Hamilton police conducting criminal investigation into HWAD PC nomination meeting

News Nov 17, 2017 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

Hamilton police have authorized a criminal investigation of the disputed Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas Progressive Conservative nomination meeting held last spring in Ancaster.

Constable Lorraine Edwards said police are looking into “any criminality involved” that occurred during a marathon six-hour nomination May 7 held by the Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas Tory riding association that had voters lined up through the doors of Ancaster High School and out near Jerseyville Road.

Edwards said detectives are examining materials that were provided by Tory party officials. She said the investigation is expected to take several months to complete.

Vikram Singh, a Hamilton lawyer who finished second to declared winner Ben Levitt in the four-person nomination contest, filed a complaint with police in August after he launched a civil action against the party alleging “wrongful insertion of false ballots.”

Hamilton police said they initially received a complaint in May from a participant in the PC nomination process, which prompted the review of the meeting.

The criminal probe is separate to Singh’s civil action against the Progressive Conservative Party and a number of officials, including party president Rick Dykstra, Tory executive director Bob Stanley and Logan Bugeja, senior aid to leader Patrick Brown.

Singh is scheduled to appear in court for the civil motion the week of Dec. 4. Singh has asked the court to either overturn the nomination process or ask the party to conduct another nomination. The action has been delayed twice previously.

Singh’s lawyer, Richard Macklin, said in a response to the police probe that his client is “confident that the Hamilton Police Service will conduct a thorough investigation and uncover the truth surrounding what occurred at the HWAD PC nomination."

Macklin said Singh believes that a “thorough investigation and full airing of what took place is a matter of great public importance.”

A lawyer representing the PC Party did not return a request for comment in time for publication.

Jeff Peller, who placed third in the nomination, recently withdrew a separate court application against the Tories in October.

Singh and Peller both questioned how the ballots were counted; that credentials didn’t match with identifications provided; and they have claimed some people were denied the opportunity to vote.

West Hamilton resident Levitt was declared the winner by Dykstra on the third ballot. Also taking part in the contest was Jobson Easow.

Singh and Peller filed internal appeals to the PC Party executive alleging problems at the nomination. But Brown quashed both appeals and approved Levitt as the winner.

Due to issues surrounding recent nomination contests, Brown hired the private sector auditors PricewaterhouseCoopers to ensure the integrity of future nominations.

Hamilton police conducting criminal investigation into HWAD PC nomination meeting

News Nov 17, 2017 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

Hamilton police have authorized a criminal investigation of the disputed Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas Progressive Conservative nomination meeting held last spring in Ancaster.

Constable Lorraine Edwards said police are looking into “any criminality involved” that occurred during a marathon six-hour nomination May 7 held by the Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas Tory riding association that had voters lined up through the doors of Ancaster High School and out near Jerseyville Road.

Edwards said detectives are examining materials that were provided by Tory party officials. She said the investigation is expected to take several months to complete.

Vikram Singh, a Hamilton lawyer who finished second to declared winner Ben Levitt in the four-person nomination contest, filed a complaint with police in August after he launched a civil action against the party alleging “wrongful insertion of false ballots.”

Hamilton police said they initially received a complaint in May from a participant in the PC nomination process, which prompted the review of the meeting.

The criminal probe is separate to Singh’s civil action against the Progressive Conservative Party and a number of officials, including party president Rick Dykstra, Tory executive director Bob Stanley and Logan Bugeja, senior aid to leader Patrick Brown.

Singh is scheduled to appear in court for the civil motion the week of Dec. 4. Singh has asked the court to either overturn the nomination process or ask the party to conduct another nomination. The action has been delayed twice previously.

Singh’s lawyer, Richard Macklin, said in a response to the police probe that his client is “confident that the Hamilton Police Service will conduct a thorough investigation and uncover the truth surrounding what occurred at the HWAD PC nomination."

Macklin said Singh believes that a “thorough investigation and full airing of what took place is a matter of great public importance.”

A lawyer representing the PC Party did not return a request for comment in time for publication.

Jeff Peller, who placed third in the nomination, recently withdrew a separate court application against the Tories in October.

Singh and Peller both questioned how the ballots were counted; that credentials didn’t match with identifications provided; and they have claimed some people were denied the opportunity to vote.

West Hamilton resident Levitt was declared the winner by Dykstra on the third ballot. Also taking part in the contest was Jobson Easow.

Singh and Peller filed internal appeals to the PC Party executive alleging problems at the nomination. But Brown quashed both appeals and approved Levitt as the winner.

Due to issues surrounding recent nomination contests, Brown hired the private sector auditors PricewaterhouseCoopers to ensure the integrity of future nominations.

Hamilton police conducting criminal investigation into HWAD PC nomination meeting

News Nov 17, 2017 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

Hamilton police have authorized a criminal investigation of the disputed Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas Progressive Conservative nomination meeting held last spring in Ancaster.

Constable Lorraine Edwards said police are looking into “any criminality involved” that occurred during a marathon six-hour nomination May 7 held by the Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas Tory riding association that had voters lined up through the doors of Ancaster High School and out near Jerseyville Road.

Edwards said detectives are examining materials that were provided by Tory party officials. She said the investigation is expected to take several months to complete.

Vikram Singh, a Hamilton lawyer who finished second to declared winner Ben Levitt in the four-person nomination contest, filed a complaint with police in August after he launched a civil action against the party alleging “wrongful insertion of false ballots.”

Hamilton police said they initially received a complaint in May from a participant in the PC nomination process, which prompted the review of the meeting.

The criminal probe is separate to Singh’s civil action against the Progressive Conservative Party and a number of officials, including party president Rick Dykstra, Tory executive director Bob Stanley and Logan Bugeja, senior aid to leader Patrick Brown.

Singh is scheduled to appear in court for the civil motion the week of Dec. 4. Singh has asked the court to either overturn the nomination process or ask the party to conduct another nomination. The action has been delayed twice previously.

Singh’s lawyer, Richard Macklin, said in a response to the police probe that his client is “confident that the Hamilton Police Service will conduct a thorough investigation and uncover the truth surrounding what occurred at the HWAD PC nomination."

Macklin said Singh believes that a “thorough investigation and full airing of what took place is a matter of great public importance.”

A lawyer representing the PC Party did not return a request for comment in time for publication.

Jeff Peller, who placed third in the nomination, recently withdrew a separate court application against the Tories in October.

Singh and Peller both questioned how the ballots were counted; that credentials didn’t match with identifications provided; and they have claimed some people were denied the opportunity to vote.

West Hamilton resident Levitt was declared the winner by Dykstra on the third ballot. Also taking part in the contest was Jobson Easow.

Singh and Peller filed internal appeals to the PC Party executive alleging problems at the nomination. But Brown quashed both appeals and approved Levitt as the winner.

Due to issues surrounding recent nomination contests, Brown hired the private sector auditors PricewaterhouseCoopers to ensure the integrity of future nominations.