Hamilton Out of the Cold returns

News Nov 01, 2017 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

It’s a long-running program that offers free hot meals to anyone who wants one, or needs one.

Hamilton Out of the Cold brought its dinner program back to St. Stephen-on-the-Mount Anglican Church on Concession Street for a third year starting today. The program is slated to begin a fourth year at Immanuel Christian Reformed Church on Mohawk Road West on Monday.

“The demand is very strong,” said Glenn Leman, executive director of Hamilton Out of the Cold, which served 1,083 dinners at St. Stephen last year and 987 meals at Immanuel.

Across the city, it served nearly 28,000 meals in 2016.

The charitable organization began in December 1997 at the James Street Baptist Church and was modelled after the Toronto Out of the Cold program which began in January, 1987, following the death of a homeless man.

Hamilton Out of the Cold runs nine other dinner programs and a breakfast program in the lower city.

At the two Mountain churches, volunteers begin arriving around noon to make the soup.

When the doors open at 5 p.m., visitors are welcomed by a small army of volunteers who serve them a bowl of soup and bread followed by vegetables and a meat or poultry dish and then some fruit for dessert or to take home with them.

Leman said all of their nutritious meals are made in the church kitchens and the menu varies from week to week.

Visitors can range in number from 55 to 80 and the only thing they are asked for at the door is to provide a first name.

“We have a low-barrier, open-door policy,” Leman said. “We always ask for kindness and respect amongst all of our guests.”

The two Mountain churches are located in the Rolston and Eastmount neighbourhoods, which include a large number of economically challenged families and individuals. Those who drop by for a meal range from individuals who are down on their luck to single parents to seniors who want to get out and share a meal with someone.

“We welcome everybody and share a sense of community,” Leman said.

Tony Tigani, site supervisor at St. Stephen-on-the-Mount, noted people begin showing up at the church around 3 p.m. each Wednesday and most are adults.

“There’s a core group that comes in all the time, but I also see different faces every week,” he said.

Rev. Scott McNaughton said offering a home to Hamilton Out of the Cold complements other community outreach initiatives the church is doing.

“There really is a need up here on the Mountain,” he said. “There are pockets of people who really need help.”

The dinner program runs until the end of March.

Hamilton Out of the Cold returns

Free dinner program at two Mountain churches runs to the end of March

News Nov 01, 2017 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

It’s a long-running program that offers free hot meals to anyone who wants one, or needs one.

Hamilton Out of the Cold brought its dinner program back to St. Stephen-on-the-Mount Anglican Church on Concession Street for a third year starting today. The program is slated to begin a fourth year at Immanuel Christian Reformed Church on Mohawk Road West on Monday.

“The demand is very strong,” said Glenn Leman, executive director of Hamilton Out of the Cold, which served 1,083 dinners at St. Stephen last year and 987 meals at Immanuel.

Across the city, it served nearly 28,000 meals in 2016.

The charitable organization began in December 1997 at the James Street Baptist Church and was modelled after the Toronto Out of the Cold program which began in January, 1987, following the death of a homeless man.

Hamilton Out of the Cold runs nine other dinner programs and a breakfast program in the lower city.

At the two Mountain churches, volunteers begin arriving around noon to make the soup.

When the doors open at 5 p.m., visitors are welcomed by a small army of volunteers who serve them a bowl of soup and bread followed by vegetables and a meat or poultry dish and then some fruit for dessert or to take home with them.

Leman said all of their nutritious meals are made in the church kitchens and the menu varies from week to week.

Visitors can range in number from 55 to 80 and the only thing they are asked for at the door is to provide a first name.

“We have a low-barrier, open-door policy,” Leman said. “We always ask for kindness and respect amongst all of our guests.”

The two Mountain churches are located in the Rolston and Eastmount neighbourhoods, which include a large number of economically challenged families and individuals. Those who drop by for a meal range from individuals who are down on their luck to single parents to seniors who want to get out and share a meal with someone.

“We welcome everybody and share a sense of community,” Leman said.

Tony Tigani, site supervisor at St. Stephen-on-the-Mount, noted people begin showing up at the church around 3 p.m. each Wednesday and most are adults.

“There’s a core group that comes in all the time, but I also see different faces every week,” he said.

Rev. Scott McNaughton said offering a home to Hamilton Out of the Cold complements other community outreach initiatives the church is doing.

“There really is a need up here on the Mountain,” he said. “There are pockets of people who really need help.”

The dinner program runs until the end of March.

Hamilton Out of the Cold returns

Free dinner program at two Mountain churches runs to the end of March

News Nov 01, 2017 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

It’s a long-running program that offers free hot meals to anyone who wants one, or needs one.

Hamilton Out of the Cold brought its dinner program back to St. Stephen-on-the-Mount Anglican Church on Concession Street for a third year starting today. The program is slated to begin a fourth year at Immanuel Christian Reformed Church on Mohawk Road West on Monday.

“The demand is very strong,” said Glenn Leman, executive director of Hamilton Out of the Cold, which served 1,083 dinners at St. Stephen last year and 987 meals at Immanuel.

Across the city, it served nearly 28,000 meals in 2016.

The charitable organization began in December 1997 at the James Street Baptist Church and was modelled after the Toronto Out of the Cold program which began in January, 1987, following the death of a homeless man.

Hamilton Out of the Cold runs nine other dinner programs and a breakfast program in the lower city.

At the two Mountain churches, volunteers begin arriving around noon to make the soup.

When the doors open at 5 p.m., visitors are welcomed by a small army of volunteers who serve them a bowl of soup and bread followed by vegetables and a meat or poultry dish and then some fruit for dessert or to take home with them.

Leman said all of their nutritious meals are made in the church kitchens and the menu varies from week to week.

Visitors can range in number from 55 to 80 and the only thing they are asked for at the door is to provide a first name.

“We have a low-barrier, open-door policy,” Leman said. “We always ask for kindness and respect amongst all of our guests.”

The two Mountain churches are located in the Rolston and Eastmount neighbourhoods, which include a large number of economically challenged families and individuals. Those who drop by for a meal range from individuals who are down on their luck to single parents to seniors who want to get out and share a meal with someone.

“We welcome everybody and share a sense of community,” Leman said.

Tony Tigani, site supervisor at St. Stephen-on-the-Mount, noted people begin showing up at the church around 3 p.m. each Wednesday and most are adults.

“There’s a core group that comes in all the time, but I also see different faces every week,” he said.

Rev. Scott McNaughton said offering a home to Hamilton Out of the Cold complements other community outreach initiatives the church is doing.

“There really is a need up here on the Mountain,” he said. “There are pockets of people who really need help.”

The dinner program runs until the end of March.