Hamilton’s historic King George School up for sale

News Apr 20, 2017 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

The former King George elementary school near Tim Hortons Field is being offered for sale to a list of public agencies that includes the city and other school boards — and already has at least one potential buyer.

Hamilton public school board trustees agreed earlier this month to initiate the first phase of their property disposition protocol for the 106-year-old Gage Avenue North school, closed in 2012 following an accommodation review.

Only the board’s Dundas Central, Tapleytown and Hamilton Central schools are older.

Board chair Todd White said King George’s sale is made possible by the severing of the school’s 0.76-hectare property from the site of the former Parkview high school, demolished for a parking lot that will serve a new high school being built at Scott Park.

He said King George is in the final stages of getting a heritage designation from the city, so another parking lot there is “not even an option unless city council allows it.

“Whoever the new owner is, presumably that building will remain on that site and be subject to potential heritage factors,” White said.

Coun. Matthew Green, whose Ward 3 includes the King George property, said he’d like to use his area-rating funds to buy the “gorgeous building” if possible.

He said he doesn’t expect the city to do so and hopes to work with others, including potentially Hamilton’s Indigenous communities, to find a new use.

“I would love to see a creative opportunity there for a partnership with some of our service providers, either becoming a bit of a hub, or potentially some housing features might be added in there,” Green said.

“We want to make sure we protect it and its heritage features, and we want to make sure that it’s the right, appropriate planning for the community, in terms of what goes in there next.”

White said trustees have only approved selling King George to a public agency and those who are interested have six months to reach a deal with the board.

He said the Hamilton Tiger-Cats and others have previously expressed some interest, but any move to sell the school on the open market requires separate trustee approval and will only come after public bidders have had their chance to buy it.

“The Ticats are not a preferred bidder, so if there’s interest there, that would be a potential partnership between them and potentially the city,” White said.

 

Hamilton’s historic King George School up for sale

Area’s councillor hopes to find public use for ‘gorgeous building’

News Apr 20, 2017 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

The former King George elementary school near Tim Hortons Field is being offered for sale to a list of public agencies that includes the city and other school boards — and already has at least one potential buyer.

Hamilton public school board trustees agreed earlier this month to initiate the first phase of their property disposition protocol for the 106-year-old Gage Avenue North school, closed in 2012 following an accommodation review.

Only the board’s Dundas Central, Tapleytown and Hamilton Central schools are older.

Board chair Todd White said King George’s sale is made possible by the severing of the school’s 0.76-hectare property from the site of the former Parkview high school, demolished for a parking lot that will serve a new high school being built at Scott Park.

“We want to make sure we protect it and its heritage features, and we want to make sure that it’s the right, appropriate planning for the community, in terms of what goes in there next.”

He said King George is in the final stages of getting a heritage designation from the city, so another parking lot there is “not even an option unless city council allows it.

“Whoever the new owner is, presumably that building will remain on that site and be subject to potential heritage factors,” White said.

Coun. Matthew Green, whose Ward 3 includes the King George property, said he’d like to use his area-rating funds to buy the “gorgeous building” if possible.

He said he doesn’t expect the city to do so and hopes to work with others, including potentially Hamilton’s Indigenous communities, to find a new use.

“I would love to see a creative opportunity there for a partnership with some of our service providers, either becoming a bit of a hub, or potentially some housing features might be added in there,” Green said.

“We want to make sure we protect it and its heritage features, and we want to make sure that it’s the right, appropriate planning for the community, in terms of what goes in there next.”

White said trustees have only approved selling King George to a public agency and those who are interested have six months to reach a deal with the board.

He said the Hamilton Tiger-Cats and others have previously expressed some interest, but any move to sell the school on the open market requires separate trustee approval and will only come after public bidders have had their chance to buy it.

“The Ticats are not a preferred bidder, so if there’s interest there, that would be a potential partnership between them and potentially the city,” White said.

 

Hamilton’s historic King George School up for sale

Area’s councillor hopes to find public use for ‘gorgeous building’

News Apr 20, 2017 by Richard Leitner Stoney Creek News

The former King George elementary school near Tim Hortons Field is being offered for sale to a list of public agencies that includes the city and other school boards — and already has at least one potential buyer.

Hamilton public school board trustees agreed earlier this month to initiate the first phase of their property disposition protocol for the 106-year-old Gage Avenue North school, closed in 2012 following an accommodation review.

Only the board’s Dundas Central, Tapleytown and Hamilton Central schools are older.

Board chair Todd White said King George’s sale is made possible by the severing of the school’s 0.76-hectare property from the site of the former Parkview high school, demolished for a parking lot that will serve a new high school being built at Scott Park.

“We want to make sure we protect it and its heritage features, and we want to make sure that it’s the right, appropriate planning for the community, in terms of what goes in there next.”

He said King George is in the final stages of getting a heritage designation from the city, so another parking lot there is “not even an option unless city council allows it.

“Whoever the new owner is, presumably that building will remain on that site and be subject to potential heritage factors,” White said.

Coun. Matthew Green, whose Ward 3 includes the King George property, said he’d like to use his area-rating funds to buy the “gorgeous building” if possible.

He said he doesn’t expect the city to do so and hopes to work with others, including potentially Hamilton’s Indigenous communities, to find a new use.

“I would love to see a creative opportunity there for a partnership with some of our service providers, either becoming a bit of a hub, or potentially some housing features might be added in there,” Green said.

“We want to make sure we protect it and its heritage features, and we want to make sure that it’s the right, appropriate planning for the community, in terms of what goes in there next.”

White said trustees have only approved selling King George to a public agency and those who are interested have six months to reach a deal with the board.

He said the Hamilton Tiger-Cats and others have previously expressed some interest, but any move to sell the school on the open market requires separate trustee approval and will only come after public bidders have had their chance to buy it.

“The Ticats are not a preferred bidder, so if there’s interest there, that would be a potential partnership between them and potentially the city,” White said.