Snow fence s’no problem for determined visitors to Albion Falls

News Jul 06, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Within 60 seconds of the Mountain News arriving at Albion Falls last Friday afternoon, four people could be seen climbing over bright orange snow fence and onto the fenced-off staircase to get down into the gorge.

The stairs had been closed off with chainlink fence at the top and bottom two days earlier, part of the city’s effort to keep people out of precarious situations around the popular east Mountain site following two deaths and numerous rescue calls there in the past year. While that fencing was being put in place, numerous people scampered down a path about 20 feet away to get into the gorge.

On Friday, the city put up the temporary plastic fencing in three areas where there was no permanent fence to keep people from trying to get to the base of the falls. By Saturday morning the snow fence, which had been zip-tied to the staircase post, was ripped down and being bypassed by numerous hikers.

The stairs descend about 15 feet from street level. From there, hikers follow various earthen and rocky paths to make their way next to the falls or down to the base.

The city wants people to use two viewing platforms on the north side of the gorge rather than the unmarked trails and paths that lead to the base of the falls on the south side. It also wants to deter people from going down the steep bank near the platforms.

Along with the snow fence, workers also piled up brush in some areas to further deter anyone from venturing down the steep north slope.

In a press release, the city noted “waterfalls and other edges along the escarpment can be dangerous and should be treated as such. Residents and visitors should exercise caution, stick to safe viewing areas, respect the posted signage and check out the falls from the viewing platforms.”

Permanent fencing is expected to be put in place this week.

The city noted it had been cracking down on illegal parking around the city’s waterfall areas as illegally parked cars can impede emergency vehicles and crews trying to access waterfall areas if a rescue is required. Heading into the long weekend, nearly 650 tickets had been issued since mid-April.

Albion Falls has been the site of two accidental deaths and numerous rescue calls to assist injured or stuck hikers over the past two years.


Snow fence s’no problem for determined visitors to Albion Falls

City of Hamilton's plastic barrier pushed aside

News Jul 06, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Within 60 seconds of the Mountain News arriving at Albion Falls last Friday afternoon, four people could be seen climbing over bright orange snow fence and onto the fenced-off staircase to get down into the gorge.

The stairs had been closed off with chainlink fence at the top and bottom two days earlier, part of the city’s effort to keep people out of precarious situations around the popular east Mountain site following two deaths and numerous rescue calls there in the past year. While that fencing was being put in place, numerous people scampered down a path about 20 feet away to get into the gorge.

On Friday, the city put up the temporary plastic fencing in three areas where there was no permanent fence to keep people from trying to get to the base of the falls. By Saturday morning the snow fence, which had been zip-tied to the staircase post, was ripped down and being bypassed by numerous hikers.

The stairs descend about 15 feet from street level. From there, hikers follow various earthen and rocky paths to make their way next to the falls or down to the base.

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The city wants people to use two viewing platforms on the north side of the gorge rather than the unmarked trails and paths that lead to the base of the falls on the south side. It also wants to deter people from going down the steep bank near the platforms.

Along with the snow fence, workers also piled up brush in some areas to further deter anyone from venturing down the steep north slope.

In a press release, the city noted “waterfalls and other edges along the escarpment can be dangerous and should be treated as such. Residents and visitors should exercise caution, stick to safe viewing areas, respect the posted signage and check out the falls from the viewing platforms.”

Permanent fencing is expected to be put in place this week.

The city noted it had been cracking down on illegal parking around the city’s waterfall areas as illegally parked cars can impede emergency vehicles and crews trying to access waterfall areas if a rescue is required. Heading into the long weekend, nearly 650 tickets had been issued since mid-April.

Albion Falls has been the site of two accidental deaths and numerous rescue calls to assist injured or stuck hikers over the past two years.


Snow fence s’no problem for determined visitors to Albion Falls

City of Hamilton's plastic barrier pushed aside

News Jul 06, 2017 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Within 60 seconds of the Mountain News arriving at Albion Falls last Friday afternoon, four people could be seen climbing over bright orange snow fence and onto the fenced-off staircase to get down into the gorge.

The stairs had been closed off with chainlink fence at the top and bottom two days earlier, part of the city’s effort to keep people out of precarious situations around the popular east Mountain site following two deaths and numerous rescue calls there in the past year. While that fencing was being put in place, numerous people scampered down a path about 20 feet away to get into the gorge.

On Friday, the city put up the temporary plastic fencing in three areas where there was no permanent fence to keep people from trying to get to the base of the falls. By Saturday morning the snow fence, which had been zip-tied to the staircase post, was ripped down and being bypassed by numerous hikers.

The stairs descend about 15 feet from street level. From there, hikers follow various earthen and rocky paths to make their way next to the falls or down to the base.

Related Content

The city wants people to use two viewing platforms on the north side of the gorge rather than the unmarked trails and paths that lead to the base of the falls on the south side. It also wants to deter people from going down the steep bank near the platforms.

Along with the snow fence, workers also piled up brush in some areas to further deter anyone from venturing down the steep north slope.

In a press release, the city noted “waterfalls and other edges along the escarpment can be dangerous and should be treated as such. Residents and visitors should exercise caution, stick to safe viewing areas, respect the posted signage and check out the falls from the viewing platforms.”

Permanent fencing is expected to be put in place this week.

The city noted it had been cracking down on illegal parking around the city’s waterfall areas as illegally parked cars can impede emergency vehicles and crews trying to access waterfall areas if a rescue is required. Heading into the long weekend, nearly 650 tickets had been issued since mid-April.

Albion Falls has been the site of two accidental deaths and numerous rescue calls to assist injured or stuck hikers over the past two years.