HBSPCA to celebrate 130 years with major upgrade

News Jul 26, 2017 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

A major facelift is being contemplated for the Hamilton/Burlington SPCA’s Dartnall Road shelter.

Local chief executive officer Marion Emo said the dog and cat kennels, administration offices and building facade are all being considered for renovations.

They are also looking at the need for more public space for humane education.

“We hope to have a plan ready for public sharing at the end of October,” she said. “It would be fair to say (the cost is) probably over $1 million.”

There are 22 dog kennels and 53 cat kennels at the shelter.

The organization recently marked its 130th anniversary, including more than 20 years on Dartnall Road.

Emo said the dog kennels were considered state-of-the-art when the east-Mountain building opened, but not any more, noting they are not easily accessible for the dogs or for staff and volunteers to manage.

“We are now beginning to mock up designs,” said Emo.

She said she expects a fundraising campaign to pay for the upgrades will also be announced in the fall.

The Hamilton Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was formed on April 1, 1887 in the chambers of Hamilton Mayor Alexander McKay.

It originally focused on the well-being of horses, dogs and other working animals on farms.

The Hamilton SPCA opened a shelter on Parkdale Avenue in 1948 and remained there until moving to a new state-of-the-art shelter in 1996.

A companion animal hospital was erected in 2009. It became the Hamilton/Burlington SPCA in 2012.

Last year, the organization provided more than 4,000 spay and neuter surgeries to cats and dogs, the most ever, and some 1,900 low-income cat owners had the surgery subsidized by PetSmart charities.

About 2,000 dogs, cats and other animals (such as rabbits and guinea pigs) from the shelter find new homes each year.

Emo said Hamilton continues to have an overpopulation of cats and she encourages cat and dog owners to have their pets fixed.

HBSPCA to celebrate 130 years with major upgrade

Officials expect to have plan ready in the fall

News Jul 26, 2017 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

A major facelift is being contemplated for the Hamilton/Burlington SPCA’s Dartnall Road shelter.

Local chief executive officer Marion Emo said the dog and cat kennels, administration offices and building facade are all being considered for renovations.

They are also looking at the need for more public space for humane education.

“We hope to have a plan ready for public sharing at the end of October,” she said. “It would be fair to say (the cost is) probably over $1 million.”

There are 22 dog kennels and 53 cat kennels at the shelter.

The organization recently marked its 130th anniversary, including more than 20 years on Dartnall Road.

Emo said the dog kennels were considered state-of-the-art when the east-Mountain building opened, but not any more, noting they are not easily accessible for the dogs or for staff and volunteers to manage.

“We are now beginning to mock up designs,” said Emo.

She said she expects a fundraising campaign to pay for the upgrades will also be announced in the fall.

The Hamilton Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was formed on April 1, 1887 in the chambers of Hamilton Mayor Alexander McKay.

It originally focused on the well-being of horses, dogs and other working animals on farms.

The Hamilton SPCA opened a shelter on Parkdale Avenue in 1948 and remained there until moving to a new state-of-the-art shelter in 1996.

A companion animal hospital was erected in 2009. It became the Hamilton/Burlington SPCA in 2012.

Last year, the organization provided more than 4,000 spay and neuter surgeries to cats and dogs, the most ever, and some 1,900 low-income cat owners had the surgery subsidized by PetSmart charities.

About 2,000 dogs, cats and other animals (such as rabbits and guinea pigs) from the shelter find new homes each year.

Emo said Hamilton continues to have an overpopulation of cats and she encourages cat and dog owners to have their pets fixed.

HBSPCA to celebrate 130 years with major upgrade

Officials expect to have plan ready in the fall

News Jul 26, 2017 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

A major facelift is being contemplated for the Hamilton/Burlington SPCA’s Dartnall Road shelter.

Local chief executive officer Marion Emo said the dog and cat kennels, administration offices and building facade are all being considered for renovations.

They are also looking at the need for more public space for humane education.

“We hope to have a plan ready for public sharing at the end of October,” she said. “It would be fair to say (the cost is) probably over $1 million.”

There are 22 dog kennels and 53 cat kennels at the shelter.

The organization recently marked its 130th anniversary, including more than 20 years on Dartnall Road.

Emo said the dog kennels were considered state-of-the-art when the east-Mountain building opened, but not any more, noting they are not easily accessible for the dogs or for staff and volunteers to manage.

“We are now beginning to mock up designs,” said Emo.

She said she expects a fundraising campaign to pay for the upgrades will also be announced in the fall.

The Hamilton Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was formed on April 1, 1887 in the chambers of Hamilton Mayor Alexander McKay.

It originally focused on the well-being of horses, dogs and other working animals on farms.

The Hamilton SPCA opened a shelter on Parkdale Avenue in 1948 and remained there until moving to a new state-of-the-art shelter in 1996.

A companion animal hospital was erected in 2009. It became the Hamilton/Burlington SPCA in 2012.

Last year, the organization provided more than 4,000 spay and neuter surgeries to cats and dogs, the most ever, and some 1,900 low-income cat owners had the surgery subsidized by PetSmart charities.

About 2,000 dogs, cats and other animals (such as rabbits and guinea pigs) from the shelter find new homes each year.

Emo said Hamilton continues to have an overpopulation of cats and she encourages cat and dog owners to have their pets fixed.