Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath says proposed government-operated pot shops won’t address black market problems

News Oct 30, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Ontario Liberals’ marijuana legislation seems to be too much in a haze for the New Democrats.

Leader Andrea Horwath said the provincial Liberals’ plan to establish 40 government-owned shops by next year to sell marijuana doesn’t seem to meet the goal of preserving a social aspect to the distribution of marijuana and reducing crime.

“I don’t know if 40 dispensaries will achieve their goals of taking it off the black market,” said Horwath in an interview.

The federal government is scheduled to legalize and regulate the sale and distribution of marijuana by July 1, 2018. The Ontario plan is to create a total of 150 LCBO-operated stores to sell pot by 2020. There are expected to be 40 stores in place across the province by July 1, 2018, 80 by 2019 and 150 by 2020.

The LCBO will receive its marijuana from the medical marijuana producers licensed by Health Canada.

Horwath said the Liberals are preparing to introduce their marijuana legislation this week so the public will be able to review further the details of the plan.

The provincial NDP leader also said the Liberals need to examine the impact large marijuana grow operations are having in the rural areas of Ontario. She said in other jurisdictions, including Colorado, which legalized marijuana in 2014, large greenhouse operations have taken over prime agricultural land.

Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson is proposing a motion for council’s consideration to have the province limit the size of marijuana grow ops in rural areas, and is requesting the city and province allow municipalities to force marijuana growers to build their greenhouses on brownfields.

“We don’t want valuable farmland paved over,” said Horwath. “Neither do we want to see it go to massive marijuana crops. We need to see regulation and quality control. People need to know what it is they are selling; people need to know what it is they are buying.”

Former provincial agriculture minister and Hamilton Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin said he is open to examining how to regulate marijuana grow ops on agricultural land, including how it impacts the Greenbelt.

Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath says proposed government-operated pot shops won’t address black market problems

News Oct 30, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Ontario Liberals’ marijuana legislation seems to be too much in a haze for the New Democrats.

Leader Andrea Horwath said the provincial Liberals’ plan to establish 40 government-owned shops by next year to sell marijuana doesn’t seem to meet the goal of preserving a social aspect to the distribution of marijuana and reducing crime.

“I don’t know if 40 dispensaries will achieve their goals of taking it off the black market,” said Horwath in an interview.

The federal government is scheduled to legalize and regulate the sale and distribution of marijuana by July 1, 2018. The Ontario plan is to create a total of 150 LCBO-operated stores to sell pot by 2020. There are expected to be 40 stores in place across the province by July 1, 2018, 80 by 2019 and 150 by 2020.

The LCBO will receive its marijuana from the medical marijuana producers licensed by Health Canada.

Horwath said the Liberals are preparing to introduce their marijuana legislation this week so the public will be able to review further the details of the plan.

The provincial NDP leader also said the Liberals need to examine the impact large marijuana grow operations are having in the rural areas of Ontario. She said in other jurisdictions, including Colorado, which legalized marijuana in 2014, large greenhouse operations have taken over prime agricultural land.

Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson is proposing a motion for council’s consideration to have the province limit the size of marijuana grow ops in rural areas, and is requesting the city and province allow municipalities to force marijuana growers to build their greenhouses on brownfields.

“We don’t want valuable farmland paved over,” said Horwath. “Neither do we want to see it go to massive marijuana crops. We need to see regulation and quality control. People need to know what it is they are selling; people need to know what it is they are buying.”

Former provincial agriculture minister and Hamilton Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin said he is open to examining how to regulate marijuana grow ops on agricultural land, including how it impacts the Greenbelt.

Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath says proposed government-operated pot shops won’t address black market problems

News Oct 30, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Ontario Liberals’ marijuana legislation seems to be too much in a haze for the New Democrats.

Leader Andrea Horwath said the provincial Liberals’ plan to establish 40 government-owned shops by next year to sell marijuana doesn’t seem to meet the goal of preserving a social aspect to the distribution of marijuana and reducing crime.

“I don’t know if 40 dispensaries will achieve their goals of taking it off the black market,” said Horwath in an interview.

The federal government is scheduled to legalize and regulate the sale and distribution of marijuana by July 1, 2018. The Ontario plan is to create a total of 150 LCBO-operated stores to sell pot by 2020. There are expected to be 40 stores in place across the province by July 1, 2018, 80 by 2019 and 150 by 2020.

The LCBO will receive its marijuana from the medical marijuana producers licensed by Health Canada.

Horwath said the Liberals are preparing to introduce their marijuana legislation this week so the public will be able to review further the details of the plan.

The provincial NDP leader also said the Liberals need to examine the impact large marijuana grow operations are having in the rural areas of Ontario. She said in other jurisdictions, including Colorado, which legalized marijuana in 2014, large greenhouse operations have taken over prime agricultural land.

Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson is proposing a motion for council’s consideration to have the province limit the size of marijuana grow ops in rural areas, and is requesting the city and province allow municipalities to force marijuana growers to build their greenhouses on brownfields.

“We don’t want valuable farmland paved over,” said Horwath. “Neither do we want to see it go to massive marijuana crops. We need to see regulation and quality control. People need to know what it is they are selling; people need to know what it is they are buying.”

Former provincial agriculture minister and Hamilton Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin said he is open to examining how to regulate marijuana grow ops on agricultural land, including how it impacts the Greenbelt.