Ontario announces funding for people with developmental disabilities

News Jun 26, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Ontario government is providing more money for staff and other resources to assist adults with developmental disabilities.

The $12.5 million was announced Helena Jaczek Minister of Community and Social Services  at Contact Hamilton.

“This targeted investment will make vital connections between people with developmental disabilities and the services they need in their communities,” said Jaczek.

The funding had already been announced in the Liberal’s 2017 budget released this spring.

A report by Ontario Ombudsman Paul Dube, released last year, found that people with developmental disabilities too often end up in institutions without the proper resources to meet their needs. It offered up 60 recommendations to overhaul the system to ensure people with developmental disabilities receive the support, care and protection they need.

His investigation, which began in 2012, found an inflexible ministry to respond to sometimes horrifying cases of neglect. The ministry has started to improve how it handles disturbing cases, but the system, Dube stated, remains “fragmented, confusing, and a complex assortment of hundreds of community agencies and local processes, impossible for many individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to navigate.”

The report also found that there are about 14,000 adults with developmental disabilities on a wait list for housing. It stated it would take over 20 years to eliminate the wait list if no other person was added to the list.

The long wait list forced a group of parents of adult children with developmental disabilities to lobby the provincial government for funding to construct a proposed 18-bed Dundas Living Centre. So far, their efforts have been rejected by the provincial government.

The Liberal funding will go toward 10 initiatives including “enhancing service navigation” at developmental service offices; supporting individualized planning and housing solutions; expand family and support resources; provide partnerships with the Ontario disability employment network among developmental services agencies, employment support service providers, school boards and employers.

“This furthers our goal for a more inclusive, person-centred approach to delivering developmental services,” said Jaczek.

Lea Pollard, executive director of the Development Services Office Hamilton Niagara and Contact Hamilton, applauded the funding announcement.

She said the money will help to “ensure that people and their support network have the information that they need and are better connected to services in their communities (that is) meaningful and appropriate to them.”

Although Pollard said she didn’t know how much money her organization was going to receive this budget year from the funding, it will mean three additional staff people to the organization. There are already 20 people employed, she said.

“The funding for service navigation will really help us to connect with families and provide them with the time that they need and information they need to be better connected,” she said.

There are about 70,000 adults in Ontario with developmental disabilities. About 18,000 adults receive residential supports from the province.

$12.5 million to help connect adults with developmental disabilities to resources

News Jun 26, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Ontario government is providing more money for staff and other resources to assist adults with developmental disabilities.

The $12.5 million was announced Helena Jaczek Minister of Community and Social Services  at Contact Hamilton.

“This targeted investment will make vital connections between people with developmental disabilities and the services they need in their communities,” said Jaczek.

The funding had already been announced in the Liberal’s 2017 budget released this spring.

A report by Ontario Ombudsman Paul Dube, released last year, found that people with developmental disabilities too often end up in institutions without the proper resources to meet their needs. It offered up 60 recommendations to overhaul the system to ensure people with developmental disabilities receive the support, care and protection they need.

His investigation, which began in 2012, found an inflexible ministry to respond to sometimes horrifying cases of neglect. The ministry has started to improve how it handles disturbing cases, but the system, Dube stated, remains “fragmented, confusing, and a complex assortment of hundreds of community agencies and local processes, impossible for many individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to navigate.”

The report also found that there are about 14,000 adults with developmental disabilities on a wait list for housing. It stated it would take over 20 years to eliminate the wait list if no other person was added to the list.

The long wait list forced a group of parents of adult children with developmental disabilities to lobby the provincial government for funding to construct a proposed 18-bed Dundas Living Centre. So far, their efforts have been rejected by the provincial government.

The Liberal funding will go toward 10 initiatives including “enhancing service navigation” at developmental service offices; supporting individualized planning and housing solutions; expand family and support resources; provide partnerships with the Ontario disability employment network among developmental services agencies, employment support service providers, school boards and employers.

“This furthers our goal for a more inclusive, person-centred approach to delivering developmental services,” said Jaczek.

Lea Pollard, executive director of the Development Services Office Hamilton Niagara and Contact Hamilton, applauded the funding announcement.

She said the money will help to “ensure that people and their support network have the information that they need and are better connected to services in their communities (that is) meaningful and appropriate to them.”

Although Pollard said she didn’t know how much money her organization was going to receive this budget year from the funding, it will mean three additional staff people to the organization. There are already 20 people employed, she said.

“The funding for service navigation will really help us to connect with families and provide them with the time that they need and information they need to be better connected,” she said.

There are about 70,000 adults in Ontario with developmental disabilities. About 18,000 adults receive residential supports from the province.

$12.5 million to help connect adults with developmental disabilities to resources

News Jun 26, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Ontario government is providing more money for staff and other resources to assist adults with developmental disabilities.

The $12.5 million was announced Helena Jaczek Minister of Community and Social Services  at Contact Hamilton.

“This targeted investment will make vital connections between people with developmental disabilities and the services they need in their communities,” said Jaczek.

The funding had already been announced in the Liberal’s 2017 budget released this spring.

A report by Ontario Ombudsman Paul Dube, released last year, found that people with developmental disabilities too often end up in institutions without the proper resources to meet their needs. It offered up 60 recommendations to overhaul the system to ensure people with developmental disabilities receive the support, care and protection they need.

His investigation, which began in 2012, found an inflexible ministry to respond to sometimes horrifying cases of neglect. The ministry has started to improve how it handles disturbing cases, but the system, Dube stated, remains “fragmented, confusing, and a complex assortment of hundreds of community agencies and local processes, impossible for many individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to navigate.”

The report also found that there are about 14,000 adults with developmental disabilities on a wait list for housing. It stated it would take over 20 years to eliminate the wait list if no other person was added to the list.

The long wait list forced a group of parents of adult children with developmental disabilities to lobby the provincial government for funding to construct a proposed 18-bed Dundas Living Centre. So far, their efforts have been rejected by the provincial government.

The Liberal funding will go toward 10 initiatives including “enhancing service navigation” at developmental service offices; supporting individualized planning and housing solutions; expand family and support resources; provide partnerships with the Ontario disability employment network among developmental services agencies, employment support service providers, school boards and employers.

“This furthers our goal for a more inclusive, person-centred approach to delivering developmental services,” said Jaczek.

Lea Pollard, executive director of the Development Services Office Hamilton Niagara and Contact Hamilton, applauded the funding announcement.

She said the money will help to “ensure that people and their support network have the information that they need and are better connected to services in their communities (that is) meaningful and appropriate to them.”

Although Pollard said she didn’t know how much money her organization was going to receive this budget year from the funding, it will mean three additional staff people to the organization. There are already 20 people employed, she said.

“The funding for service navigation will really help us to connect with families and provide them with the time that they need and information they need to be better connected,” she said.

There are about 70,000 adults in Ontario with developmental disabilities. About 18,000 adults receive residential supports from the province.