Hamilton to charge people for visiting Albion Falls

News Jul 13, 2017 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton will start laying charges against people who are trespassing at Albion Falls.

Politicians at their July 13 public works committee meeting gave the green-light for staff to install No trespassing signs on recently installed black chained link fences and get Hamilton Police and city officials to start laying charges. Typical fines for trespassing can be about $150, but councillors have asked that the fines be increased.

Once the signs are installed, which could be by the end of the month, enforcement on the no trespassing will begin, said east Mountain Coun. Tom Jackson.

Other signs that will be installed will feature ‘Do Not Climb Fencing’, ‘Stay on Marked Trails’, and ‘No Public Access.’

In addition, another $25,000 in new fencing from Jackson’s Ward 6 area rating fund will be installed around Albion Falls and Lovers’ Leap over the next week. The fencing will be up starting July 14 and continue until July 19.  Jackson has taken about $75,000 from his ward funding reserve to pay for the new fencing.

“I have been hesitant to do anything concrete up to now,” said Jackson, who represents the ward where Albion Falls is located.  “But we had to do something to stem the tide.”

Director of Licensing Ken Leendertse suggested “gentle enforcement” when ticketing people to provide better safety for people. He doesn’t want to see officers running after people to issue tickets.

“The last thing we want is an officer chasing people to enforce (the bylaw and) people running away from you,” he said.

 A permanent fence was erected earlier in July on the north side of the gorge from Mountain Brow Boulevard to the upper parking lot. The south side from the bridge to the top of the falls was also fenced off. A fence was installed from the staircase south to a point along the Bruce Trail where the embankment is too steep for an easy trip into the gorge.

The new fencing will be installed along the Bruce Trail, which runs parallel to Mud Street at a point where people have been entering to reach a side of the gorge. That side is higher than the falls and numerous people stand next to the edge or sit on the small outcrops taking selfies, said Jackson.

“They can still go there to view the falls,” said Jackson. “But at least with the fence there now if they are on the ledge they will not fall.”

Manager of Parks and Cemeteries Kara Bunn said city staff has also placed cut brush to deter individuals from climbing or cutting through the fencing to access the falls.

Bunn told politicians that it was time tougher enforcement was needed.

“I believe we should start to have some enforcement once we put up the signs,” she said.

Ward 4 Coun. Sam Merulla, who endorsed the idea of getting tougher enforcement measures in place, said in some respects it could be counterproductive for those “thrill seekers.”

“There is an element of people that I think because we are telling them not to (go) is actually encouraging them to do it,” said Merulla. “They choose to act irresponsible.”

Two people have died over the last year and there have been numerous rescues performed at Albion Falls as an increasing number of tourists are flocking to the area.

Merulla said, though, that the number of people injured or calling for help remains a “tiny” number compared to the “thousands of people” who view the falls.

“It’s not like it’s 25 per cent of the visitors,” he said.

Jackson said a future goal is to construct a viewing platform or some “safe” structure for the public to view Albion Falls on the south side, near Mud Street. He said that will mean applying to the Hamilton Future Fund for the money, which could reach about $1 million. City staff is already conducting a preliminary design and exploring engineering studies for such a structure, said Jackson.

The councillor did receive about $500,000 from the Hamilton Future Fund a few years ago that went toward constructing a viewing platform north of the parking lot.

“Unfortunately, it’s not close enough to the water to take that (ideal) picture,” he said.

Jackson will also continue to get the city to install “shock” signs to be installed throughout the area. Those signs would identify the number of rope rescues Hamilton fire officials have conducted; characterize the area as dangerous and identify the number of tragedies that have occurred.

 

 

Hamilton to charge people for trespassing at Albion Falls

News Jul 13, 2017 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton will start laying charges against people who are trespassing at Albion Falls.

Politicians at their July 13 public works committee meeting gave the green-light for staff to install No trespassing signs on recently installed black chained link fences and get Hamilton Police and city officials to start laying charges. Typical fines for trespassing can be about $150, but councillors have asked that the fines be increased.

Once the signs are installed, which could be by the end of the month, enforcement on the no trespassing will begin, said east Mountain Coun. Tom Jackson.

Other signs that will be installed will feature ‘Do Not Climb Fencing’, ‘Stay on Marked Trails’, and ‘No Public Access.’

Related Content

In addition, another $25,000 in new fencing from Jackson’s Ward 6 area rating fund will be installed around Albion Falls and Lovers’ Leap over the next week. The fencing will be up starting July 14 and continue until July 19.  Jackson has taken about $75,000 from his ward funding reserve to pay for the new fencing.

“I have been hesitant to do anything concrete up to now,” said Jackson, who represents the ward where Albion Falls is located.  “But we had to do something to stem the tide.”

Director of Licensing Ken Leendertse suggested “gentle enforcement” when ticketing people to provide better safety for people. He doesn’t want to see officers running after people to issue tickets.

“The last thing we want is an officer chasing people to enforce (the bylaw and) people running away from you,” he said.

 A permanent fence was erected earlier in July on the north side of the gorge from Mountain Brow Boulevard to the upper parking lot. The south side from the bridge to the top of the falls was also fenced off. A fence was installed from the staircase south to a point along the Bruce Trail where the embankment is too steep for an easy trip into the gorge.

The new fencing will be installed along the Bruce Trail, which runs parallel to Mud Street at a point where people have been entering to reach a side of the gorge. That side is higher than the falls and numerous people stand next to the edge or sit on the small outcrops taking selfies, said Jackson.

“They can still go there to view the falls,” said Jackson. “But at least with the fence there now if they are on the ledge they will not fall.”

Manager of Parks and Cemeteries Kara Bunn said city staff has also placed cut brush to deter individuals from climbing or cutting through the fencing to access the falls.

Bunn told politicians that it was time tougher enforcement was needed.

“I believe we should start to have some enforcement once we put up the signs,” she said.

Ward 4 Coun. Sam Merulla, who endorsed the idea of getting tougher enforcement measures in place, said in some respects it could be counterproductive for those “thrill seekers.”

“There is an element of people that I think because we are telling them not to (go) is actually encouraging them to do it,” said Merulla. “They choose to act irresponsible.”

Two people have died over the last year and there have been numerous rescues performed at Albion Falls as an increasing number of tourists are flocking to the area.

Merulla said, though, that the number of people injured or calling for help remains a “tiny” number compared to the “thousands of people” who view the falls.

“It’s not like it’s 25 per cent of the visitors,” he said.

Jackson said a future goal is to construct a viewing platform or some “safe” structure for the public to view Albion Falls on the south side, near Mud Street. He said that will mean applying to the Hamilton Future Fund for the money, which could reach about $1 million. City staff is already conducting a preliminary design and exploring engineering studies for such a structure, said Jackson.

The councillor did receive about $500,000 from the Hamilton Future Fund a few years ago that went toward constructing a viewing platform north of the parking lot.

“Unfortunately, it’s not close enough to the water to take that (ideal) picture,” he said.

Jackson will also continue to get the city to install “shock” signs to be installed throughout the area. Those signs would identify the number of rope rescues Hamilton fire officials have conducted; characterize the area as dangerous and identify the number of tragedies that have occurred.

 

 

Hamilton to charge people for trespassing at Albion Falls

News Jul 13, 2017 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton will start laying charges against people who are trespassing at Albion Falls.

Politicians at their July 13 public works committee meeting gave the green-light for staff to install No trespassing signs on recently installed black chained link fences and get Hamilton Police and city officials to start laying charges. Typical fines for trespassing can be about $150, but councillors have asked that the fines be increased.

Once the signs are installed, which could be by the end of the month, enforcement on the no trespassing will begin, said east Mountain Coun. Tom Jackson.

Other signs that will be installed will feature ‘Do Not Climb Fencing’, ‘Stay on Marked Trails’, and ‘No Public Access.’

Related Content

In addition, another $25,000 in new fencing from Jackson’s Ward 6 area rating fund will be installed around Albion Falls and Lovers’ Leap over the next week. The fencing will be up starting July 14 and continue until July 19.  Jackson has taken about $75,000 from his ward funding reserve to pay for the new fencing.

“I have been hesitant to do anything concrete up to now,” said Jackson, who represents the ward where Albion Falls is located.  “But we had to do something to stem the tide.”

Director of Licensing Ken Leendertse suggested “gentle enforcement” when ticketing people to provide better safety for people. He doesn’t want to see officers running after people to issue tickets.

“The last thing we want is an officer chasing people to enforce (the bylaw and) people running away from you,” he said.

 A permanent fence was erected earlier in July on the north side of the gorge from Mountain Brow Boulevard to the upper parking lot. The south side from the bridge to the top of the falls was also fenced off. A fence was installed from the staircase south to a point along the Bruce Trail where the embankment is too steep for an easy trip into the gorge.

The new fencing will be installed along the Bruce Trail, which runs parallel to Mud Street at a point where people have been entering to reach a side of the gorge. That side is higher than the falls and numerous people stand next to the edge or sit on the small outcrops taking selfies, said Jackson.

“They can still go there to view the falls,” said Jackson. “But at least with the fence there now if they are on the ledge they will not fall.”

Manager of Parks and Cemeteries Kara Bunn said city staff has also placed cut brush to deter individuals from climbing or cutting through the fencing to access the falls.

Bunn told politicians that it was time tougher enforcement was needed.

“I believe we should start to have some enforcement once we put up the signs,” she said.

Ward 4 Coun. Sam Merulla, who endorsed the idea of getting tougher enforcement measures in place, said in some respects it could be counterproductive for those “thrill seekers.”

“There is an element of people that I think because we are telling them not to (go) is actually encouraging them to do it,” said Merulla. “They choose to act irresponsible.”

Two people have died over the last year and there have been numerous rescues performed at Albion Falls as an increasing number of tourists are flocking to the area.

Merulla said, though, that the number of people injured or calling for help remains a “tiny” number compared to the “thousands of people” who view the falls.

“It’s not like it’s 25 per cent of the visitors,” he said.

Jackson said a future goal is to construct a viewing platform or some “safe” structure for the public to view Albion Falls on the south side, near Mud Street. He said that will mean applying to the Hamilton Future Fund for the money, which could reach about $1 million. City staff is already conducting a preliminary design and exploring engineering studies for such a structure, said Jackson.

The councillor did receive about $500,000 from the Hamilton Future Fund a few years ago that went toward constructing a viewing platform north of the parking lot.

“Unfortunately, it’s not close enough to the water to take that (ideal) picture,” he said.

Jackson will also continue to get the city to install “shock” signs to be installed throughout the area. Those signs would identify the number of rope rescues Hamilton fire officials have conducted; characterize the area as dangerous and identify the number of tragedies that have occurred.