areas of upper Stoney Creek, Glanbrook and Hamilton Mountain.

Hamilton is gathering input from the public as it moves forward. The process continued Dec. 6 during an open house at Valley Park Recreation Centre.

Joe Nethery, senior project manager at WSP Engineering Consulting Services, said once Elfrida is fully built out by 2041, the area could include between 72,000 and 80,000 people and jobs.

“It’s basically equivalent to a Peterborough or two-and-a-half Dundases that can be accommodated within these lands,” said Nethery. “It could be an all-new city.”

The Elfrida growth plan area covers 1,250 hectares of almost entirely rural land, south and east of the corner of Rymal Road East and Upper Centennial Parkway.

City planning staff presented three hypothetical secondary plan concepts at the Dec. 6 open house before allowing participants to break into small groups and provide written feedback.

Christine Newbold, city manager of community planning and geographic information systems, said the design concepts are intended to provide examples of how future growth could be accommodated. Significant wetlands, habitats of species at risk and floodplains have been excluded from the development plan areas. No single plan will be adopted in its entirety.

“We’re not looking at specific concepts in terms of concepts to move forward to approval,” said Newbold. “These are illustrations about how the different land uses could be arranged in a new community.”

The three concept plans show varying degrees of development intensification, but are all based on a provincial guideline of 80 residents and jobs per hectare of new greenfield development.

“We have to make sure that the densities we will be proposing are sufficient to meet that,” said Newbold.

Along with mixed-use and commercial developments, elementary and secondary schools, public parks, community centres and places of worship, the secondary plan concepts include multiple housing forms.

“Singles, semis, semi-detached – all forms of housing will be considered in this area, and apartments as well,” said Newbold.

Newbold said transit is a key component of the Elfrida growth plan.

“The success in this community will be based on how well transit is used,” said Newbold. “The transportation network and the quality of the streets will be very important.”

While it remains a long-term goal forecast within the next 25 years, the Elfrida area is envisioned as part of the “S” line within the city’s BLAST rapid transit network. The proposed line would run from Eastgate Square, south along Centennial Parkway, to Elfrida, and west along Rymal Road to the Ancaster Business Park at Duff's Corners.

During a previous round of open houses in June, residents of Hannon’s Summit Park subdivision told the city Rymal Road is frequently gridlocked during morning and afternoon rush hours. And although the city currently provides bus service on Rymal, there is currently no GO Transit service available above the escarpment, which forces residents commuting to jobs in Toronto or Niagara to drive cars.

The three concept plans the city presented Dec. 6 show housing will mostly displace farmland. One of the concept plans does include an organic farm just north of Golf Club Road.

Stoney Creek Chamber of Commerce executive director Patti Hall attended the Dec. 6 open house as an observer. Hall said the chamber could have an opportunity to expand its membership once Elfrida is fully urbanized.

“Really, it’s partnering right beside Stoney Creek and we have some members in this area and into Binbrook. So it’s actually a pretty good area to grow for us. We are definitely looking to expand right up into Binbrook.”

Future public open houses for the Elfrida growth plan are tentatively planned for next spring or summer. For more details, see Hamilton.ca/elfrida.