Hamilton officials applaud federal government’s $2 million Canada 150 funding

News May 19, 2017 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton Liberal MPs Bob Bratina and Filomena Tassi re-announced that the city will receive more than $2 million for 12 infrastructure projects as part of the federal Liberals’ Canada 150 program.

“While some of these sums may seem modest, each will have a serious impact on the quality of life of the residents of our ambitious city,” said Tassi, in a news conference May 19 in the historical Auchmar Estate.

The federal government had already announced the Canada 150 funding to municipalities in January. Hamilton officials have already been rushing to meet the program’s March 2018 deadline to complete the projects and qualify for the money.

The Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program is providing $300 million over two years for the renovation, expansion and improvement of existing community and cultural infrastructure. Tassi said that in Southern Ontario there are more than 350 projects that are receiving federal funding under the program.

“(The program) aims to leave a lasting legacy for Canadians as part of the celebrations of Canada 150,” said Tassi.

The funding for a project could not exceed 50 per cent of the project’s cost. Municipalities were required to pay for 33 per cent of any approved projects with the exception of one project, the $145,000 for playground equipment for Perth Park in Ancaster. The federal government is providing $72,500 for the project.

Other projects selected from Hamilton’s list of 24 submitted include $400,000 of $1.2 million for new windows at Hamilton’s central library; $110,000 of the $330,000 cost to rehabilitate the Hamilton Mountain Area elevator; $58,616 of the $174,500 cost to renovate the interior of Ancaster’s Old Town Hall; $170,000 of the $511,000 cost for new gateway features at Confederation Beach Park.

Also on the list is $151,970 of the $455,000 restoration cost for the 1870s roof on the Coach House at Dundurn National Historic site; $233,335 of the $700,000 cost to replace the Alexander Park Wading Pool; $60,750 for accessibility improvements at the Native Women’s Centre that will cost $121,500; and $200,000 out of the $600,000 cost for accessibility needs at the Glanbrook Arena.

The federal government is contributing $166,667 toward the total cost of $500,000 to improve the washrooms at Turner Park.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger, who attended the announcement, praised the federal government’s financial assistance to improve the city’s aging infrastructure.

“I know a lot of old-timer baseball players who will be very grateful to see the facilities improved at Turner Park,” he said. “We are looking to improve what we have before we start building too many new facilities.”

Auchmar also received some needed financing, $273,000 to help rehabilitate the garden walls around the Coach House, which are expected to cost about $817,000.  

City officials are confident all the projects will be “substantially completed” by the March 2018 deadline to qualify for the funding. That means the facility or project is ready for public use.”

Eisenberger said the projects that were not selected for federal funding will have to be paid for by local taxpayers. The projects are already in the city’s future capital plan.

Hamilton officials applaud federal government’s $2 million Canada 150 funding

News May 19, 2017 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton Liberal MPs Bob Bratina and Filomena Tassi re-announced that the city will receive more than $2 million for 12 infrastructure projects as part of the federal Liberals’ Canada 150 program.

“While some of these sums may seem modest, each will have a serious impact on the quality of life of the residents of our ambitious city,” said Tassi, in a news conference May 19 in the historical Auchmar Estate.

The federal government had already announced the Canada 150 funding to municipalities in January. Hamilton officials have already been rushing to meet the program’s March 2018 deadline to complete the projects and qualify for the money.

The Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program is providing $300 million over two years for the renovation, expansion and improvement of existing community and cultural infrastructure. Tassi said that in Southern Ontario there are more than 350 projects that are receiving federal funding under the program.

“(The program) aims to leave a lasting legacy for Canadians as part of the celebrations of Canada 150,” said Tassi.

The funding for a project could not exceed 50 per cent of the project’s cost. Municipalities were required to pay for 33 per cent of any approved projects with the exception of one project, the $145,000 for playground equipment for Perth Park in Ancaster. The federal government is providing $72,500 for the project.

Other projects selected from Hamilton’s list of 24 submitted include $400,000 of $1.2 million for new windows at Hamilton’s central library; $110,000 of the $330,000 cost to rehabilitate the Hamilton Mountain Area elevator; $58,616 of the $174,500 cost to renovate the interior of Ancaster’s Old Town Hall; $170,000 of the $511,000 cost for new gateway features at Confederation Beach Park.

Also on the list is $151,970 of the $455,000 restoration cost for the 1870s roof on the Coach House at Dundurn National Historic site; $233,335 of the $700,000 cost to replace the Alexander Park Wading Pool; $60,750 for accessibility improvements at the Native Women’s Centre that will cost $121,500; and $200,000 out of the $600,000 cost for accessibility needs at the Glanbrook Arena.

The federal government is contributing $166,667 toward the total cost of $500,000 to improve the washrooms at Turner Park.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger, who attended the announcement, praised the federal government’s financial assistance to improve the city’s aging infrastructure.

“I know a lot of old-timer baseball players who will be very grateful to see the facilities improved at Turner Park,” he said. “We are looking to improve what we have before we start building too many new facilities.”

Auchmar also received some needed financing, $273,000 to help rehabilitate the garden walls around the Coach House, which are expected to cost about $817,000.  

City officials are confident all the projects will be “substantially completed” by the March 2018 deadline to qualify for the funding. That means the facility or project is ready for public use.”

Eisenberger said the projects that were not selected for federal funding will have to be paid for by local taxpayers. The projects are already in the city’s future capital plan.

Hamilton officials applaud federal government’s $2 million Canada 150 funding

News May 19, 2017 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton Liberal MPs Bob Bratina and Filomena Tassi re-announced that the city will receive more than $2 million for 12 infrastructure projects as part of the federal Liberals’ Canada 150 program.

“While some of these sums may seem modest, each will have a serious impact on the quality of life of the residents of our ambitious city,” said Tassi, in a news conference May 19 in the historical Auchmar Estate.

The federal government had already announced the Canada 150 funding to municipalities in January. Hamilton officials have already been rushing to meet the program’s March 2018 deadline to complete the projects and qualify for the money.

The Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program is providing $300 million over two years for the renovation, expansion and improvement of existing community and cultural infrastructure. Tassi said that in Southern Ontario there are more than 350 projects that are receiving federal funding under the program.

“(The program) aims to leave a lasting legacy for Canadians as part of the celebrations of Canada 150,” said Tassi.

The funding for a project could not exceed 50 per cent of the project’s cost. Municipalities were required to pay for 33 per cent of any approved projects with the exception of one project, the $145,000 for playground equipment for Perth Park in Ancaster. The federal government is providing $72,500 for the project.

Other projects selected from Hamilton’s list of 24 submitted include $400,000 of $1.2 million for new windows at Hamilton’s central library; $110,000 of the $330,000 cost to rehabilitate the Hamilton Mountain Area elevator; $58,616 of the $174,500 cost to renovate the interior of Ancaster’s Old Town Hall; $170,000 of the $511,000 cost for new gateway features at Confederation Beach Park.

Also on the list is $151,970 of the $455,000 restoration cost for the 1870s roof on the Coach House at Dundurn National Historic site; $233,335 of the $700,000 cost to replace the Alexander Park Wading Pool; $60,750 for accessibility improvements at the Native Women’s Centre that will cost $121,500; and $200,000 out of the $600,000 cost for accessibility needs at the Glanbrook Arena.

The federal government is contributing $166,667 toward the total cost of $500,000 to improve the washrooms at Turner Park.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger, who attended the announcement, praised the federal government’s financial assistance to improve the city’s aging infrastructure.

“I know a lot of old-timer baseball players who will be very grateful to see the facilities improved at Turner Park,” he said. “We are looking to improve what we have before we start building too many new facilities.”

Auchmar also received some needed financing, $273,000 to help rehabilitate the garden walls around the Coach House, which are expected to cost about $817,000.  

City officials are confident all the projects will be “substantially completed” by the March 2018 deadline to qualify for the funding. That means the facility or project is ready for public use.”

Eisenberger said the projects that were not selected for federal funding will have to be paid for by local taxpayers. The projects are already in the city’s future capital plan.