Dundas Museum puts call out for gardening volunteers

News Sep 09, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

After significant rejuvenation of landscaping on the Dundas Museum and Archives property, the museum is now looking for new volunteers to help maintain the gardens.

Helping oversee the effort is collections assistant Severine Craig, who joined the museum full-time ten months ago and recently added the additional role of volunteer co-ordinator.

"You didn't realize how stagnant the old landscaping was," Craig said. "Now it's more welcoming. The paths and gardens welcome you to come right up."

But with fall approaching, the gardens need ongoing maintenance, weeding and winter preparation. The new gardens cover an extensive area around the front, side and back of the property and the single gardening volunteer currently working on it won't be enough.

Museum curator and general manager Kevin Puddister said this is a good opportunity for seniors living in apartments or condos who used to enjoy gardening, but don't have the space anymore.

Puddister said the rejuvenation started in May. Flower beds with native plant species were installed, along with new sod. University of Guelph landscape architecture grad Natalie Jarvis donated her services to design the plantings and pathways, and the project was completed by Sunny Skies Property Services. A sprinkler system was partially donated and installed by 8 Days a Week Sprinklers.

"It came out better than anyone envisioned," Puddister said. "One of the goals that was given to Natalie was to keep it fairly perimeter to allow green space for activities and events."

Craig suggested the new landscaping helps differentiate the museum from the surrounding residential homes. It identifies something different is happening there.

Also supporting that goal is addition of the 113-year-old punching and shearing machine, originally made at Dundas' Bertram & Sons, to the museum landscape near the corner of Park Street West and Albert Street.

When she heard the five ton historic piece of industrial equipment was coming, Craig wasn't really sure what the museum was about to receive. Now the industrial "sculpture" is bringing curious passersby into the museum to find out what it is — and learn more about the museum itself.

Built in 1904 in Dundas by Bertram, the industrial machine was sold to Goldie McCulloch Co., later Babcock and Wilcox, and used into the 1980s at their Northworks plant in Cambridge. It was moved to the company's former Southworks after that building was turned into an outlet mall in the 1990s.

When Southworks Mall was recently closing, Puddister cold-called them to say the museum was interested in the punching and shearing machine if there was no set plan for it.

"Essentially the response was, come and get it," Puddister said.

Ken Beal of Dundas Valley Sunrise Rotary Club, and a passionate supporter of Dundas' industrial history, organized a team and arranged for a concrete foundation and a crane to place the machine in its new home.

"Industry is the reason Dundas is here, and it's not really apparent," Puddister said. "It's important to remember."

For more information on the Dundas Museum and Archives, and volunteer opportunities there, drop by the museum at 139 Park St. W. or visit its website at www.dundasmuseum.ca


Dundas Museum puts call out for gardening volunteers

New landscaping features help centre of Valley Town history stand out

News Sep 09, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

After significant rejuvenation of landscaping on the Dundas Museum and Archives property, the museum is now looking for new volunteers to help maintain the gardens.

Helping oversee the effort is collections assistant Severine Craig, who joined the museum full-time ten months ago and recently added the additional role of volunteer co-ordinator.

"You didn't realize how stagnant the old landscaping was," Craig said. "Now it's more welcoming. The paths and gardens welcome you to come right up."

But with fall approaching, the gardens need ongoing maintenance, weeding and winter preparation. The new gardens cover an extensive area around the front, side and back of the property and the single gardening volunteer currently working on it won't be enough.

Museum curator and general manager Kevin Puddister said this is a good opportunity for seniors living in apartments or condos who used to enjoy gardening, but don't have the space anymore.

Puddister said the rejuvenation started in May. Flower beds with native plant species were installed, along with new sod. University of Guelph landscape architecture grad Natalie Jarvis donated her services to design the plantings and pathways, and the project was completed by Sunny Skies Property Services. A sprinkler system was partially donated and installed by 8 Days a Week Sprinklers.

"It came out better than anyone envisioned," Puddister said. "One of the goals that was given to Natalie was to keep it fairly perimeter to allow green space for activities and events."

Craig suggested the new landscaping helps differentiate the museum from the surrounding residential homes. It identifies something different is happening there.

Also supporting that goal is addition of the 113-year-old punching and shearing machine, originally made at Dundas' Bertram & Sons, to the museum landscape near the corner of Park Street West and Albert Street.

When she heard the five ton historic piece of industrial equipment was coming, Craig wasn't really sure what the museum was about to receive. Now the industrial "sculpture" is bringing curious passersby into the museum to find out what it is — and learn more about the museum itself.

Built in 1904 in Dundas by Bertram, the industrial machine was sold to Goldie McCulloch Co., later Babcock and Wilcox, and used into the 1980s at their Northworks plant in Cambridge. It was moved to the company's former Southworks after that building was turned into an outlet mall in the 1990s.

When Southworks Mall was recently closing, Puddister cold-called them to say the museum was interested in the punching and shearing machine if there was no set plan for it.

"Essentially the response was, come and get it," Puddister said.

Ken Beal of Dundas Valley Sunrise Rotary Club, and a passionate supporter of Dundas' industrial history, organized a team and arranged for a concrete foundation and a crane to place the machine in its new home.

"Industry is the reason Dundas is here, and it's not really apparent," Puddister said. "It's important to remember."

For more information on the Dundas Museum and Archives, and volunteer opportunities there, drop by the museum at 139 Park St. W. or visit its website at www.dundasmuseum.ca


Dundas Museum puts call out for gardening volunteers

New landscaping features help centre of Valley Town history stand out

News Sep 09, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

After significant rejuvenation of landscaping on the Dundas Museum and Archives property, the museum is now looking for new volunteers to help maintain the gardens.

Helping oversee the effort is collections assistant Severine Craig, who joined the museum full-time ten months ago and recently added the additional role of volunteer co-ordinator.

"You didn't realize how stagnant the old landscaping was," Craig said. "Now it's more welcoming. The paths and gardens welcome you to come right up."

But with fall approaching, the gardens need ongoing maintenance, weeding and winter preparation. The new gardens cover an extensive area around the front, side and back of the property and the single gardening volunteer currently working on it won't be enough.

Museum curator and general manager Kevin Puddister said this is a good opportunity for seniors living in apartments or condos who used to enjoy gardening, but don't have the space anymore.

Puddister said the rejuvenation started in May. Flower beds with native plant species were installed, along with new sod. University of Guelph landscape architecture grad Natalie Jarvis donated her services to design the plantings and pathways, and the project was completed by Sunny Skies Property Services. A sprinkler system was partially donated and installed by 8 Days a Week Sprinklers.

"It came out better than anyone envisioned," Puddister said. "One of the goals that was given to Natalie was to keep it fairly perimeter to allow green space for activities and events."

Craig suggested the new landscaping helps differentiate the museum from the surrounding residential homes. It identifies something different is happening there.

Also supporting that goal is addition of the 113-year-old punching and shearing machine, originally made at Dundas' Bertram & Sons, to the museum landscape near the corner of Park Street West and Albert Street.

When she heard the five ton historic piece of industrial equipment was coming, Craig wasn't really sure what the museum was about to receive. Now the industrial "sculpture" is bringing curious passersby into the museum to find out what it is — and learn more about the museum itself.

Built in 1904 in Dundas by Bertram, the industrial machine was sold to Goldie McCulloch Co., later Babcock and Wilcox, and used into the 1980s at their Northworks plant in Cambridge. It was moved to the company's former Southworks after that building was turned into an outlet mall in the 1990s.

When Southworks Mall was recently closing, Puddister cold-called them to say the museum was interested in the punching and shearing machine if there was no set plan for it.

"Essentially the response was, come and get it," Puddister said.

Ken Beal of Dundas Valley Sunrise Rotary Club, and a passionate supporter of Dundas' industrial history, organized a team and arranged for a concrete foundation and a crane to place the machine in its new home.

"Industry is the reason Dundas is here, and it's not really apparent," Puddister said. "It's important to remember."

For more information on the Dundas Museum and Archives, and volunteer opportunities there, drop by the museum at 139 Park St. W. or visit its website at www.dundasmuseum.ca