Ontario Labour Minister Kevin Flynn says financial relief for farmers, small businesses coming soon

News Oct 05, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Ontario Labour Minister Kevin Flynn says farmers and small business owners will receive some financial assistance to compensate for the province boosting the minimum wage to $15 per hour starting Jan. 1, 2019.

Flynn, who was at Hamilton’s YWCA Oct. 5 to announce an amendment to the government’s labour reform legislation, said the province recognizes there will be some difficulty for businesses and farmers during the transition to a higher minimum wage.

“We know it is a challenge,” said Flynn. “We know businesses are up for the challenge. Some businesses in some sectors will see some help.”

Flynn said the assistance package, currently being reviewed by Agricultural Minister Jeff Leal and Economic Development Minister Brad Duguid, will be revealed “very, very shortly.”

“It’s being developed,” he said.

Options being considered include exempting the first $450,000 of small-business income from taxes, or setting aside 25 per cent of government procurement contracts for small businesses.

In July, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne announced her government would increase the minimum wage to $15 per hour by Jan. 1, 2019. The increase would be phased in gradually and would rise with inflation. On Oct. 1, the minimum wage jumped to $11.60 per hour, and it will increase again Jan. 1, 201, to $14 per hour.

During a roundtable event earlier this summer by the Flamborough Chamber of Commerce, Hamilton small business owners told Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin the increase was too much, too fast. A few business owners said they would have to cut hours or even lay off staff because of the extra labour cost.

The Ontario Federation of Agriculture said in a statement earlier this year the minimum wage hike would impact youth employment, make farmers less competitive and threaten food security and the sustainability of agriculture products available to Ontario consumers.

Flynn said the Ontario government is ready to work with both agriculture representatives and the business community to deal with the higher minimum wage’s impact.

Progressive Conservative leader Patrick Brown has stated the transition period to the $15 an hour minimum wage should be extended.

The Ontario Chamber of Commerce and Retail Council of Canada have stated Ontario could lose 185,000 jobs because of the higher minimum wage.,

The province’s economic watchdog, the Financial Accountability Office, projects the minimum wage increase would see more than 50,000 people lose their jobs, predominately teens and young adults.

Flynn said despite the “dueling economists,” examples of higher minimum wage increases implemented in parts of the United States and British Columbia have “seen economic growth the following year.”

Flynn said critics are “underestimating the impact of the injection of the money” from people earning a higher minimum wage.

Also part of Bill 148 legislation — employers will have to provide workers with more certainty in scheduling; provide temporary or part-time workers with the same wage as full-time workers in an effort to reduce a company’s reliance on temporary workers; provide additional vacation days;  extend personal leave; and make it easier for people to unionize.

Bill 148 is currently being reviewed by an all-party committee. Flynn wants the bill to be passed this fall so the minimum wage increase can take effect Jan. 1, 2018.

Ontario Labour Minister Kevin Flynn says financial relief for farmers, small businesses coming soon

News Oct 05, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Ontario Labour Minister Kevin Flynn says farmers and small business owners will receive some financial assistance to compensate for the province boosting the minimum wage to $15 per hour starting Jan. 1, 2019.

Flynn, who was at Hamilton’s YWCA Oct. 5 to announce an amendment to the government’s labour reform legislation, said the province recognizes there will be some difficulty for businesses and farmers during the transition to a higher minimum wage.

“We know it is a challenge,” said Flynn. “We know businesses are up for the challenge. Some businesses in some sectors will see some help.”

Flynn said the assistance package, currently being reviewed by Agricultural Minister Jeff Leal and Economic Development Minister Brad Duguid, will be revealed “very, very shortly.”

“It’s being developed,” he said.

Options being considered include exempting the first $450,000 of small-business income from taxes, or setting aside 25 per cent of government procurement contracts for small businesses.

In July, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne announced her government would increase the minimum wage to $15 per hour by Jan. 1, 2019. The increase would be phased in gradually and would rise with inflation. On Oct. 1, the minimum wage jumped to $11.60 per hour, and it will increase again Jan. 1, 201, to $14 per hour.

During a roundtable event earlier this summer by the Flamborough Chamber of Commerce, Hamilton small business owners told Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin the increase was too much, too fast. A few business owners said they would have to cut hours or even lay off staff because of the extra labour cost.

The Ontario Federation of Agriculture said in a statement earlier this year the minimum wage hike would impact youth employment, make farmers less competitive and threaten food security and the sustainability of agriculture products available to Ontario consumers.

Flynn said the Ontario government is ready to work with both agriculture representatives and the business community to deal with the higher minimum wage’s impact.

Progressive Conservative leader Patrick Brown has stated the transition period to the $15 an hour minimum wage should be extended.

The Ontario Chamber of Commerce and Retail Council of Canada have stated Ontario could lose 185,000 jobs because of the higher minimum wage.,

The province’s economic watchdog, the Financial Accountability Office, projects the minimum wage increase would see more than 50,000 people lose their jobs, predominately teens and young adults.

Flynn said despite the “dueling economists,” examples of higher minimum wage increases implemented in parts of the United States and British Columbia have “seen economic growth the following year.”

Flynn said critics are “underestimating the impact of the injection of the money” from people earning a higher minimum wage.

Also part of Bill 148 legislation — employers will have to provide workers with more certainty in scheduling; provide temporary or part-time workers with the same wage as full-time workers in an effort to reduce a company’s reliance on temporary workers; provide additional vacation days;  extend personal leave; and make it easier for people to unionize.

Bill 148 is currently being reviewed by an all-party committee. Flynn wants the bill to be passed this fall so the minimum wage increase can take effect Jan. 1, 2018.

Ontario Labour Minister Kevin Flynn says financial relief for farmers, small businesses coming soon

News Oct 05, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Ontario Labour Minister Kevin Flynn says farmers and small business owners will receive some financial assistance to compensate for the province boosting the minimum wage to $15 per hour starting Jan. 1, 2019.

Flynn, who was at Hamilton’s YWCA Oct. 5 to announce an amendment to the government’s labour reform legislation, said the province recognizes there will be some difficulty for businesses and farmers during the transition to a higher minimum wage.

“We know it is a challenge,” said Flynn. “We know businesses are up for the challenge. Some businesses in some sectors will see some help.”

Flynn said the assistance package, currently being reviewed by Agricultural Minister Jeff Leal and Economic Development Minister Brad Duguid, will be revealed “very, very shortly.”

“It’s being developed,” he said.

Options being considered include exempting the first $450,000 of small-business income from taxes, or setting aside 25 per cent of government procurement contracts for small businesses.

In July, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne announced her government would increase the minimum wage to $15 per hour by Jan. 1, 2019. The increase would be phased in gradually and would rise with inflation. On Oct. 1, the minimum wage jumped to $11.60 per hour, and it will increase again Jan. 1, 201, to $14 per hour.

During a roundtable event earlier this summer by the Flamborough Chamber of Commerce, Hamilton small business owners told Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin the increase was too much, too fast. A few business owners said they would have to cut hours or even lay off staff because of the extra labour cost.

The Ontario Federation of Agriculture said in a statement earlier this year the minimum wage hike would impact youth employment, make farmers less competitive and threaten food security and the sustainability of agriculture products available to Ontario consumers.

Flynn said the Ontario government is ready to work with both agriculture representatives and the business community to deal with the higher minimum wage’s impact.

Progressive Conservative leader Patrick Brown has stated the transition period to the $15 an hour minimum wage should be extended.

The Ontario Chamber of Commerce and Retail Council of Canada have stated Ontario could lose 185,000 jobs because of the higher minimum wage.,

The province’s economic watchdog, the Financial Accountability Office, projects the minimum wage increase would see more than 50,000 people lose their jobs, predominately teens and young adults.

Flynn said despite the “dueling economists,” examples of higher minimum wage increases implemented in parts of the United States and British Columbia have “seen economic growth the following year.”

Flynn said critics are “underestimating the impact of the injection of the money” from people earning a higher minimum wage.

Also part of Bill 148 legislation — employers will have to provide workers with more certainty in scheduling; provide temporary or part-time workers with the same wage as full-time workers in an effort to reduce a company’s reliance on temporary workers; provide additional vacation days;  extend personal leave; and make it easier for people to unionize.

Bill 148 is currently being reviewed by an all-party committee. Flynn wants the bill to be passed this fall so the minimum wage increase can take effect Jan. 1, 2018.