Dundas' Ellen Osler Home celebrates 'Windows on Justice' success

News Jun 07, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

The Windows on Justice project at Ellen Osler Home in Dundas has involved more than window replacement and other building upgrades.

After 13 years of quietly providing a 12-bed Salvation Army-managed community residential facility for female offenders released from prison, the windows to the home were also figuratively opened to to the community after 2013. The goal had always been to rehabilitate and prepare former prisoners to transition back into the wider community.

When Marguerite Ward took over as executive director three and a half years ago, she reached out to the local community and improved the home’s involvement with Dundas groups and volunteers.

“In 45 years with the Salvation Army, I’ve always found community is your best friend,” Ward said during a celebration of the home and its improvements.

Reaching out to find community partners, Ward met Anne Washington of St. James Anglican Church and the Association of Dundas Churches, which became early supporters of the Ellen Osler Home effort.

“(Anne) shared my vision,” Ward said.

Washington became chair of the first Osler Home community council, which helped carry out the Windows on Justice project.

The new executive director quickly discovered that people she spoke to had no idea what really went on inside the residential facility at 34 Hatt St.

Last week, visitors to the Ellen Osler Home got to tour the 108-year-old building, meet staff and residents, and learn more.

“Windows on Justice began with two goals — to raise awareness and also to raise funds to support Ellen Osler Home’s window replacement,” an information board inside the home stated.

There were regular meetings, discussions and presentations about women and the justice system. Ward arranged presentations about Ellen Osler Home, and visits, to interested people and groups.

The Salvation Army received $30,000 in grants from Hamilton Community Foundation’s Dougher Fund to pay for the windows, painting and other upgrades to the historic building.

Nikki Smith of Correctional Services Canada said the work has improved service to Ellen Osler residents and the home’s esthetic value within the community

Major Everett Barrow, Salvation Army divisional commander, said rehabilitation and integration of offenders has been a focus of the organization since 1891.

“We do believe that lives can change,” Barrow said.

For Ward, that effort could not be hidden away. The need for new windows that the home could not afford three and a half years ago provided an opportunity to connect with the community, which plays a big role in reintegration of the women who are living there.

“We don’t see ourselves as 'in' the Dundas community,” Ward said. “We see ourselves as 'part' of the Dundas community.”

Osler Home business manager Cassandra Pollard said the women who are living at the home feel welcome in the community and benefit from Dundas’ walkability, which supports the transition effort.

Salvation Army public relations director Dan Miller said when Ward arrived in Dundas at the end of 2013 “everything changed”.

“Marguerite is an amazing leader,” Miller said. “She’s built a really good management team.”

Correctional Services Canada issues a one-year contract to Ellen Osler Home, with annual renewal options, to provide a community residential facility. The current one-year contract expires March 31, 2018.

The federal department provided $746,250.60 in funding to the home in the 2016-17 fiscal year.

Financial struggles for community residential facilities and halfway houses across Canada reportedly forced Ellen Osler House to review possible closure, in 2008. Creative funding approaches had to be found to keep the home operating at that time.

 

Dundas' Ellen Osler Home celebrates 'Windows on Justice' success

Upgrades to historic building helps facility connect with community

News Jun 07, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

The Windows on Justice project at Ellen Osler Home in Dundas has involved more than window replacement and other building upgrades.

After 13 years of quietly providing a 12-bed Salvation Army-managed community residential facility for female offenders released from prison, the windows to the home were also figuratively opened to to the community after 2013. The goal had always been to rehabilitate and prepare former prisoners to transition back into the wider community.

When Marguerite Ward took over as executive director three and a half years ago, she reached out to the local community and improved the home’s involvement with Dundas groups and volunteers.

“In 45 years with the Salvation Army, I’ve always found community is your best friend,” Ward said during a celebration of the home and its improvements.

Reaching out to find community partners, Ward met Anne Washington of St. James Anglican Church and the Association of Dundas Churches, which became early supporters of the Ellen Osler Home effort.

“(Anne) shared my vision,” Ward said.

Washington became chair of the first Osler Home community council, which helped carry out the Windows on Justice project.

The new executive director quickly discovered that people she spoke to had no idea what really went on inside the residential facility at 34 Hatt St.

Last week, visitors to the Ellen Osler Home got to tour the 108-year-old building, meet staff and residents, and learn more.

“Windows on Justice began with two goals — to raise awareness and also to raise funds to support Ellen Osler Home’s window replacement,” an information board inside the home stated.

There were regular meetings, discussions and presentations about women and the justice system. Ward arranged presentations about Ellen Osler Home, and visits, to interested people and groups.

The Salvation Army received $30,000 in grants from Hamilton Community Foundation’s Dougher Fund to pay for the windows, painting and other upgrades to the historic building.

Nikki Smith of Correctional Services Canada said the work has improved service to Ellen Osler residents and the home’s esthetic value within the community

Major Everett Barrow, Salvation Army divisional commander, said rehabilitation and integration of offenders has been a focus of the organization since 1891.

“We do believe that lives can change,” Barrow said.

For Ward, that effort could not be hidden away. The need for new windows that the home could not afford three and a half years ago provided an opportunity to connect with the community, which plays a big role in reintegration of the women who are living there.

“We don’t see ourselves as 'in' the Dundas community,” Ward said. “We see ourselves as 'part' of the Dundas community.”

Osler Home business manager Cassandra Pollard said the women who are living at the home feel welcome in the community and benefit from Dundas’ walkability, which supports the transition effort.

Salvation Army public relations director Dan Miller said when Ward arrived in Dundas at the end of 2013 “everything changed”.

“Marguerite is an amazing leader,” Miller said. “She’s built a really good management team.”

Correctional Services Canada issues a one-year contract to Ellen Osler Home, with annual renewal options, to provide a community residential facility. The current one-year contract expires March 31, 2018.

The federal department provided $746,250.60 in funding to the home in the 2016-17 fiscal year.

Financial struggles for community residential facilities and halfway houses across Canada reportedly forced Ellen Osler House to review possible closure, in 2008. Creative funding approaches had to be found to keep the home operating at that time.

 

Dundas' Ellen Osler Home celebrates 'Windows on Justice' success

Upgrades to historic building helps facility connect with community

News Jun 07, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

The Windows on Justice project at Ellen Osler Home in Dundas has involved more than window replacement and other building upgrades.

After 13 years of quietly providing a 12-bed Salvation Army-managed community residential facility for female offenders released from prison, the windows to the home were also figuratively opened to to the community after 2013. The goal had always been to rehabilitate and prepare former prisoners to transition back into the wider community.

When Marguerite Ward took over as executive director three and a half years ago, she reached out to the local community and improved the home’s involvement with Dundas groups and volunteers.

“In 45 years with the Salvation Army, I’ve always found community is your best friend,” Ward said during a celebration of the home and its improvements.

Reaching out to find community partners, Ward met Anne Washington of St. James Anglican Church and the Association of Dundas Churches, which became early supporters of the Ellen Osler Home effort.

“(Anne) shared my vision,” Ward said.

Washington became chair of the first Osler Home community council, which helped carry out the Windows on Justice project.

The new executive director quickly discovered that people she spoke to had no idea what really went on inside the residential facility at 34 Hatt St.

Last week, visitors to the Ellen Osler Home got to tour the 108-year-old building, meet staff and residents, and learn more.

“Windows on Justice began with two goals — to raise awareness and also to raise funds to support Ellen Osler Home’s window replacement,” an information board inside the home stated.

There were regular meetings, discussions and presentations about women and the justice system. Ward arranged presentations about Ellen Osler Home, and visits, to interested people and groups.

The Salvation Army received $30,000 in grants from Hamilton Community Foundation’s Dougher Fund to pay for the windows, painting and other upgrades to the historic building.

Nikki Smith of Correctional Services Canada said the work has improved service to Ellen Osler residents and the home’s esthetic value within the community

Major Everett Barrow, Salvation Army divisional commander, said rehabilitation and integration of offenders has been a focus of the organization since 1891.

“We do believe that lives can change,” Barrow said.

For Ward, that effort could not be hidden away. The need for new windows that the home could not afford three and a half years ago provided an opportunity to connect with the community, which plays a big role in reintegration of the women who are living there.

“We don’t see ourselves as 'in' the Dundas community,” Ward said. “We see ourselves as 'part' of the Dundas community.”

Osler Home business manager Cassandra Pollard said the women who are living at the home feel welcome in the community and benefit from Dundas’ walkability, which supports the transition effort.

Salvation Army public relations director Dan Miller said when Ward arrived in Dundas at the end of 2013 “everything changed”.

“Marguerite is an amazing leader,” Miller said. “She’s built a really good management team.”

Correctional Services Canada issues a one-year contract to Ellen Osler Home, with annual renewal options, to provide a community residential facility. The current one-year contract expires March 31, 2018.

The federal department provided $746,250.60 in funding to the home in the 2016-17 fiscal year.

Financial struggles for community residential facilities and halfway houses across Canada reportedly forced Ellen Osler House to review possible closure, in 2008. Creative funding approaches had to be found to keep the home operating at that time.