Dundas Museum cutting edge using technology in education

News Mar 27, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

The Dundas Museum and Archives isn't just on the cutting edge in using technology to develop educational programs, it appears it's actually doing the cutting.

Dr. John Picone, also known by his alter-ego Professor Interrogo, led a two-hour program last Thursday morning for a Grade 3 class from Dundana School titled Chores and Challenges: A day in the life of a child of an early Dundas settler.

"They're high energy — but constantly focused," Picone said. "They're here, they're nowhere else."

He credits much of that focus to the use of iPads. At one point during the morning, groups of students used their iPads to take photos of dozens of related artifacts from the museum's collection — a barrel, a yoke used to carry water, a butter churn — then typed three detailed questions into the machine. As they completed the assignment, the photos and questions popped onto Picone's iPad screen. With a tap of a photo, he could read the group's questions. He could also forward any group's submission back to the rest of the class.

"Just because it's an iPad, the kids are engaged," Picone said.

He started using the tool in September for the programs he has developed over the past three years as director of education at the Dundas museum. He's not aware of any of museums using the technology in education programs.

But Picone thinks the opportunities are numerous, and he wants to do more with the technology.

"How can this facilitate brand new learning, where learning is a result of the technology?" he asked.

Because it's still new, Picone and Dundas museum education co-ordinator Karen Felker are doing the research and experimentation.

Picone has submitted a proposal to the Ontario Museum Association to do a one-hour workshop for museum educators on using technology. The association is accepting workshop proposals until the end of March for next October’s convention. Executive director Marie Lalonde said they have Picone's proposal, but with time left before the deadline, review of the submissions has not started. The conference is scheduled for Oct. 11 to 13 in Kingston.

Picone is already experimenting with the use of QR codes that an iPad uses to link to a website. It allows a user to view an artifact in the museum and immediately link to related information, or the history connected to the artifact, on the Internet.

Right now, Picone sets up those links. He used it in a very successful March break museum scavenger hunt. The next step he wants to take is having students develop those links themselves.

"I really think we're doing the cutting of the cutting edge," Picone said.

He sees the traditional classroom changing, or being replaced altogether. He said it's moving away from the "master and apprentice" philosophy that developed after the Industrial Revolution.

"The museum and institutions like it are going to be the school. The museum can offer significant resources integral to education — not an extra, or a field trip," Picone said. "It's increasingly essential."

The museum currently offers 15 educational programs that complement the Ontario curriculum. Picone taught high school for more than 30 years and wants teachers to see him as their colleague, offering resources they can't access within the school itself.

Picone believes the museum's education programs should have the ability to change students. Thursday morning, they got a taste of the incredible level of responsibility children of Dundas-area settlers had in their family’s lives.

The museum's iPads were purchased with funding from ArcelorMittal Dofasco's corporate community investment fund.

For more details on the Dundas Museum and Archives’ education programs, visit dundasmuseum.ca/programs/education-programs.


Dundas Museum cutting edge using technology in education

iPads present opportunities to enhance programming

News Mar 27, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

The Dundas Museum and Archives isn't just on the cutting edge in using technology to develop educational programs, it appears it's actually doing the cutting.

Dr. John Picone, also known by his alter-ego Professor Interrogo, led a two-hour program last Thursday morning for a Grade 3 class from Dundana School titled Chores and Challenges: A day in the life of a child of an early Dundas settler.

"They're high energy — but constantly focused," Picone said. "They're here, they're nowhere else."

He credits much of that focus to the use of iPads. At one point during the morning, groups of students used their iPads to take photos of dozens of related artifacts from the museum's collection — a barrel, a yoke used to carry water, a butter churn — then typed three detailed questions into the machine. As they completed the assignment, the photos and questions popped onto Picone's iPad screen. With a tap of a photo, he could read the group's questions. He could also forward any group's submission back to the rest of the class.

"Just because it's an iPad, the kids are engaged," Picone said.

He started using the tool in September for the programs he has developed over the past three years as director of education at the Dundas museum. He's not aware of any of museums using the technology in education programs.

But Picone thinks the opportunities are numerous, and he wants to do more with the technology.

"How can this facilitate brand new learning, where learning is a result of the technology?" he asked.

Because it's still new, Picone and Dundas museum education co-ordinator Karen Felker are doing the research and experimentation.

Picone has submitted a proposal to the Ontario Museum Association to do a one-hour workshop for museum educators on using technology. The association is accepting workshop proposals until the end of March for next October’s convention. Executive director Marie Lalonde said they have Picone's proposal, but with time left before the deadline, review of the submissions has not started. The conference is scheduled for Oct. 11 to 13 in Kingston.

Picone is already experimenting with the use of QR codes that an iPad uses to link to a website. It allows a user to view an artifact in the museum and immediately link to related information, or the history connected to the artifact, on the Internet.

Right now, Picone sets up those links. He used it in a very successful March break museum scavenger hunt. The next step he wants to take is having students develop those links themselves.

"I really think we're doing the cutting of the cutting edge," Picone said.

He sees the traditional classroom changing, or being replaced altogether. He said it's moving away from the "master and apprentice" philosophy that developed after the Industrial Revolution.

"The museum and institutions like it are going to be the school. The museum can offer significant resources integral to education — not an extra, or a field trip," Picone said. "It's increasingly essential."

The museum currently offers 15 educational programs that complement the Ontario curriculum. Picone taught high school for more than 30 years and wants teachers to see him as their colleague, offering resources they can't access within the school itself.

Picone believes the museum's education programs should have the ability to change students. Thursday morning, they got a taste of the incredible level of responsibility children of Dundas-area settlers had in their family’s lives.

The museum's iPads were purchased with funding from ArcelorMittal Dofasco's corporate community investment fund.

For more details on the Dundas Museum and Archives’ education programs, visit dundasmuseum.ca/programs/education-programs.


Dundas Museum cutting edge using technology in education

iPads present opportunities to enhance programming

News Mar 27, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

The Dundas Museum and Archives isn't just on the cutting edge in using technology to develop educational programs, it appears it's actually doing the cutting.

Dr. John Picone, also known by his alter-ego Professor Interrogo, led a two-hour program last Thursday morning for a Grade 3 class from Dundana School titled Chores and Challenges: A day in the life of a child of an early Dundas settler.

"They're high energy — but constantly focused," Picone said. "They're here, they're nowhere else."

He credits much of that focus to the use of iPads. At one point during the morning, groups of students used their iPads to take photos of dozens of related artifacts from the museum's collection — a barrel, a yoke used to carry water, a butter churn — then typed three detailed questions into the machine. As they completed the assignment, the photos and questions popped onto Picone's iPad screen. With a tap of a photo, he could read the group's questions. He could also forward any group's submission back to the rest of the class.

"Just because it's an iPad, the kids are engaged," Picone said.

He started using the tool in September for the programs he has developed over the past three years as director of education at the Dundas museum. He's not aware of any of museums using the technology in education programs.

But Picone thinks the opportunities are numerous, and he wants to do more with the technology.

"How can this facilitate brand new learning, where learning is a result of the technology?" he asked.

Because it's still new, Picone and Dundas museum education co-ordinator Karen Felker are doing the research and experimentation.

Picone has submitted a proposal to the Ontario Museum Association to do a one-hour workshop for museum educators on using technology. The association is accepting workshop proposals until the end of March for next October’s convention. Executive director Marie Lalonde said they have Picone's proposal, but with time left before the deadline, review of the submissions has not started. The conference is scheduled for Oct. 11 to 13 in Kingston.

Picone is already experimenting with the use of QR codes that an iPad uses to link to a website. It allows a user to view an artifact in the museum and immediately link to related information, or the history connected to the artifact, on the Internet.

Right now, Picone sets up those links. He used it in a very successful March break museum scavenger hunt. The next step he wants to take is having students develop those links themselves.

"I really think we're doing the cutting of the cutting edge," Picone said.

He sees the traditional classroom changing, or being replaced altogether. He said it's moving away from the "master and apprentice" philosophy that developed after the Industrial Revolution.

"The museum and institutions like it are going to be the school. The museum can offer significant resources integral to education — not an extra, or a field trip," Picone said. "It's increasingly essential."

The museum currently offers 15 educational programs that complement the Ontario curriculum. Picone taught high school for more than 30 years and wants teachers to see him as their colleague, offering resources they can't access within the school itself.

Picone believes the museum's education programs should have the ability to change students. Thursday morning, they got a taste of the incredible level of responsibility children of Dundas-area settlers had in their family’s lives.

The museum's iPads were purchased with funding from ArcelorMittal Dofasco's corporate community investment fund.

For more details on the Dundas Museum and Archives’ education programs, visit dundasmuseum.ca/programs/education-programs.