Stoney Creek hits $33.5M school cash jackpot

News Jun 19, 2017 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s public school board has scored enough provincial cash to fulfil nearly all of a plan to close six public elementary schools in Stoney Creek and rebuild three of them.

Education Minister Mitzie Hunter dropped by Glen Brae school on Monday to announce another $33.5 million in funding for three projects emanating from last year’s accommodation reviews in lower Stoney Creek and east Hamilton.

The new money will allow the board to rebuild at Memorial and expand Collegiate Avenue in Stoney Creek, and replace Glen Brae and Glen Echo in east Hamilton with a single school with a capacity for 682 students.

It’s on top of last year’s $11.5 million to rebuild Eastdale in Stoney Creek and $1 million to add onto Sir Wilfrid Laurier in east Hamilton.

The board had sought approval to rebuild Collegiate Avenue as part of a plan to shutter Billy Green, R.L. Hyslop and Mountain View, but Stoney Creek Trustee Jeff Beattie said funding for the addition coupled with the new schools is still great news.

The new Memorial will have room for 495 students, while the Collegiate Avenue expansion will add 213 students.

“I call that a hat trick. We got all three schools, essentially,” Beattie said, praising the business cases put forward by staff for allowing the board to secure funding in a little more than a year since trustees approved the two closure plans.

The new school replacing Glen Brae and Glen Echo will also result in the closure of Sir Isaac Brock.

“I think it shows that if you’re prepared to do the hard work, you’ll see results.”

Board chair Todd White said the announcement not only completes the two closure plans, but allows projects from accommodation reviews in Ancaster and downtown Hamilton to move up the wish list for future funding.

He said the board is being rewarded for proactively addressing excess pupil spaces, having already won funding for new high schools at Scott Park and on the south Mountain as well as five elementary rebuilds in recent years.

“When we as a board know where we want to go, in terms of direction, the ministry has been delivering,” White said. “So far we’re batting 100 per cent.”

Hunter said the three new projects will all include three classrooms each with 49 spaces for child care, calling them part of her government’s vision of providing students “with the best school environment in which to learn and to grow.”

She said the funding is from the final year of a special four-year $750-million fund to encourage school consolidations, one the province overspent by $68 million to meet demand.

Hunter didn’t directly respond to a reporter’s questions on whether her government plans to create a new fund for school closures, but said school boards will continue to be able to submit eight projects for consideration during the regular annual capital funding process.

Stoney Creek hits $33.5M school cash jackpot

New Memorial, Collegiate addition to join Eastdale and Brae rebuilds

News Jun 19, 2017 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s public school board has scored enough provincial cash to fulfil nearly all of a plan to close six public elementary schools in Stoney Creek and rebuild three of them.

Education Minister Mitzie Hunter dropped by Glen Brae school on Monday to announce another $33.5 million in funding for three projects emanating from last year’s accommodation reviews in lower Stoney Creek and east Hamilton.

The new money will allow the board to rebuild at Memorial and expand Collegiate Avenue in Stoney Creek, and replace Glen Brae and Glen Echo in east Hamilton with a single school with a capacity for 682 students.

It’s on top of last year’s $11.5 million to rebuild Eastdale in Stoney Creek and $1 million to add onto Sir Wilfrid Laurier in east Hamilton.

When we as a board know where we want to go, in terms of direction, the ministry has been delivering.

The board had sought approval to rebuild Collegiate Avenue as part of a plan to shutter Billy Green, R.L. Hyslop and Mountain View, but Stoney Creek Trustee Jeff Beattie said funding for the addition coupled with the new schools is still great news.

The new Memorial will have room for 495 students, while the Collegiate Avenue expansion will add 213 students.

“I call that a hat trick. We got all three schools, essentially,” Beattie said, praising the business cases put forward by staff for allowing the board to secure funding in a little more than a year since trustees approved the two closure plans.

The new school replacing Glen Brae and Glen Echo will also result in the closure of Sir Isaac Brock.

“I think it shows that if you’re prepared to do the hard work, you’ll see results.”

Board chair Todd White said the announcement not only completes the two closure plans, but allows projects from accommodation reviews in Ancaster and downtown Hamilton to move up the wish list for future funding.

He said the board is being rewarded for proactively addressing excess pupil spaces, having already won funding for new high schools at Scott Park and on the south Mountain as well as five elementary rebuilds in recent years.

“When we as a board know where we want to go, in terms of direction, the ministry has been delivering,” White said. “So far we’re batting 100 per cent.”

Hunter said the three new projects will all include three classrooms each with 49 spaces for child care, calling them part of her government’s vision of providing students “with the best school environment in which to learn and to grow.”

She said the funding is from the final year of a special four-year $750-million fund to encourage school consolidations, one the province overspent by $68 million to meet demand.

Hunter didn’t directly respond to a reporter’s questions on whether her government plans to create a new fund for school closures, but said school boards will continue to be able to submit eight projects for consideration during the regular annual capital funding process.

Stoney Creek hits $33.5M school cash jackpot

New Memorial, Collegiate addition to join Eastdale and Brae rebuilds

News Jun 19, 2017 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s public school board has scored enough provincial cash to fulfil nearly all of a plan to close six public elementary schools in Stoney Creek and rebuild three of them.

Education Minister Mitzie Hunter dropped by Glen Brae school on Monday to announce another $33.5 million in funding for three projects emanating from last year’s accommodation reviews in lower Stoney Creek and east Hamilton.

The new money will allow the board to rebuild at Memorial and expand Collegiate Avenue in Stoney Creek, and replace Glen Brae and Glen Echo in east Hamilton with a single school with a capacity for 682 students.

It’s on top of last year’s $11.5 million to rebuild Eastdale in Stoney Creek and $1 million to add onto Sir Wilfrid Laurier in east Hamilton.

When we as a board know where we want to go, in terms of direction, the ministry has been delivering.

The board had sought approval to rebuild Collegiate Avenue as part of a plan to shutter Billy Green, R.L. Hyslop and Mountain View, but Stoney Creek Trustee Jeff Beattie said funding for the addition coupled with the new schools is still great news.

The new Memorial will have room for 495 students, while the Collegiate Avenue expansion will add 213 students.

“I call that a hat trick. We got all three schools, essentially,” Beattie said, praising the business cases put forward by staff for allowing the board to secure funding in a little more than a year since trustees approved the two closure plans.

The new school replacing Glen Brae and Glen Echo will also result in the closure of Sir Isaac Brock.

“I think it shows that if you’re prepared to do the hard work, you’ll see results.”

Board chair Todd White said the announcement not only completes the two closure plans, but allows projects from accommodation reviews in Ancaster and downtown Hamilton to move up the wish list for future funding.

He said the board is being rewarded for proactively addressing excess pupil spaces, having already won funding for new high schools at Scott Park and on the south Mountain as well as five elementary rebuilds in recent years.

“When we as a board know where we want to go, in terms of direction, the ministry has been delivering,” White said. “So far we’re batting 100 per cent.”

Hunter said the three new projects will all include three classrooms each with 49 spaces for child care, calling them part of her government’s vision of providing students “with the best school environment in which to learn and to grow.”

She said the funding is from the final year of a special four-year $750-million fund to encourage school consolidations, one the province overspent by $68 million to meet demand.

Hunter didn’t directly respond to a reporter’s questions on whether her government plans to create a new fund for school closures, but said school boards will continue to be able to submit eight projects for consideration during the regular annual capital funding process.