Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger, Liberal MP Bob Bratina’s relationship remains “professional” on behalf of city

News May 19, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Call the relationship between Mayor Fred Eisenberger and Hamilton East-Stoney Creek Liberal MP Bob Bratina what you will, professional, cordial, even “frenemies,” but both say they will work together regardless of how their personal attitudes are toward one another to help benefit the city.

During a federal Canada 150 funding announcement held at Auchmar Estate May 19, a week after Eisenberger blasted Bratina for criticizing the light-rail transit project as a “high stakes gamble” and his lack of effort directing infrastructure dollars to the city, the mayor highlighted the municipality’s need to work with other levels of government, while Bratina pointed out the federal infrastructure money that has and will be flowing to the city.

“We will work together,” Eisenberger told reporters after the announcement. “Any disagreements we have are disagreements that we will have. We will overcome them. I’m professional enough to keep working on behalf of the city. That is my job. His job is to do the same. We will deliver.”

Bratina, speaking to reporters separately, said the Liberal government’s record “speaks for itself” in providing funding to Hamilton projects.

“We are going to keep on going. We are all in this for the greater good for the city. We’ve held announcements previously. Some excellent ones. Today’s announcement is really great under the Canada 150 fund. I can assure you there are many more announcements based on infrastructure needs of the city.”

When asked if he still had a relationship with Eisenberger, Bratina, after a long pause, said he has a “professional” relationship with Hamilton staff, City Manager Chris Murray, and “with everyone.”

“Personal issues may arise from time to time,” the former mayor said. “They really shouldn’t and, in my case, don’t affect the performance of MPs, mayors, MPPs.”

Prior to the May 10 council meeting, Eisenberger issued a media release criticizing Bratina for being “uncharacteristically silent” on such issues as the Stelco pensioners and fighting for more infrastructure money for the city.

Eisenberger said Bratina had seemed to have “grown tired” of federal issues. He said the MP should “re-awaken his interest by assisting the city with federal investments in our infrastructure.”

The mayor’s broadside against his political competitor – Bratina won the mayor’s election in 2010  over Eisenberger – was prompted by a May 10 opinion piece in the Hamilton Spectator where the MP wrote the LRT was a “highly speculative and costly transit gamble” that will do damage to the current economic renaissance the city was experiencing.

In a column in the Stoney Creek News May 18 edition, Bratina promoted his accomplishments since his 2015 election, including directing needed transit funding to the city, helping Stelco pensioners, seniors’ funding and promoting middle class tax cuts for the community.

Bratina said Hamilton has benefited from recent federal funding announcements, including $36 million in transit funding, and eventually the city will see the fruits of the $1.9 billion fund recently announced by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. It contains $196 million of new rail infrastructure that is aimed bring all-day GO transit to Hamilton’s West Harbour and Confederation GO stations.

Bratina also pointed out there could be some federal money to make repairs along Hamilton’s’ shoreline due to the severe flooding. Eisenberger said Friday he was unaware of that funding pot, but will investigate it immediately.

Eisenberger said the $36 million in transit funding, out of the city’s submission of $300 million to establish its BLAST transit network is a “good start.” There still remains the $210 million in transit funding the city has applied to the federal government, he said.

In addition, the city is waiting on announcements from the federal government for water and sewer funding and there are also affordable housing funding needs that city officials have made to federal officials. The mayor made the point he still wanted to see the federal government introduce a national housing program, a promise the Liberals made during their last election victory.

“We are grateful for the funding for the transit system,” Eisenberger  told reporters. “That will be a very positive investment for the benefit of the bus transit network. Our partnership with other levels of government is critically important.”

Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger, Liberal MP Bob Bratina’s relationship remains “professional” on behalf of city

News May 19, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Call the relationship between Mayor Fred Eisenberger and Hamilton East-Stoney Creek Liberal MP Bob Bratina what you will, professional, cordial, even “frenemies,” but both say they will work together regardless of how their personal attitudes are toward one another to help benefit the city.

During a federal Canada 150 funding announcement held at Auchmar Estate May 19, a week after Eisenberger blasted Bratina for criticizing the light-rail transit project as a “high stakes gamble” and his lack of effort directing infrastructure dollars to the city, the mayor highlighted the municipality’s need to work with other levels of government, while Bratina pointed out the federal infrastructure money that has and will be flowing to the city.

“We will work together,” Eisenberger told reporters after the announcement. “Any disagreements we have are disagreements that we will have. We will overcome them. I’m professional enough to keep working on behalf of the city. That is my job. His job is to do the same. We will deliver.”

Bratina, speaking to reporters separately, said the Liberal government’s record “speaks for itself” in providing funding to Hamilton projects.

“We are going to keep on going. We are all in this for the greater good for the city. We’ve held announcements previously. Some excellent ones. Today’s announcement is really great under the Canada 150 fund. I can assure you there are many more announcements based on infrastructure needs of the city.”

When asked if he still had a relationship with Eisenberger, Bratina, after a long pause, said he has a “professional” relationship with Hamilton staff, City Manager Chris Murray, and “with everyone.”

“Personal issues may arise from time to time,” the former mayor said. “They really shouldn’t and, in my case, don’t affect the performance of MPs, mayors, MPPs.”

Prior to the May 10 council meeting, Eisenberger issued a media release criticizing Bratina for being “uncharacteristically silent” on such issues as the Stelco pensioners and fighting for more infrastructure money for the city.

Eisenberger said Bratina had seemed to have “grown tired” of federal issues. He said the MP should “re-awaken his interest by assisting the city with federal investments in our infrastructure.”

The mayor’s broadside against his political competitor – Bratina won the mayor’s election in 2010  over Eisenberger – was prompted by a May 10 opinion piece in the Hamilton Spectator where the MP wrote the LRT was a “highly speculative and costly transit gamble” that will do damage to the current economic renaissance the city was experiencing.

In a column in the Stoney Creek News May 18 edition, Bratina promoted his accomplishments since his 2015 election, including directing needed transit funding to the city, helping Stelco pensioners, seniors’ funding and promoting middle class tax cuts for the community.

Bratina said Hamilton has benefited from recent federal funding announcements, including $36 million in transit funding, and eventually the city will see the fruits of the $1.9 billion fund recently announced by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. It contains $196 million of new rail infrastructure that is aimed bring all-day GO transit to Hamilton’s West Harbour and Confederation GO stations.

Bratina also pointed out there could be some federal money to make repairs along Hamilton’s’ shoreline due to the severe flooding. Eisenberger said Friday he was unaware of that funding pot, but will investigate it immediately.

Eisenberger said the $36 million in transit funding, out of the city’s submission of $300 million to establish its BLAST transit network is a “good start.” There still remains the $210 million in transit funding the city has applied to the federal government, he said.

In addition, the city is waiting on announcements from the federal government for water and sewer funding and there are also affordable housing funding needs that city officials have made to federal officials. The mayor made the point he still wanted to see the federal government introduce a national housing program, a promise the Liberals made during their last election victory.

“We are grateful for the funding for the transit system,” Eisenberger  told reporters. “That will be a very positive investment for the benefit of the bus transit network. Our partnership with other levels of government is critically important.”

Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger, Liberal MP Bob Bratina’s relationship remains “professional” on behalf of city

News May 19, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Call the relationship between Mayor Fred Eisenberger and Hamilton East-Stoney Creek Liberal MP Bob Bratina what you will, professional, cordial, even “frenemies,” but both say they will work together regardless of how their personal attitudes are toward one another to help benefit the city.

During a federal Canada 150 funding announcement held at Auchmar Estate May 19, a week after Eisenberger blasted Bratina for criticizing the light-rail transit project as a “high stakes gamble” and his lack of effort directing infrastructure dollars to the city, the mayor highlighted the municipality’s need to work with other levels of government, while Bratina pointed out the federal infrastructure money that has and will be flowing to the city.

“We will work together,” Eisenberger told reporters after the announcement. “Any disagreements we have are disagreements that we will have. We will overcome them. I’m professional enough to keep working on behalf of the city. That is my job. His job is to do the same. We will deliver.”

Bratina, speaking to reporters separately, said the Liberal government’s record “speaks for itself” in providing funding to Hamilton projects.

“We are going to keep on going. We are all in this for the greater good for the city. We’ve held announcements previously. Some excellent ones. Today’s announcement is really great under the Canada 150 fund. I can assure you there are many more announcements based on infrastructure needs of the city.”

When asked if he still had a relationship with Eisenberger, Bratina, after a long pause, said he has a “professional” relationship with Hamilton staff, City Manager Chris Murray, and “with everyone.”

“Personal issues may arise from time to time,” the former mayor said. “They really shouldn’t and, in my case, don’t affect the performance of MPs, mayors, MPPs.”

Prior to the May 10 council meeting, Eisenberger issued a media release criticizing Bratina for being “uncharacteristically silent” on such issues as the Stelco pensioners and fighting for more infrastructure money for the city.

Eisenberger said Bratina had seemed to have “grown tired” of federal issues. He said the MP should “re-awaken his interest by assisting the city with federal investments in our infrastructure.”

The mayor’s broadside against his political competitor – Bratina won the mayor’s election in 2010  over Eisenberger – was prompted by a May 10 opinion piece in the Hamilton Spectator where the MP wrote the LRT was a “highly speculative and costly transit gamble” that will do damage to the current economic renaissance the city was experiencing.

In a column in the Stoney Creek News May 18 edition, Bratina promoted his accomplishments since his 2015 election, including directing needed transit funding to the city, helping Stelco pensioners, seniors’ funding and promoting middle class tax cuts for the community.

Bratina said Hamilton has benefited from recent federal funding announcements, including $36 million in transit funding, and eventually the city will see the fruits of the $1.9 billion fund recently announced by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. It contains $196 million of new rail infrastructure that is aimed bring all-day GO transit to Hamilton’s West Harbour and Confederation GO stations.

Bratina also pointed out there could be some federal money to make repairs along Hamilton’s’ shoreline due to the severe flooding. Eisenberger said Friday he was unaware of that funding pot, but will investigate it immediately.

Eisenberger said the $36 million in transit funding, out of the city’s submission of $300 million to establish its BLAST transit network is a “good start.” There still remains the $210 million in transit funding the city has applied to the federal government, he said.

In addition, the city is waiting on announcements from the federal government for water and sewer funding and there are also affordable housing funding needs that city officials have made to federal officials. The mayor made the point he still wanted to see the federal government introduce a national housing program, a promise the Liberals made during their last election victory.

“We are grateful for the funding for the transit system,” Eisenberger  told reporters. “That will be a very positive investment for the benefit of the bus transit network. Our partnership with other levels of government is critically important.”