Ontario’s energy minister says Tories are without a plan for cutting hydro costs

News Jul 17, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Ontario Energy Minister Glenn Thibeault called the Tories’ proposal to restrict selling electricity to nearby provinces and the United States and instead divert the excess power to local businesses so they can create jobs “back-of-the-napkin” thinking.

“It is no wonder they don’t want to release a (hydro) plan,” said Thibeault in a statement.

The energy minister was reacting to an interview Hamilton Community News had with Nipissing Tory MPP Vic Fedeli in June, who pilloried the Liberals’ hydro strategy.

Fedeli in a speech and later in an interview castigated the Liberals’ Fair Hydro Plan that took effect July 1 that they say will cut hydro rates by on average 25 per cent annually. The Tories, he said, would eliminate the Liberals’ Green Energy contracts, reduce Hydro One officials’ salaries, and halt the province from selling excess electricity to Quebec and other U.S. states, such as New York, Pennsylvania and Michigan.

“Essentially, (Fedeli) suggested Ontario should build a wall, banning all electricity exports,” said Thibeault.

The Tories are not the only ones that have criticized the province for subsidizing the dumping of cheap electricity to neighbouring states and provinces. The NDP said the province in 2012 paid $1 billion to export electricity to Quebec and a number of U.S. states.

In 2012 the Council for Clean and Reliable Electricity published a paper stating that Ontario consumers subsidized out-of-province electricity buyers estimated to be about $1.2 billion over the previous three years.

Thibeault said Ontario “doesn’t have sufficient electricity demand at home to use up the electricity we export to other markets.”

He said Fedeli’s idea would mean building expensive infrastructure to “soak up this energy” and eventually make for “poor” long-term planning.

He said Ontario only exports excess electricity “when it’s economically viable and presents a benefit to our electricity system.”

Thibeault, citing the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO), said exporting excess electricity has “lowered costs” to the province’s hydro system by between $200 million and $300 million every year since 2013, ultimately benefiting Ontario’s consumers.

“Ontario makes use of strategy exports on a frequent basis to maintain the reliability of our grid and to keep costs low,” said Thibeault.

Thibeault went on to say the Conservatives “have consistently opposed our efforts” to improve the province’s electricity system over the last 15 years. He said the Tories voted against the Fair Hydro Plan that will provide “the largest cut to electricity rates in Ontario’s history.

“It’s clear the Conservatives still have no plan for energy in this province,” stated Thibeault.

Ontario Tory Leader Patrick Brown told a crowd of business people at a June lunch meeting in Burlington that if elected in next year’s provincial election “I will fix this (hydro) mess.”

Brown said he will stop subsidizing excess electricity to nearby provinces and U.S. states, cut Hydro One executive salaries and reveal “secret” energy contracts that have been signed by the province. But Brown did not say when his party will release its own hydro plan to reduce electricity rates, something the Liberals and NDP have already done.

 

Ontario’s energy minister says Tories are without a plan for cutting hydro costs

About $200-300M saved each year

News Jul 17, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Ontario Energy Minister Glenn Thibeault called the Tories’ proposal to restrict selling electricity to nearby provinces and the United States and instead divert the excess power to local businesses so they can create jobs “back-of-the-napkin” thinking.

“It is no wonder they don’t want to release a (hydro) plan,” said Thibeault in a statement.

The energy minister was reacting to an interview Hamilton Community News had with Nipissing Tory MPP Vic Fedeli in June, who pilloried the Liberals’ hydro strategy.

Fedeli in a speech and later in an interview castigated the Liberals’ Fair Hydro Plan that took effect July 1 that they say will cut hydro rates by on average 25 per cent annually. The Tories, he said, would eliminate the Liberals’ Green Energy contracts, reduce Hydro One officials’ salaries, and halt the province from selling excess electricity to Quebec and other U.S. states, such as New York, Pennsylvania and Michigan.

“Essentially, (Fedeli) suggested Ontario should build a wall, banning all electricity exports,” said Thibeault.

The Tories are not the only ones that have criticized the province for subsidizing the dumping of cheap electricity to neighbouring states and provinces. The NDP said the province in 2012 paid $1 billion to export electricity to Quebec and a number of U.S. states.

In 2012 the Council for Clean and Reliable Electricity published a paper stating that Ontario consumers subsidized out-of-province electricity buyers estimated to be about $1.2 billion over the previous three years.

Thibeault said Ontario “doesn’t have sufficient electricity demand at home to use up the electricity we export to other markets.”

He said Fedeli’s idea would mean building expensive infrastructure to “soak up this energy” and eventually make for “poor” long-term planning.

He said Ontario only exports excess electricity “when it’s economically viable and presents a benefit to our electricity system.”

Thibeault, citing the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO), said exporting excess electricity has “lowered costs” to the province’s hydro system by between $200 million and $300 million every year since 2013, ultimately benefiting Ontario’s consumers.

“Ontario makes use of strategy exports on a frequent basis to maintain the reliability of our grid and to keep costs low,” said Thibeault.

Thibeault went on to say the Conservatives “have consistently opposed our efforts” to improve the province’s electricity system over the last 15 years. He said the Tories voted against the Fair Hydro Plan that will provide “the largest cut to electricity rates in Ontario’s history.

“It’s clear the Conservatives still have no plan for energy in this province,” stated Thibeault.

Ontario Tory Leader Patrick Brown told a crowd of business people at a June lunch meeting in Burlington that if elected in next year’s provincial election “I will fix this (hydro) mess.”

Brown said he will stop subsidizing excess electricity to nearby provinces and U.S. states, cut Hydro One executive salaries and reveal “secret” energy contracts that have been signed by the province. But Brown did not say when his party will release its own hydro plan to reduce electricity rates, something the Liberals and NDP have already done.

 

Ontario’s energy minister says Tories are without a plan for cutting hydro costs

About $200-300M saved each year

News Jul 17, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Ontario Energy Minister Glenn Thibeault called the Tories’ proposal to restrict selling electricity to nearby provinces and the United States and instead divert the excess power to local businesses so they can create jobs “back-of-the-napkin” thinking.

“It is no wonder they don’t want to release a (hydro) plan,” said Thibeault in a statement.

The energy minister was reacting to an interview Hamilton Community News had with Nipissing Tory MPP Vic Fedeli in June, who pilloried the Liberals’ hydro strategy.

Fedeli in a speech and later in an interview castigated the Liberals’ Fair Hydro Plan that took effect July 1 that they say will cut hydro rates by on average 25 per cent annually. The Tories, he said, would eliminate the Liberals’ Green Energy contracts, reduce Hydro One officials’ salaries, and halt the province from selling excess electricity to Quebec and other U.S. states, such as New York, Pennsylvania and Michigan.

“Essentially, (Fedeli) suggested Ontario should build a wall, banning all electricity exports,” said Thibeault.

The Tories are not the only ones that have criticized the province for subsidizing the dumping of cheap electricity to neighbouring states and provinces. The NDP said the province in 2012 paid $1 billion to export electricity to Quebec and a number of U.S. states.

In 2012 the Council for Clean and Reliable Electricity published a paper stating that Ontario consumers subsidized out-of-province electricity buyers estimated to be about $1.2 billion over the previous three years.

Thibeault said Ontario “doesn’t have sufficient electricity demand at home to use up the electricity we export to other markets.”

He said Fedeli’s idea would mean building expensive infrastructure to “soak up this energy” and eventually make for “poor” long-term planning.

He said Ontario only exports excess electricity “when it’s economically viable and presents a benefit to our electricity system.”

Thibeault, citing the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO), said exporting excess electricity has “lowered costs” to the province’s hydro system by between $200 million and $300 million every year since 2013, ultimately benefiting Ontario’s consumers.

“Ontario makes use of strategy exports on a frequent basis to maintain the reliability of our grid and to keep costs low,” said Thibeault.

Thibeault went on to say the Conservatives “have consistently opposed our efforts” to improve the province’s electricity system over the last 15 years. He said the Tories voted against the Fair Hydro Plan that will provide “the largest cut to electricity rates in Ontario’s history.

“It’s clear the Conservatives still have no plan for energy in this province,” stated Thibeault.

Ontario Tory Leader Patrick Brown told a crowd of business people at a June lunch meeting in Burlington that if elected in next year’s provincial election “I will fix this (hydro) mess.”

Brown said he will stop subsidizing excess electricity to nearby provinces and U.S. states, cut Hydro One executive salaries and reveal “secret” energy contracts that have been signed by the province. But Brown did not say when his party will release its own hydro plan to reduce electricity rates, something the Liberals and NDP have already done.