Dundas museum adds additional piece of Dundas’ industrial history

News Nov 29, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Another distinctive piece of Dundas’ industrial history has been added to the front yard of the Dundas Museum and Archives.

Park Street West was closed to traffic between Princess and Albert streets Tuesday morning, and interested onlookers gathered at nearby corners, as the nearly 80-year-old, 20-ton steam hammer made at Dundas’ Bertram and Sons factory was craned into place near the museum’s entrance.

At more than 44,000 pounds, it’s four times as heavy as the 114-year-old Bertram punch and shear machine placed on the museum’s east lawn in the summer.

That’s roughly equivalent to the weight of 12 cars or five and a half hippos.

The steam hammer was the type of machine made by the Dundas company in the late 1930s and used in the manufacturing of parts for engines and locomotives. During the Second World War, Bertram and Sons was a big part of Canada’s war effort.

“What we do know is in 1954, Stelco bought it used,” said Dundas museum curator and general manager Kevin Puddister.

For the past decade, the museum’s huge new local industrial heritage artifact was one of two lying on its side in a shed at the Hamilton Museum of Steam and Technology.

After some negotiation, the city offered the Dundas steam hammer to its hometown museum and it was happily accepted.

The machine was carefully loaded onto a flatbed truck at its previous Woodward Avenue home on Monday, Nov. 27, then delivered to the museum at 139 Park St. W. on Tuesday morning, where a large crane lifted it into its new home.

Dundas museum staff said Stelco workers used the steam hammer to mould blocks of molten steel into the shape necessary for a particular job. A steam-driven piston exerted tremendous pressure on the malleable steel. In the early days, workers held the steel in place with tongs. Eventually, a safer hydraulic arm was used.

Puddister said the steam hammer, and the punch and shear machine, represent the industrial history that played such a big role in building Dundas from the mid 1800s to the mid 1900s.

“It’s an important part of our heritage,” he said.

Dundas residents Ken Beel and Bill Stewart helped lead a team of volunteers, including several local Rotarians, who helped with the transfer and placement of the steam hammer Tuesday morning.

 


Dundas museum adds additional piece of Dundas’ industrial history

Bertram and Sons 20-ton, 16-foot tall steam hammer returns home

News Nov 29, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Another distinctive piece of Dundas’ industrial history has been added to the front yard of the Dundas Museum and Archives.

Park Street West was closed to traffic between Princess and Albert streets Tuesday morning, and interested onlookers gathered at nearby corners, as the nearly 80-year-old, 20-ton steam hammer made at Dundas’ Bertram and Sons factory was craned into place near the museum’s entrance.

At more than 44,000 pounds, it’s four times as heavy as the 114-year-old Bertram punch and shear machine placed on the museum’s east lawn in the summer.

That’s roughly equivalent to the weight of 12 cars or five and a half hippos.

It took some discussions but we were able to arrange to have them transferred to the (Hamilton) museum rather than sold for scrap … I have to applaud Stelco for that decision.

The steam hammer was the type of machine made by the Dundas company in the late 1930s and used in the manufacturing of parts for engines and locomotives. During the Second World War, Bertram and Sons was a big part of Canada’s war effort.

“What we do know is in 1954, Stelco bought it used,” said Dundas museum curator and general manager Kevin Puddister.

For the past decade, the museum’s huge new local industrial heritage artifact was one of two lying on its side in a shed at the Hamilton Museum of Steam and Technology.

After some negotiation, the city offered the Dundas steam hammer to its hometown museum and it was happily accepted.

The machine was carefully loaded onto a flatbed truck at its previous Woodward Avenue home on Monday, Nov. 27, then delivered to the museum at 139 Park St. W. on Tuesday morning, where a large crane lifted it into its new home.

Dundas museum staff said Stelco workers used the steam hammer to mould blocks of molten steel into the shape necessary for a particular job. A steam-driven piston exerted tremendous pressure on the malleable steel. In the early days, workers held the steel in place with tongs. Eventually, a safer hydraulic arm was used.

Puddister said the steam hammer, and the punch and shear machine, represent the industrial history that played such a big role in building Dundas from the mid 1800s to the mid 1900s.

“It’s an important part of our heritage,” he said.

Dundas residents Ken Beel and Bill Stewart helped lead a team of volunteers, including several local Rotarians, who helped with the transfer and placement of the steam hammer Tuesday morning.

 


Dundas museum adds additional piece of Dundas’ industrial history

Bertram and Sons 20-ton, 16-foot tall steam hammer returns home

News Nov 29, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Another distinctive piece of Dundas’ industrial history has been added to the front yard of the Dundas Museum and Archives.

Park Street West was closed to traffic between Princess and Albert streets Tuesday morning, and interested onlookers gathered at nearby corners, as the nearly 80-year-old, 20-ton steam hammer made at Dundas’ Bertram and Sons factory was craned into place near the museum’s entrance.

At more than 44,000 pounds, it’s four times as heavy as the 114-year-old Bertram punch and shear machine placed on the museum’s east lawn in the summer.

That’s roughly equivalent to the weight of 12 cars or five and a half hippos.

It took some discussions but we were able to arrange to have them transferred to the (Hamilton) museum rather than sold for scrap … I have to applaud Stelco for that decision.

The steam hammer was the type of machine made by the Dundas company in the late 1930s and used in the manufacturing of parts for engines and locomotives. During the Second World War, Bertram and Sons was a big part of Canada’s war effort.

“What we do know is in 1954, Stelco bought it used,” said Dundas museum curator and general manager Kevin Puddister.

For the past decade, the museum’s huge new local industrial heritage artifact was one of two lying on its side in a shed at the Hamilton Museum of Steam and Technology.

After some negotiation, the city offered the Dundas steam hammer to its hometown museum and it was happily accepted.

The machine was carefully loaded onto a flatbed truck at its previous Woodward Avenue home on Monday, Nov. 27, then delivered to the museum at 139 Park St. W. on Tuesday morning, where a large crane lifted it into its new home.

Dundas museum staff said Stelco workers used the steam hammer to mould blocks of molten steel into the shape necessary for a particular job. A steam-driven piston exerted tremendous pressure on the malleable steel. In the early days, workers held the steel in place with tongs. Eventually, a safer hydraulic arm was used.

Puddister said the steam hammer, and the punch and shear machine, represent the industrial history that played such a big role in building Dundas from the mid 1800s to the mid 1900s.

“It’s an important part of our heritage,” he said.

Dundas residents Ken Beel and Bill Stewart helped lead a team of volunteers, including several local Rotarians, who helped with the transfer and placement of the steam hammer Tuesday morning.