Hamilton politicians agree to issue civic rings to former colleagues

News May 30, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Should former Hamilton councillors Brad Clark and Scott Duvall be recognized for their political service to the community?

Mountain councillor Tom Jackson said he “felt bad” those former politicians didn’t receive some acknowledgment for their years of sacrifice from the city and council.

It was one of the reasons why Jackson supported a city staff recommendation to update a policy to give departing, retiring or deceased councillors a civic ring.

Rose Caterina, city clerk, said the policy wasn’t updated for council’s 2010-to-2014 term, which meant Clark, who didn’t run for re-election in Ward 9 in 2014 but instead ran for mayor and lost to Mayor Fred Eisenberger, didn't receive a ring.

Duvall, who was re-elected in Ward 7 but resigned after becoming the Hamilton Mountain NDP MP, also didn’t receive a ring.

Former Dundas councillor Russ Powers didn’t run again in 2014. But he received a ring when he resigned from council in 2004 and was elected Liberal MP for Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale. He was re-elected in 2006 as Dundas councillor.

Other councillors who lost an election, retired or passed away prior to the 2010 council term were provided a civic ring, said Caterina.  

Stoney Creek's  Coun. Maria Pearson said she received a civic ring from the former City of Stoney Creek when she was a councillor. Since being elected to the amalgamated City of Hamilton in 2003, she doesn’t wear the ring.

“In the Stoney Creek days we received our rings when we were elected,” she said. “I wore my ring with pride during my term on council.”

Jackson defended the city providing civic rings to former councillors, saying it is some form of recognition of their hard work on behalf of the community.

“This is nothing ostentatious at all,” said Jackson, who spoke on behalf of issuing civic rings during the May 30 governance review subcommittee. “This is just a small way of saying thanks for the many years of service.”

The subcommittee approved the recommendation to provide civic rings to outgoing, retiring and deceased councillors. About $5,000 per term would be allocated to purchase the rings. Councillors Maria Pearson and Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson both supported the idea.

Ward 3 councillor Matthew Green opposed it. He said after politicians approved what was described as an “austerity” budget this year, and long-term city employees were let go, providing former councillors a ring sends the wrong message to the public.

“I’m challenged to support this given what it symbolizes,” said Green. “I know it will not be a popular position for me to take for past council members.”

He suggested if former councillors want a ring, they should buy one, similar to purchasing a graduation ring or after winning a sports championship.

“Make it available to purchase,” said Green.

The subcommittee’s recommendation will now be sent to Hamilton’s council for discussion.

Hamilton councillors offer civic rings to former colleagues

Recognition of their hard work on behalf of the community

News May 30, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Should former Hamilton councillors Brad Clark and Scott Duvall be recognized for their political service to the community?

Mountain councillor Tom Jackson said he “felt bad” those former politicians didn’t receive some acknowledgment for their years of sacrifice from the city and council.

It was one of the reasons why Jackson supported a city staff recommendation to update a policy to give departing, retiring or deceased councillors a civic ring.

Rose Caterina, city clerk, said the policy wasn’t updated for council’s 2010-to-2014 term, which meant Clark, who didn’t run for re-election in Ward 9 in 2014 but instead ran for mayor and lost to Mayor Fred Eisenberger, didn't receive a ring.

Duvall, who was re-elected in Ward 7 but resigned after becoming the Hamilton Mountain NDP MP, also didn’t receive a ring.

Former Dundas councillor Russ Powers didn’t run again in 2014. But he received a ring when he resigned from council in 2004 and was elected Liberal MP for Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale. He was re-elected in 2006 as Dundas councillor.

Other councillors who lost an election, retired or passed away prior to the 2010 council term were provided a civic ring, said Caterina.  

Stoney Creek's  Coun. Maria Pearson said she received a civic ring from the former City of Stoney Creek when she was a councillor. Since being elected to the amalgamated City of Hamilton in 2003, she doesn’t wear the ring.

“In the Stoney Creek days we received our rings when we were elected,” she said. “I wore my ring with pride during my term on council.”

Jackson defended the city providing civic rings to former councillors, saying it is some form of recognition of their hard work on behalf of the community.

“This is nothing ostentatious at all,” said Jackson, who spoke on behalf of issuing civic rings during the May 30 governance review subcommittee. “This is just a small way of saying thanks for the many years of service.”

The subcommittee approved the recommendation to provide civic rings to outgoing, retiring and deceased councillors. About $5,000 per term would be allocated to purchase the rings. Councillors Maria Pearson and Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson both supported the idea.

Ward 3 councillor Matthew Green opposed it. He said after politicians approved what was described as an “austerity” budget this year, and long-term city employees were let go, providing former councillors a ring sends the wrong message to the public.

“I’m challenged to support this given what it symbolizes,” said Green. “I know it will not be a popular position for me to take for past council members.”

He suggested if former councillors want a ring, they should buy one, similar to purchasing a graduation ring or after winning a sports championship.

“Make it available to purchase,” said Green.

The subcommittee’s recommendation will now be sent to Hamilton’s council for discussion.

Hamilton councillors offer civic rings to former colleagues

Recognition of their hard work on behalf of the community

News May 30, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Should former Hamilton councillors Brad Clark and Scott Duvall be recognized for their political service to the community?

Mountain councillor Tom Jackson said he “felt bad” those former politicians didn’t receive some acknowledgment for their years of sacrifice from the city and council.

It was one of the reasons why Jackson supported a city staff recommendation to update a policy to give departing, retiring or deceased councillors a civic ring.

Rose Caterina, city clerk, said the policy wasn’t updated for council’s 2010-to-2014 term, which meant Clark, who didn’t run for re-election in Ward 9 in 2014 but instead ran for mayor and lost to Mayor Fred Eisenberger, didn't receive a ring.

Duvall, who was re-elected in Ward 7 but resigned after becoming the Hamilton Mountain NDP MP, also didn’t receive a ring.

Former Dundas councillor Russ Powers didn’t run again in 2014. But he received a ring when he resigned from council in 2004 and was elected Liberal MP for Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale. He was re-elected in 2006 as Dundas councillor.

Other councillors who lost an election, retired or passed away prior to the 2010 council term were provided a civic ring, said Caterina.  

Stoney Creek's  Coun. Maria Pearson said she received a civic ring from the former City of Stoney Creek when she was a councillor. Since being elected to the amalgamated City of Hamilton in 2003, she doesn’t wear the ring.

“In the Stoney Creek days we received our rings when we were elected,” she said. “I wore my ring with pride during my term on council.”

Jackson defended the city providing civic rings to former councillors, saying it is some form of recognition of their hard work on behalf of the community.

“This is nothing ostentatious at all,” said Jackson, who spoke on behalf of issuing civic rings during the May 30 governance review subcommittee. “This is just a small way of saying thanks for the many years of service.”

The subcommittee approved the recommendation to provide civic rings to outgoing, retiring and deceased councillors. About $5,000 per term would be allocated to purchase the rings. Councillors Maria Pearson and Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson both supported the idea.

Ward 3 councillor Matthew Green opposed it. He said after politicians approved what was described as an “austerity” budget this year, and long-term city employees were let go, providing former councillors a ring sends the wrong message to the public.

“I’m challenged to support this given what it symbolizes,” said Green. “I know it will not be a popular position for me to take for past council members.”

He suggested if former councillors want a ring, they should buy one, similar to purchasing a graduation ring or after winning a sports championship.

“Make it available to purchase,” said Green.

The subcommittee’s recommendation will now be sent to Hamilton’s council for discussion.