Dundas flooding may have been exacerbated by slower-than-normal response to clear debris

News Apr 21, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Thursday night's overflow of Sydenham Creek due to heavy rain was not a surprise, but a possibly slower-than-normal response to clear debris from the channel at York Road and Cootes Drive may have resulted in more significant flooding.

Russ Woodward, owner of CroDon Kitchen and Bath at 69 King St. E. steps away from the Sydenham Creek channel and epicentre of the flooding said Friday there have been similar incidents at least three times in the past 15 years, but for the first time last night he saw significant impacts with seven feet of water in the store's basement.

Woodward said he had to get all electricity to the building cut off, because the breaker panel was submerged under water.

He believes the delayed response to the York and Cootes channel site to remove debris blocking the flow of water was a major factor in the severity of the flooding. He said previous responses included workers that knew the area well, and were aware of past flooding and where to go, but that some of those workers may have moved to different areas. 

"There was ample time for (debris) to be cleared out of there," Woodward said. "It's happened before."

He said the water knocked over a fence between his property and the Tim Hortons next door, then burst through a basement window into the CroDon building. Although he's seen similar overflowing of the creek banks in heavy rain, he's never seen a result like this in his family-run business' 40-year history.

"The basement filled up like a fishbowl," he said.

A contractor at the Sydenham Creek channel between York Road and Cootes Drive who would not give his name said on Friday afternoon that crews arrived at the site between 8 and 9 p.m. and immediately began removing debris.

The official first reports of flooding in Dundas from Hamilton fire service were shortly after 7:30 p.m.

Jonathon Bastien of the Hamilton Conservation Authority said Dundas received 75 millimetres of rain on Thursday night. He said the watercourse related flooding experienced in Dundas was the result of significant flows in Sydenham Creek overtopping its banks as a result of debris obstructions at culverts.

The authority had issued a flood watch at 4:15 p.m. on Thursday. Rain had already been falling for much of the day, with 20 to 25 millimetres estimated to have fallen by 4:15 p.m.

Dan McKinnon, the City of Hamilton's general manager of public works, said the nearby Dundas Wastewater Treatment Plant yard was under about 45 centimetres of water, but operations of the plant were not affected. However, the heavier-than-normal flows had to be diverted to the Woodward Avenue treatment plant, where some was bypassed into Lake Ontario.

McKinnon said heavy rains carried tree limbs and trunks down the escarpment into Sydenham Creek, and that debris subsequently clogged grates and drains.

Dundas flooding may have been exacerbated by slower-than-normal response to clear debris

Longtime business owner has seen flooding, but never impacted like this

News Apr 21, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Thursday night's overflow of Sydenham Creek due to heavy rain was not a surprise, but a possibly slower-than-normal response to clear debris from the channel at York Road and Cootes Drive may have resulted in more significant flooding.

Russ Woodward, owner of CroDon Kitchen and Bath at 69 King St. E. steps away from the Sydenham Creek channel and epicentre of the flooding said Friday there have been similar incidents at least three times in the past 15 years, but for the first time last night he saw significant impacts with seven feet of water in the store's basement.

Woodward said he had to get all electricity to the building cut off, because the breaker panel was submerged under water.

He believes the delayed response to the York and Cootes channel site to remove debris blocking the flow of water was a major factor in the severity of the flooding. He said previous responses included workers that knew the area well, and were aware of past flooding and where to go, but that some of those workers may have moved to different areas. 

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"There was ample time for (debris) to be cleared out of there," Woodward said. "It's happened before."

He said the water knocked over a fence between his property and the Tim Hortons next door, then burst through a basement window into the CroDon building. Although he's seen similar overflowing of the creek banks in heavy rain, he's never seen a result like this in his family-run business' 40-year history.

"The basement filled up like a fishbowl," he said.

A contractor at the Sydenham Creek channel between York Road and Cootes Drive who would not give his name said on Friday afternoon that crews arrived at the site between 8 and 9 p.m. and immediately began removing debris.

The official first reports of flooding in Dundas from Hamilton fire service were shortly after 7:30 p.m.

Jonathon Bastien of the Hamilton Conservation Authority said Dundas received 75 millimetres of rain on Thursday night. He said the watercourse related flooding experienced in Dundas was the result of significant flows in Sydenham Creek overtopping its banks as a result of debris obstructions at culverts.

The authority had issued a flood watch at 4:15 p.m. on Thursday. Rain had already been falling for much of the day, with 20 to 25 millimetres estimated to have fallen by 4:15 p.m.

Dan McKinnon, the City of Hamilton's general manager of public works, said the nearby Dundas Wastewater Treatment Plant yard was under about 45 centimetres of water, but operations of the plant were not affected. However, the heavier-than-normal flows had to be diverted to the Woodward Avenue treatment plant, where some was bypassed into Lake Ontario.

McKinnon said heavy rains carried tree limbs and trunks down the escarpment into Sydenham Creek, and that debris subsequently clogged grates and drains.

Dundas flooding may have been exacerbated by slower-than-normal response to clear debris

Longtime business owner has seen flooding, but never impacted like this

News Apr 21, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Thursday night's overflow of Sydenham Creek due to heavy rain was not a surprise, but a possibly slower-than-normal response to clear debris from the channel at York Road and Cootes Drive may have resulted in more significant flooding.

Russ Woodward, owner of CroDon Kitchen and Bath at 69 King St. E. steps away from the Sydenham Creek channel and epicentre of the flooding said Friday there have been similar incidents at least three times in the past 15 years, but for the first time last night he saw significant impacts with seven feet of water in the store's basement.

Woodward said he had to get all electricity to the building cut off, because the breaker panel was submerged under water.

He believes the delayed response to the York and Cootes channel site to remove debris blocking the flow of water was a major factor in the severity of the flooding. He said previous responses included workers that knew the area well, and were aware of past flooding and where to go, but that some of those workers may have moved to different areas. 

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"There was ample time for (debris) to be cleared out of there," Woodward said. "It's happened before."

He said the water knocked over a fence between his property and the Tim Hortons next door, then burst through a basement window into the CroDon building. Although he's seen similar overflowing of the creek banks in heavy rain, he's never seen a result like this in his family-run business' 40-year history.

"The basement filled up like a fishbowl," he said.

A contractor at the Sydenham Creek channel between York Road and Cootes Drive who would not give his name said on Friday afternoon that crews arrived at the site between 8 and 9 p.m. and immediately began removing debris.

The official first reports of flooding in Dundas from Hamilton fire service were shortly after 7:30 p.m.

Jonathon Bastien of the Hamilton Conservation Authority said Dundas received 75 millimetres of rain on Thursday night. He said the watercourse related flooding experienced in Dundas was the result of significant flows in Sydenham Creek overtopping its banks as a result of debris obstructions at culverts.

The authority had issued a flood watch at 4:15 p.m. on Thursday. Rain had already been falling for much of the day, with 20 to 25 millimetres estimated to have fallen by 4:15 p.m.

Dan McKinnon, the City of Hamilton's general manager of public works, said the nearby Dundas Wastewater Treatment Plant yard was under about 45 centimetres of water, but operations of the plant were not affected. However, the heavier-than-normal flows had to be diverted to the Woodward Avenue treatment plant, where some was bypassed into Lake Ontario.

McKinnon said heavy rains carried tree limbs and trunks down the escarpment into Sydenham Creek, and that debris subsequently clogged grates and drains.