Don't fence us out: Albion Falls fans

News Jul 09, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Make it safer — but don’t wall it off, says a group of waterfall fans who met last week to come up with ideas for improving Albion Falls.

“We want it accessible,” says Greg Lenko, founder of The Escarpment Project.

“Don’t lock us out.”

A group of 12 people passionate about the city’s waterfalls came together at Lenko’s request and brainstormed for about two-and-a-half hours on July 5.

They came up with more than 30 ideas — many admittedly pie in the sky, but many within the city’s reach as it struggles with balancing access to nature and safety of tourists (see sidebar).

The suggestions are being given to east Mountain Coun. Tom Jackson, who represents the area and has been looking at improvements at Albion.

Over the past year, two people have died and numerous people have had to be rescued from the 19 metre gorge.

Lenko and others in the group say those who know the area access and enjoy Hamilton’s waterfalls safely. But, the growing number of tourists coming to see Albion Falls are not familiar with the area and take risks to get closer to the cascading water.

“And who can get the best selfie,” adds Lenko.

One of the suggestions that came out of the brainstorming session was highlighting safe areas for selfies.

Posting signs denoting the poor water quality — as the Red Hill Creek that feeds Albion Falls passes through an old city dump south of the Lincoln Alexander Parkway — was also suggested as a way to keep people out of the waterfall itself, where slippery rocks can lead to deadly falls.

Lenko started The Escarpment Project (escarpmentproject.ca) six years ago, after becoming dismayed with garbage being dumped down the side of the Niagara Escarpment, particularly near waterfalls.

He says that in 2012, there was a discernible path to get from the Albion staircase to the bottom of the falls; but, through erosion and people wearing in new paths which suddenly end, it makes it hard for first-time visitors to know where to go.

Don't fence us out: Albion Falls fans

Make it safer, but don't wall it off, says group

News Jul 09, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Make it safer — but don’t wall it off, says a group of waterfall fans who met last week to come up with ideas for improving Albion Falls.

“We want it accessible,” says Greg Lenko, founder of The Escarpment Project.

“Don’t lock us out.”

A group of 12 people passionate about the city’s waterfalls came together at Lenko’s request and brainstormed for about two-and-a-half hours on July 5.

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They came up with more than 30 ideas — many admittedly pie in the sky, but many within the city’s reach as it struggles with balancing access to nature and safety of tourists (see sidebar).

The suggestions are being given to east Mountain Coun. Tom Jackson, who represents the area and has been looking at improvements at Albion.

Over the past year, two people have died and numerous people have had to be rescued from the 19 metre gorge.

Lenko and others in the group say those who know the area access and enjoy Hamilton’s waterfalls safely. But, the growing number of tourists coming to see Albion Falls are not familiar with the area and take risks to get closer to the cascading water.

“And who can get the best selfie,” adds Lenko.

One of the suggestions that came out of the brainstorming session was highlighting safe areas for selfies.

Posting signs denoting the poor water quality — as the Red Hill Creek that feeds Albion Falls passes through an old city dump south of the Lincoln Alexander Parkway — was also suggested as a way to keep people out of the waterfall itself, where slippery rocks can lead to deadly falls.

Lenko started The Escarpment Project (escarpmentproject.ca) six years ago, after becoming dismayed with garbage being dumped down the side of the Niagara Escarpment, particularly near waterfalls.

He says that in 2012, there was a discernible path to get from the Albion staircase to the bottom of the falls; but, through erosion and people wearing in new paths which suddenly end, it makes it hard for first-time visitors to know where to go.

Don't fence us out: Albion Falls fans

Make it safer, but don't wall it off, says group

News Jul 09, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Make it safer — but don’t wall it off, says a group of waterfall fans who met last week to come up with ideas for improving Albion Falls.

“We want it accessible,” says Greg Lenko, founder of The Escarpment Project.

“Don’t lock us out.”

A group of 12 people passionate about the city’s waterfalls came together at Lenko’s request and brainstormed for about two-and-a-half hours on July 5.

Related Content

They came up with more than 30 ideas — many admittedly pie in the sky, but many within the city’s reach as it struggles with balancing access to nature and safety of tourists (see sidebar).

The suggestions are being given to east Mountain Coun. Tom Jackson, who represents the area and has been looking at improvements at Albion.

Over the past year, two people have died and numerous people have had to be rescued from the 19 metre gorge.

Lenko and others in the group say those who know the area access and enjoy Hamilton’s waterfalls safely. But, the growing number of tourists coming to see Albion Falls are not familiar with the area and take risks to get closer to the cascading water.

“And who can get the best selfie,” adds Lenko.

One of the suggestions that came out of the brainstorming session was highlighting safe areas for selfies.

Posting signs denoting the poor water quality — as the Red Hill Creek that feeds Albion Falls passes through an old city dump south of the Lincoln Alexander Parkway — was also suggested as a way to keep people out of the waterfall itself, where slippery rocks can lead to deadly falls.

Lenko started The Escarpment Project (escarpmentproject.ca) six years ago, after becoming dismayed with garbage being dumped down the side of the Niagara Escarpment, particularly near waterfalls.

He says that in 2012, there was a discernible path to get from the Albion staircase to the bottom of the falls; but, through erosion and people wearing in new paths which suddenly end, it makes it hard for first-time visitors to know where to go.