Woman rescued from Albion Falls gorge did not break law, say Hamilton police

News Jul 20, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

A woman who needed to be rescued from the Albion Falls gorge Wednesday night did not break any laws, Hamilton police say.

Hamilton firefighters were called around 8:30 p.m. for a medical call. Seven trucks and crews, along with police and paramedics, were eventually called to perform a rope rescue, the seventh this year, to bring the woman up the north gorge.

The female hiker "experienced symptoms due to an unrelated medical condition that required her to be rescued," said Hamilton police Const. Jerome Stewart in a media release. "This was not a police matter and there is no evidence to support the hiker contravened the posted bylaw."

For much of Wednesday, two city bylaw officers patrolled the area at the top of the falls, answering questions from hikers and ensuring no one tried to get around or over new fencing designed to keep people out of the gorge. Where normally dozens of people could be seen each hour at the base of the falls on a sunny day, few could be seen.

There have been two accidental deaths and numerous rescue calls at Albion Falls over the past 12 months. Last Friday, after a steady stream of people went around barriers erected by the city, councillors voted to start enforcing trespassing laws.

There is no signage at the bottom of the gorge to tell hikers who walk up through the valley to stay out, though "keep out" and other warning signs are expected to be installed soon.

Woman rescued from Albion Falls gorge did not break law, say Hamilton police

Medical condition, no evidence hiker jumped fence

News Jul 20, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

A woman who needed to be rescued from the Albion Falls gorge Wednesday night did not break any laws, Hamilton police say.

Hamilton firefighters were called around 8:30 p.m. for a medical call. Seven trucks and crews, along with police and paramedics, were eventually called to perform a rope rescue, the seventh this year, to bring the woman up the north gorge.

The female hiker "experienced symptoms due to an unrelated medical condition that required her to be rescued," said Hamilton police Const. Jerome Stewart in a media release. "This was not a police matter and there is no evidence to support the hiker contravened the posted bylaw."

For much of Wednesday, two city bylaw officers patrolled the area at the top of the falls, answering questions from hikers and ensuring no one tried to get around or over new fencing designed to keep people out of the gorge. Where normally dozens of people could be seen each hour at the base of the falls on a sunny day, few could be seen.

Related Content

There have been two accidental deaths and numerous rescue calls at Albion Falls over the past 12 months. Last Friday, after a steady stream of people went around barriers erected by the city, councillors voted to start enforcing trespassing laws.

There is no signage at the bottom of the gorge to tell hikers who walk up through the valley to stay out, though "keep out" and other warning signs are expected to be installed soon.

Woman rescued from Albion Falls gorge did not break law, say Hamilton police

Medical condition, no evidence hiker jumped fence

News Jul 20, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

A woman who needed to be rescued from the Albion Falls gorge Wednesday night did not break any laws, Hamilton police say.

Hamilton firefighters were called around 8:30 p.m. for a medical call. Seven trucks and crews, along with police and paramedics, were eventually called to perform a rope rescue, the seventh this year, to bring the woman up the north gorge.

The female hiker "experienced symptoms due to an unrelated medical condition that required her to be rescued," said Hamilton police Const. Jerome Stewart in a media release. "This was not a police matter and there is no evidence to support the hiker contravened the posted bylaw."

For much of Wednesday, two city bylaw officers patrolled the area at the top of the falls, answering questions from hikers and ensuring no one tried to get around or over new fencing designed to keep people out of the gorge. Where normally dozens of people could be seen each hour at the base of the falls on a sunny day, few could be seen.

Related Content

There have been two accidental deaths and numerous rescue calls at Albion Falls over the past 12 months. Last Friday, after a steady stream of people went around barriers erected by the city, councillors voted to start enforcing trespassing laws.

There is no signage at the bottom of the gorge to tell hikers who walk up through the valley to stay out, though "keep out" and other warning signs are expected to be installed soon.