Police tape ignored as visitors climb over warning to get closer to Albion Falls

News Jul 17, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Even police tape wasn’t stopping them from going down the gorge.

Many visitors to Albion Falls last weekend simply ignored the yellow tape — with the words 'Police line, do not cross’ — that was placed across a gap between new fencing and a steep embankment.

In many cases, they walked along the inside of the fence to a decommissioned staircase, also fenced off at the top and bottom, to make the first five metres of their descent down the 19-metre gorge a little easier.

Hamilton police spokesman Const. Jerome Stewart said police were called eight times to Albion Falls over the weekend, but he did not know of any charges being laid.

"On a positive note," he wrote in an email, "since there has been a substantial amount of media coverage, the community is more aware and passersby are now contacting police in the event they observe persons who they feel are in a compromising position surrounding the falls."

It was the first weekend following Hamilton city council’s decision to install no-trespassing signs on the newly installed black chain-link fences and get police and bylaw officers to start laying charges.

Forty-three tickets were handed out by bylaw officers last weekend at Albion Falls for parking violations. A spokeswoman said officers were on site Monday afternoon to get the lay of the land and work out how they would be enforcing the law on trespassers.

Two people have died over the last year and there have been numerous rescues performed at Albion Falls as an increasing number of tourists flock to the area.

East Mountain Coun. Tom Jackson said, despite a steady stream of people flouting the rules, there are many people who saw the fence and signage and were deterred from going down the gorge.

“With the fencing up — and I’ve witnessed it on several occasions — it’s causing a pause among people and families to not jeopardize their own safety and stay on the proper side of the fence,” he said Monday. “To me there’s been a measure of success already.”

Jackson said he will continue to look for ways the public can safely view Albion Falls from a closer vantage point. He has asked staff to inquire about money from the Hamilton Future Fund for lookout platforms at three possible sites — the Lover’s Leap cliff facing the falls, a spot close to the cascade and a staircase to allow safe access down into the gorge.

Those who did obey the fence and police tape last weekend generally went further east to the cliff across from the falls — and ignored an orange snow fence on the path and a keep out sign to get there.

Construction of a chain-link fence in that area, known as Lover’s Leap because of an ancient legend and sheer rock face, could begin this week, said Jackson.

The fence will run along an old guard rail at the top of the cliff, keeping people about 10 feet back from the edge but still allowing a view of the falls, said Jackson.

Police tape ignored as visitors climb over warning to get closer to Albion Falls

It was the first weekend following Hamilton city council’s decision to install No trespassing signs

News Jul 17, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Even police tape wasn’t stopping them from going down the gorge.

Many visitors to Albion Falls last weekend simply ignored the yellow tape — with the words 'Police line, do not cross’ — that was placed across a gap between new fencing and a steep embankment.

In many cases, they walked along the inside of the fence to a decommissioned staircase, also fenced off at the top and bottom, to make the first five metres of their descent down the 19-metre gorge a little easier.

Hamilton police spokesman Const. Jerome Stewart said police were called eight times to Albion Falls over the weekend, but he did not know of any charges being laid.

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"On a positive note," he wrote in an email, "since there has been a substantial amount of media coverage, the community is more aware and passersby are now contacting police in the event they observe persons who they feel are in a compromising position surrounding the falls."

It was the first weekend following Hamilton city council’s decision to install no-trespassing signs on the newly installed black chain-link fences and get police and bylaw officers to start laying charges.

Forty-three tickets were handed out by bylaw officers last weekend at Albion Falls for parking violations. A spokeswoman said officers were on site Monday afternoon to get the lay of the land and work out how they would be enforcing the law on trespassers.

Two people have died over the last year and there have been numerous rescues performed at Albion Falls as an increasing number of tourists flock to the area.

East Mountain Coun. Tom Jackson said, despite a steady stream of people flouting the rules, there are many people who saw the fence and signage and were deterred from going down the gorge.

“With the fencing up — and I’ve witnessed it on several occasions — it’s causing a pause among people and families to not jeopardize their own safety and stay on the proper side of the fence,” he said Monday. “To me there’s been a measure of success already.”

Jackson said he will continue to look for ways the public can safely view Albion Falls from a closer vantage point. He has asked staff to inquire about money from the Hamilton Future Fund for lookout platforms at three possible sites — the Lover’s Leap cliff facing the falls, a spot close to the cascade and a staircase to allow safe access down into the gorge.

Those who did obey the fence and police tape last weekend generally went further east to the cliff across from the falls — and ignored an orange snow fence on the path and a keep out sign to get there.

Construction of a chain-link fence in that area, known as Lover’s Leap because of an ancient legend and sheer rock face, could begin this week, said Jackson.

The fence will run along an old guard rail at the top of the cliff, keeping people about 10 feet back from the edge but still allowing a view of the falls, said Jackson.

Police tape ignored as visitors climb over warning to get closer to Albion Falls

It was the first weekend following Hamilton city council’s decision to install No trespassing signs

News Jul 17, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Even police tape wasn’t stopping them from going down the gorge.

Many visitors to Albion Falls last weekend simply ignored the yellow tape — with the words 'Police line, do not cross’ — that was placed across a gap between new fencing and a steep embankment.

In many cases, they walked along the inside of the fence to a decommissioned staircase, also fenced off at the top and bottom, to make the first five metres of their descent down the 19-metre gorge a little easier.

Hamilton police spokesman Const. Jerome Stewart said police were called eight times to Albion Falls over the weekend, but he did not know of any charges being laid.

Related Content

"On a positive note," he wrote in an email, "since there has been a substantial amount of media coverage, the community is more aware and passersby are now contacting police in the event they observe persons who they feel are in a compromising position surrounding the falls."

It was the first weekend following Hamilton city council’s decision to install no-trespassing signs on the newly installed black chain-link fences and get police and bylaw officers to start laying charges.

Forty-three tickets were handed out by bylaw officers last weekend at Albion Falls for parking violations. A spokeswoman said officers were on site Monday afternoon to get the lay of the land and work out how they would be enforcing the law on trespassers.

Two people have died over the last year and there have been numerous rescues performed at Albion Falls as an increasing number of tourists flock to the area.

East Mountain Coun. Tom Jackson said, despite a steady stream of people flouting the rules, there are many people who saw the fence and signage and were deterred from going down the gorge.

“With the fencing up — and I’ve witnessed it on several occasions — it’s causing a pause among people and families to not jeopardize their own safety and stay on the proper side of the fence,” he said Monday. “To me there’s been a measure of success already.”

Jackson said he will continue to look for ways the public can safely view Albion Falls from a closer vantage point. He has asked staff to inquire about money from the Hamilton Future Fund for lookout platforms at three possible sites — the Lover’s Leap cliff facing the falls, a spot close to the cascade and a staircase to allow safe access down into the gorge.

Those who did obey the fence and police tape last weekend generally went further east to the cliff across from the falls — and ignored an orange snow fence on the path and a keep out sign to get there.

Construction of a chain-link fence in that area, known as Lover’s Leap because of an ancient legend and sheer rock face, could begin this week, said Jackson.

The fence will run along an old guard rail at the top of the cliff, keeping people about 10 feet back from the edge but still allowing a view of the falls, said Jackson.