Fewer Albion Falls bylaw scofflaws with enforcement blitz

News Jul 24, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Fences and bylaw officers standing guard at Albion Falls seems to be doing the trick.

Since being nearly surrounded by chain link fence and with officers discouraging anyone from trying, the number of people entering the gorge has been kept to a minimum.

Six trespassing tickets, each carrying a $135 fine, have been handed out since officers started patrolling the area regularly.

But some out-of-town visitors are confused to find the beautiful cascade they had seen photos of on the internet no longer accessible.

“I’m a little disappointed to see it’s fenced off,” said Zohra Martone of Toronto.

She and a friend were visiting after seeing photos friends had taken from the base of the falls.

Martone said she was disappointed to be relegated to the viewing platforms more than a football field away from the rushing water.

“A few people have ruined it for everyone,” she said.

After two deaths and more than a dozen rescues in the Albion Falls gorge in less than 12 months, including a death and four rescues in June alone, the city began an aggressive push to keep people at the top of the gorge. Officials want visitors to use two viewing platforms on the north side.

Since $50,000 worth of fence and warning signs were put up to nearly seal off the gorge, the number of people around the base of the falls has dropped dramatically.

While many people two weekends ago simply walked around the end of the fence and then down the embankment, most visitors to the falls seem to be obeying the rules now, thanks to a combination of visible enforcement and brush and dead tree branches placed on the inside of the fence as an added discouragement.

Most have been going to the steep cliff on the east side facing the waterfall known as Lover’s Leap. Another $25,000 worth of fencing is to be erected there to ensure people stay back from the sheer rock face.

Signs noting “No exit” and “Stay on marked trail” are also being put in place on the Bruce Trail in the Red Hill valley, where many hikers use an informal trail to make their way into the gorge.

There were two rescue calls last week, but police and fire officials said the two people did not jump any fence. In one case, a woman suffered a medical issue while hiking near the gorge and could not get back to where she started. In the other, a hiker suffered a shoulder injury while walking on a trail east of the gorge and needed medical assistance. The hiker was helped out of the gorge by firefighters.


Fewer Albion Falls bylaw scofflaws with enforcement blitz

Six trespassing tickets handed out at Hamilton waterfall

News Jul 24, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Fences and bylaw officers standing guard at Albion Falls seems to be doing the trick.

Since being nearly surrounded by chain link fence and with officers discouraging anyone from trying, the number of people entering the gorge has been kept to a minimum.

Six trespassing tickets, each carrying a $135 fine, have been handed out since officers started patrolling the area regularly.

But some out-of-town visitors are confused to find the beautiful cascade they had seen photos of on the internet no longer accessible.

Related Content

“I’m a little disappointed to see it’s fenced off,” said Zohra Martone of Toronto.

She and a friend were visiting after seeing photos friends had taken from the base of the falls.

Martone said she was disappointed to be relegated to the viewing platforms more than a football field away from the rushing water.

“A few people have ruined it for everyone,” she said.

After two deaths and more than a dozen rescues in the Albion Falls gorge in less than 12 months, including a death and four rescues in June alone, the city began an aggressive push to keep people at the top of the gorge. Officials want visitors to use two viewing platforms on the north side.

Since $50,000 worth of fence and warning signs were put up to nearly seal off the gorge, the number of people around the base of the falls has dropped dramatically.

While many people two weekends ago simply walked around the end of the fence and then down the embankment, most visitors to the falls seem to be obeying the rules now, thanks to a combination of visible enforcement and brush and dead tree branches placed on the inside of the fence as an added discouragement.

Most have been going to the steep cliff on the east side facing the waterfall known as Lover’s Leap. Another $25,000 worth of fencing is to be erected there to ensure people stay back from the sheer rock face.

Signs noting “No exit” and “Stay on marked trail” are also being put in place on the Bruce Trail in the Red Hill valley, where many hikers use an informal trail to make their way into the gorge.

There were two rescue calls last week, but police and fire officials said the two people did not jump any fence. In one case, a woman suffered a medical issue while hiking near the gorge and could not get back to where she started. In the other, a hiker suffered a shoulder injury while walking on a trail east of the gorge and needed medical assistance. The hiker was helped out of the gorge by firefighters.


Fewer Albion Falls bylaw scofflaws with enforcement blitz

Six trespassing tickets handed out at Hamilton waterfall

News Jul 24, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Fences and bylaw officers standing guard at Albion Falls seems to be doing the trick.

Since being nearly surrounded by chain link fence and with officers discouraging anyone from trying, the number of people entering the gorge has been kept to a minimum.

Six trespassing tickets, each carrying a $135 fine, have been handed out since officers started patrolling the area regularly.

But some out-of-town visitors are confused to find the beautiful cascade they had seen photos of on the internet no longer accessible.

Related Content

“I’m a little disappointed to see it’s fenced off,” said Zohra Martone of Toronto.

She and a friend were visiting after seeing photos friends had taken from the base of the falls.

Martone said she was disappointed to be relegated to the viewing platforms more than a football field away from the rushing water.

“A few people have ruined it for everyone,” she said.

After two deaths and more than a dozen rescues in the Albion Falls gorge in less than 12 months, including a death and four rescues in June alone, the city began an aggressive push to keep people at the top of the gorge. Officials want visitors to use two viewing platforms on the north side.

Since $50,000 worth of fence and warning signs were put up to nearly seal off the gorge, the number of people around the base of the falls has dropped dramatically.

While many people two weekends ago simply walked around the end of the fence and then down the embankment, most visitors to the falls seem to be obeying the rules now, thanks to a combination of visible enforcement and brush and dead tree branches placed on the inside of the fence as an added discouragement.

Most have been going to the steep cliff on the east side facing the waterfall known as Lover’s Leap. Another $25,000 worth of fencing is to be erected there to ensure people stay back from the sheer rock face.

Signs noting “No exit” and “Stay on marked trail” are also being put in place on the Bruce Trail in the Red Hill valley, where many hikers use an informal trail to make their way into the gorge.

There were two rescue calls last week, but police and fire officials said the two people did not jump any fence. In one case, a woman suffered a medical issue while hiking near the gorge and could not get back to where she started. In the other, a hiker suffered a shoulder injury while walking on a trail east of the gorge and needed medical assistance. The hiker was helped out of the gorge by firefighters.