Hamilton Port Authority shines light on proposed museum for lighthouse

News Jul 14, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Hamilton Port Authority is attempting to establish a maritime museum and interpretive centre at the Beach Canal Lighthouse.

Authority president Ian Hamilton and Beach Canal Lighthouse Group’s George Thomson said they will be speaking later this month to the federal government about the authority’s proposal.

“This is a really exciting thing,” Hamilton said. “We have this museum in our mind. (The volunteer group) was looking for support. So, we are working closely with them to secure the beach lighthouse and creating a museum and potentially an interpretive centre out there.”

Thomson said the volunteer group had been at an “impasse” with the federal government over trying to acquire the lighthouse located on Beach Boulevard. In 2004, the federal department of public works and government services declared the land where the 1858 light station is located and the keeper’s house as surplus. The group has attempted to acquire the lighthouse, but the federal government has refused to transfer the facility to the volunteer group.

In 2013, a licensing agreement was established between the federal government and the volunteer group to allow repairs to be made at the lighthouse.

Thomson, the vice-chair of the volunteer group, is the great-great-grandson of the Beach Canal Lighthouse keeper of the 1850s. He said the meeting with the federal government will focus on whether the authority’s proposal is a “viable plan.”

“It  looks promising,” said Thomson.

Hamilton said the authority has some ideas on managing the land where the lighthouse is located and how to turn the lighthouse into a museum.

He also said there is a “gap” in the area’s maritime history. With the closure of the Kingston Museum and the Toronto Maritime Museum, there could be an opportunity to highlight local and area history to the community.

The Toronto Maritime Museum closed in 2008, while the lease of the Marine Museum of the Great Lakes at Kingston expired last Dec. 31. Officials had stated they were looking at other locations, including Hamilton’s port, but characterized the discussions as “very preliminary.”

Hamilton said he has talked to representatives of the Kingston Museum about their situation.

“I think it would be great for Hamilton,” he said. “(A museum) would be a catalyst for future recreation development on Fisherman’s Pier. We are all full steam ahead.”

Hamilton Port Authority trumpets proposal to create museum at beach lighthouse

News Jul 14, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Hamilton Port Authority is attempting to establish a maritime museum and interpretive centre at the Beach Canal Lighthouse.

Authority president Ian Hamilton and Beach Canal Lighthouse Group’s George Thomson said they will be speaking later this month to the federal government about the authority’s proposal.

“This is a really exciting thing,” Hamilton said. “We have this museum in our mind. (The volunteer group) was looking for support. So, we are working closely with them to secure the beach lighthouse and creating a museum and potentially an interpretive centre out there.”

Thomson said the volunteer group had been at an “impasse” with the federal government over trying to acquire the lighthouse located on Beach Boulevard. In 2004, the federal department of public works and government services declared the land where the 1858 light station is located and the keeper’s house as surplus. The group has attempted to acquire the lighthouse, but the federal government has refused to transfer the facility to the volunteer group.

In 2013, a licensing agreement was established between the federal government and the volunteer group to allow repairs to be made at the lighthouse.

Thomson, the vice-chair of the volunteer group, is the great-great-grandson of the Beach Canal Lighthouse keeper of the 1850s. He said the meeting with the federal government will focus on whether the authority’s proposal is a “viable plan.”

“It  looks promising,” said Thomson.

Hamilton said the authority has some ideas on managing the land where the lighthouse is located and how to turn the lighthouse into a museum.

He also said there is a “gap” in the area’s maritime history. With the closure of the Kingston Museum and the Toronto Maritime Museum, there could be an opportunity to highlight local and area history to the community.

The Toronto Maritime Museum closed in 2008, while the lease of the Marine Museum of the Great Lakes at Kingston expired last Dec. 31. Officials had stated they were looking at other locations, including Hamilton’s port, but characterized the discussions as “very preliminary.”

Hamilton said he has talked to representatives of the Kingston Museum about their situation.

“I think it would be great for Hamilton,” he said. “(A museum) would be a catalyst for future recreation development on Fisherman’s Pier. We are all full steam ahead.”

Hamilton Port Authority trumpets proposal to create museum at beach lighthouse

News Jul 14, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Hamilton Port Authority is attempting to establish a maritime museum and interpretive centre at the Beach Canal Lighthouse.

Authority president Ian Hamilton and Beach Canal Lighthouse Group’s George Thomson said they will be speaking later this month to the federal government about the authority’s proposal.

“This is a really exciting thing,” Hamilton said. “We have this museum in our mind. (The volunteer group) was looking for support. So, we are working closely with them to secure the beach lighthouse and creating a museum and potentially an interpretive centre out there.”

Thomson said the volunteer group had been at an “impasse” with the federal government over trying to acquire the lighthouse located on Beach Boulevard. In 2004, the federal department of public works and government services declared the land where the 1858 light station is located and the keeper’s house as surplus. The group has attempted to acquire the lighthouse, but the federal government has refused to transfer the facility to the volunteer group.

In 2013, a licensing agreement was established between the federal government and the volunteer group to allow repairs to be made at the lighthouse.

Thomson, the vice-chair of the volunteer group, is the great-great-grandson of the Beach Canal Lighthouse keeper of the 1850s. He said the meeting with the federal government will focus on whether the authority’s proposal is a “viable plan.”

“It  looks promising,” said Thomson.

Hamilton said the authority has some ideas on managing the land where the lighthouse is located and how to turn the lighthouse into a museum.

He also said there is a “gap” in the area’s maritime history. With the closure of the Kingston Museum and the Toronto Maritime Museum, there could be an opportunity to highlight local and area history to the community.

The Toronto Maritime Museum closed in 2008, while the lease of the Marine Museum of the Great Lakes at Kingston expired last Dec. 31. Officials had stated they were looking at other locations, including Hamilton’s port, but characterized the discussions as “very preliminary.”

Hamilton said he has talked to representatives of the Kingston Museum about their situation.

“I think it would be great for Hamilton,” he said. “(A museum) would be a catalyst for future recreation development on Fisherman’s Pier. We are all full steam ahead.”