10 more trespass tickets at Albion Falls despite 215m of new fence, 30 signs

News Aug 08, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Signs warning the public not to go into the Albion Falls gorge are in place, but not everyone is listening.

Over the weekend, dozens of people could still be seen around the bottom of the popular waterfall, many of them posting images to social media confirming they had made the trek.

On Monday, 10 people needed to be helped out of the gorge by firefighters after a torrent of water came down the waterfall during a heavy downpour. One person was taken to hospital with minor injuries.

Around 1 p.m. Monday, about half an hour before the Albion Falls rescue call, firefighters were called to the bottom of Chedoke Falls where a family of five was trapped by rushing water. The Hamilton police marine unit assisted in the rescue. There were no reported injuries. Sunday evening, an elderly woman had to be rescued by firefighters after she was unable to get back up to street level.

A city spokeswoman said bylaw officers laid 10 trespassing charges over the weekend. The group that had to be rescued Monday was not charged because they hiked into the gorge on an unsanctioned trail did not jump a fence to get there.

While “No Access” and “Stay on Marked Trail” signs have been installed on the well-worn path that leads to the gorge, signs that say “No public access” are being installed this week. After that, trespassing charges may be laid against anyone ventures to the bottom of the falls.

“There is no safe access to the bottom of Albion Falls, and visitors should not enter the water; swimming at the bottom of the falls is prohibited,” the city advised in a press release at the start of the long weekend.

The top of the Albion Falls gorge is nearly completely fenced off now, with 215 metres of new fence being added since mid-July.

To combat those who hop fences or scoot under them, brush and branches have been used as a barrier.

“We did trim back and remove parts of some of the trees to open up sight lines from the safe viewing platforms, including some dead or dying trees in the area,” said parks manager Kara Bunn.

“We’ve also used some branches and brush to block off unsanctioned footpaths so visitors don’t get confused about where it’s safe to go.”

The city began fencing and charging trespassers after a photographer fell to his death in the gorge in June. There have been two accidental deaths and numerous rescue calls to Albion since July 2016.

10 more trespass tickets at Albion Falls despite 215m of new fence, 30 signs

'No public access' signs going up to keep people from using unsanctioned trail

News Aug 08, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Signs warning the public not to go into the Albion Falls gorge are in place, but not everyone is listening.

Over the weekend, dozens of people could still be seen around the bottom of the popular waterfall, many of them posting images to social media confirming they had made the trek.

On Monday, 10 people needed to be helped out of the gorge by firefighters after a torrent of water came down the waterfall during a heavy downpour. One person was taken to hospital with minor injuries.

Around 1 p.m. Monday, about half an hour before the Albion Falls rescue call, firefighters were called to the bottom of Chedoke Falls where a family of five was trapped by rushing water. The Hamilton police marine unit assisted in the rescue. There were no reported injuries. Sunday evening, an elderly woman had to be rescued by firefighters after she was unable to get back up to street level.

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A city spokeswoman said bylaw officers laid 10 trespassing charges over the weekend. The group that had to be rescued Monday was not charged because they hiked into the gorge on an unsanctioned trail did not jump a fence to get there.

While “No Access” and “Stay on Marked Trail” signs have been installed on the well-worn path that leads to the gorge, signs that say “No public access” are being installed this week. After that, trespassing charges may be laid against anyone ventures to the bottom of the falls.

“There is no safe access to the bottom of Albion Falls, and visitors should not enter the water; swimming at the bottom of the falls is prohibited,” the city advised in a press release at the start of the long weekend.

The top of the Albion Falls gorge is nearly completely fenced off now, with 215 metres of new fence being added since mid-July.

To combat those who hop fences or scoot under them, brush and branches have been used as a barrier.

“We did trim back and remove parts of some of the trees to open up sight lines from the safe viewing platforms, including some dead or dying trees in the area,” said parks manager Kara Bunn.

“We’ve also used some branches and brush to block off unsanctioned footpaths so visitors don’t get confused about where it’s safe to go.”

The city began fencing and charging trespassers after a photographer fell to his death in the gorge in June. There have been two accidental deaths and numerous rescue calls to Albion since July 2016.

10 more trespass tickets at Albion Falls despite 215m of new fence, 30 signs

'No public access' signs going up to keep people from using unsanctioned trail

News Aug 08, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Signs warning the public not to go into the Albion Falls gorge are in place, but not everyone is listening.

Over the weekend, dozens of people could still be seen around the bottom of the popular waterfall, many of them posting images to social media confirming they had made the trek.

On Monday, 10 people needed to be helped out of the gorge by firefighters after a torrent of water came down the waterfall during a heavy downpour. One person was taken to hospital with minor injuries.

Around 1 p.m. Monday, about half an hour before the Albion Falls rescue call, firefighters were called to the bottom of Chedoke Falls where a family of five was trapped by rushing water. The Hamilton police marine unit assisted in the rescue. There were no reported injuries. Sunday evening, an elderly woman had to be rescued by firefighters after she was unable to get back up to street level.

Related Content

A city spokeswoman said bylaw officers laid 10 trespassing charges over the weekend. The group that had to be rescued Monday was not charged because they hiked into the gorge on an unsanctioned trail did not jump a fence to get there.

While “No Access” and “Stay on Marked Trail” signs have been installed on the well-worn path that leads to the gorge, signs that say “No public access” are being installed this week. After that, trespassing charges may be laid against anyone ventures to the bottom of the falls.

“There is no safe access to the bottom of Albion Falls, and visitors should not enter the water; swimming at the bottom of the falls is prohibited,” the city advised in a press release at the start of the long weekend.

The top of the Albion Falls gorge is nearly completely fenced off now, with 215 metres of new fence being added since mid-July.

To combat those who hop fences or scoot under them, brush and branches have been used as a barrier.

“We did trim back and remove parts of some of the trees to open up sight lines from the safe viewing platforms, including some dead or dying trees in the area,” said parks manager Kara Bunn.

“We’ve also used some branches and brush to block off unsanctioned footpaths so visitors don’t get confused about where it’s safe to go.”

The city began fencing and charging trespassers after a photographer fell to his death in the gorge in June. There have been two accidental deaths and numerous rescue calls to Albion since July 2016.