Ancaster Soccer Club gives school plan red card

News Apr 06, 2017 by Richard Leitner Ancaster News

The Ancaster Soccer Club wants Hamilton public school board trustees to give the boot to a proposal to rebuild C.H. Bray Elementary School at Ancaster High School.

John Simeonidis, the club’s competitive director, says if the plan does move forward, it will displace several of the 10 soccer fields behind the Jerseyville Road high school presently used by 2,400 players on rep and house league teams.

He said the club has had a longstanding arrangement with the school board to maintain the fields in return for their use outside the school year and will have to limit the number of teams if playing space is lost to a new school.

“You come here and they are jammed full throughout the entire season, going on from May until September,” Simeonidis said. “Once schools are out, from morning to night, they’re packed.”

The proposal to rebuild C.H. Bray somewhere on the playing fields is one of three potential plans being put forward by a volunteer committee that reviewed accommodation options for students at Bray, Fessenden, Ancaster Senior, Queen’s Rangers and Rousseau.

The three options and a plan favoured by board staff will be outlined in a report to be presented to trustees on April 10.

The staff option leaves Ancaster High alone, rebuilding C.H. Bray on its current Dunham Road property as part of a plan to also rebuild Rousseau, expand Ancaster Senior and close Fessenden and Queen’s Rangers.

Trustees are scheduled to hear public delegations on the four options on May 8 before making a final decision on June 5.

The soccer club has started a petition against the Ancaster High option — it had 322 signatures as of Monday — and won the support of Brad Kuhn, who sat on Ancaster town council in the 1990s.

Kuhn said the former Wentworth Country secondary school board — led by Walter Ferguson, father of current Coun. Lloyd Ferguson — envisioned the 17.4-hectare property as being more than just the home of Ancaster High, built in 1959.

He said the elder Ferguson wanted the grounds to be available for Ancaster youth “to have a place to play and enjoy themselves, whether it be basketball, baseball, track, whatever it is, and that this place should be kept in perpetuity.”

Kuhn said the fields have put Ancaster on the map, hosting the soccer club’s annual Heritage Day tournament in June, which attracts more than 300 teams, as well as cross-country meets and other sporting events.

He said he worries rebuilding C.H. Bray at Ancaster High will be a short-sighted financial decision that will only see the elementary school’s existing property sold for housing.

“Green space is so valuable and this is just a jewel of a property behind the school and we need to maintain it,” Kuhn said. “This is quite a mecca for good things happening for kids.”


Ancaster Soccer Club gives school plan red card

Former town councillor backs bid to keep playing fields

News Apr 06, 2017 by Richard Leitner Ancaster News

The Ancaster Soccer Club wants Hamilton public school board trustees to give the boot to a proposal to rebuild C.H. Bray Elementary School at Ancaster High School.

John Simeonidis, the club’s competitive director, says if the plan does move forward, it will displace several of the 10 soccer fields behind the Jerseyville Road high school presently used by 2,400 players on rep and house league teams.

He said the club has had a longstanding arrangement with the school board to maintain the fields in return for their use outside the school year and will have to limit the number of teams if playing space is lost to a new school.

“You come here and they are jammed full throughout the entire season, going on from May until September,” Simeonidis said. “Once schools are out, from morning to night, they’re packed.”

“You come here and they are jammed full throughout the entire season, going on from May until September.”

The proposal to rebuild C.H. Bray somewhere on the playing fields is one of three potential plans being put forward by a volunteer committee that reviewed accommodation options for students at Bray, Fessenden, Ancaster Senior, Queen’s Rangers and Rousseau.

The three options and a plan favoured by board staff will be outlined in a report to be presented to trustees on April 10.

The staff option leaves Ancaster High alone, rebuilding C.H. Bray on its current Dunham Road property as part of a plan to also rebuild Rousseau, expand Ancaster Senior and close Fessenden and Queen’s Rangers.

Trustees are scheduled to hear public delegations on the four options on May 8 before making a final decision on June 5.

The soccer club has started a petition against the Ancaster High option — it had 322 signatures as of Monday — and won the support of Brad Kuhn, who sat on Ancaster town council in the 1990s.

Kuhn said the former Wentworth Country secondary school board — led by Walter Ferguson, father of current Coun. Lloyd Ferguson — envisioned the 17.4-hectare property as being more than just the home of Ancaster High, built in 1959.

He said the elder Ferguson wanted the grounds to be available for Ancaster youth “to have a place to play and enjoy themselves, whether it be basketball, baseball, track, whatever it is, and that this place should be kept in perpetuity.”

Kuhn said the fields have put Ancaster on the map, hosting the soccer club’s annual Heritage Day tournament in June, which attracts more than 300 teams, as well as cross-country meets and other sporting events.

He said he worries rebuilding C.H. Bray at Ancaster High will be a short-sighted financial decision that will only see the elementary school’s existing property sold for housing.

“Green space is so valuable and this is just a jewel of a property behind the school and we need to maintain it,” Kuhn said. “This is quite a mecca for good things happening for kids.”


Ancaster Soccer Club gives school plan red card

Former town councillor backs bid to keep playing fields

News Apr 06, 2017 by Richard Leitner Ancaster News

The Ancaster Soccer Club wants Hamilton public school board trustees to give the boot to a proposal to rebuild C.H. Bray Elementary School at Ancaster High School.

John Simeonidis, the club’s competitive director, says if the plan does move forward, it will displace several of the 10 soccer fields behind the Jerseyville Road high school presently used by 2,400 players on rep and house league teams.

He said the club has had a longstanding arrangement with the school board to maintain the fields in return for their use outside the school year and will have to limit the number of teams if playing space is lost to a new school.

“You come here and they are jammed full throughout the entire season, going on from May until September,” Simeonidis said. “Once schools are out, from morning to night, they’re packed.”

“You come here and they are jammed full throughout the entire season, going on from May until September.”

The proposal to rebuild C.H. Bray somewhere on the playing fields is one of three potential plans being put forward by a volunteer committee that reviewed accommodation options for students at Bray, Fessenden, Ancaster Senior, Queen’s Rangers and Rousseau.

The three options and a plan favoured by board staff will be outlined in a report to be presented to trustees on April 10.

The staff option leaves Ancaster High alone, rebuilding C.H. Bray on its current Dunham Road property as part of a plan to also rebuild Rousseau, expand Ancaster Senior and close Fessenden and Queen’s Rangers.

Trustees are scheduled to hear public delegations on the four options on May 8 before making a final decision on June 5.

The soccer club has started a petition against the Ancaster High option — it had 322 signatures as of Monday — and won the support of Brad Kuhn, who sat on Ancaster town council in the 1990s.

Kuhn said the former Wentworth Country secondary school board — led by Walter Ferguson, father of current Coun. Lloyd Ferguson — envisioned the 17.4-hectare property as being more than just the home of Ancaster High, built in 1959.

He said the elder Ferguson wanted the grounds to be available for Ancaster youth “to have a place to play and enjoy themselves, whether it be basketball, baseball, track, whatever it is, and that this place should be kept in perpetuity.”

Kuhn said the fields have put Ancaster on the map, hosting the soccer club’s annual Heritage Day tournament in June, which attracts more than 300 teams, as well as cross-country meets and other sporting events.

He said he worries rebuilding C.H. Bray at Ancaster High will be a short-sighted financial decision that will only see the elementary school’s existing property sold for housing.

“Green space is so valuable and this is just a jewel of a property behind the school and we need to maintain it,” Kuhn said. “This is quite a mecca for good things happening for kids.”