Tim Hortons Field contractor apologizes for facility’s construction problems to Hamilton politicians

News Mar 06, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The president of Kenaidan Contracting Ltd., one of the companies involved in building the $145-million Tim Hortons Field, apologized to a Hamilton council committee for their part in the project’s delays.

David Kirkland said Kenaidan, a minority partner in Ontario Sports Solutions (Bouyques Building Canada is the majority partner) which constructed the stadium, prides itself on its ability to work cooperatively and collaboratively during projects.

Infrastructure Ontario oversaw the stadium project.

“We want our projects to be really successful,” Kirkland told members of the audit, finance and administrative committee March 6. “Clearly this is not what happened at the stadium and for that we actually are sorry. It’s something that we regret. We will regret for a long time in terms of the impact on our reputation.”

Kirkland’s apologetic acknowledgement of the company’s involvement with the Tim Hortons Field project comes when a possible settlement could be in the works without legal action taking place.

Almost a year ago the city issued a notice of action in Hamilton Superior Court about the stadium project. The Hamilton Tiger-Cats filed similar court action.

Hamilton’s notice named Ontario Sports Solutions, and its principles, Kenaidan Contracting Ltd., and Bouygues Building Canada, as well as the 2015 Pan Am organizing committee, Infrastructure Ontario and the Hamilton Tiger-Cats Football Club.

The claim asked for about $35 million in damages for breach of contract, negligence and misrepresentation when it came to the planning, procurement, design, construction, project management and other issues. Of the monetary damages, $14 million would be referred to the Tiger-Cats.

Kirkland said the work done on the stadium by his company is “not representative of our capabilities as a contractor,” he said.

Stadium construction began in 2013 and Infrastructure Ontario stated the stadium would be completed by June 30, 2014 in time for the Tiger-Cats to play in the facility. However, the project suffered through a number of delays and it was still under construction by Sept. 1, 2014. It officially opened in May 2015, more than 10 months overdue.

City officials have stated the stadium still has deficiencies. A separate investigation has been ongoing to determine why a tower speaker fell into the stands of the stadium last year.

Kirkland said Kenaidan, based in Mississauga, has worked on many other projects in Hamilton, including a water retention pond and the West Harbour GO station. Other Ontario projects Kenaidan is involved in include the Port Hope Water Treatment facility and the Eglinton Crosstown LRT Western Tunnel.

Kirkland said if given another chance to bid and win a tender for a project in Hamilton, “I will give my personal guarantee … we will demonstrate to the city the quality of the contract we built our reputation on.”

Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson, who as chair of the committee that oversaw the stadium construction, said the delays “clearly caused this city and us as council members a lot of embarrassment. We can’t go through that experience again.”

Members of the committee went behind closed doors to discuss the commercial relationship between the city and Kenaidan.

 

Tim Hortons Field contractor apologizes for facility’s construction problems to Hamilton politicians

News Mar 06, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The president of Kenaidan Contracting Ltd., one of the companies involved in building the $145-million Tim Hortons Field, apologized to a Hamilton council committee for their part in the project’s delays.

David Kirkland said Kenaidan, a minority partner in Ontario Sports Solutions (Bouyques Building Canada is the majority partner) which constructed the stadium, prides itself on its ability to work cooperatively and collaboratively during projects.

Infrastructure Ontario oversaw the stadium project.

“We want our projects to be really successful,” Kirkland told members of the audit, finance and administrative committee March 6. “Clearly this is not what happened at the stadium and for that we actually are sorry. It’s something that we regret. We will regret for a long time in terms of the impact on our reputation.”

Kirkland’s apologetic acknowledgement of the company’s involvement with the Tim Hortons Field project comes when a possible settlement could be in the works without legal action taking place.

Almost a year ago the city issued a notice of action in Hamilton Superior Court about the stadium project. The Hamilton Tiger-Cats filed similar court action.

Hamilton’s notice named Ontario Sports Solutions, and its principles, Kenaidan Contracting Ltd., and Bouygues Building Canada, as well as the 2015 Pan Am organizing committee, Infrastructure Ontario and the Hamilton Tiger-Cats Football Club.

The claim asked for about $35 million in damages for breach of contract, negligence and misrepresentation when it came to the planning, procurement, design, construction, project management and other issues. Of the monetary damages, $14 million would be referred to the Tiger-Cats.

Kirkland said the work done on the stadium by his company is “not representative of our capabilities as a contractor,” he said.

Stadium construction began in 2013 and Infrastructure Ontario stated the stadium would be completed by June 30, 2014 in time for the Tiger-Cats to play in the facility. However, the project suffered through a number of delays and it was still under construction by Sept. 1, 2014. It officially opened in May 2015, more than 10 months overdue.

City officials have stated the stadium still has deficiencies. A separate investigation has been ongoing to determine why a tower speaker fell into the stands of the stadium last year.

Kirkland said Kenaidan, based in Mississauga, has worked on many other projects in Hamilton, including a water retention pond and the West Harbour GO station. Other Ontario projects Kenaidan is involved in include the Port Hope Water Treatment facility and the Eglinton Crosstown LRT Western Tunnel.

Kirkland said if given another chance to bid and win a tender for a project in Hamilton, “I will give my personal guarantee … we will demonstrate to the city the quality of the contract we built our reputation on.”

Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson, who as chair of the committee that oversaw the stadium construction, said the delays “clearly caused this city and us as council members a lot of embarrassment. We can’t go through that experience again.”

Members of the committee went behind closed doors to discuss the commercial relationship between the city and Kenaidan.

 

Tim Hortons Field contractor apologizes for facility’s construction problems to Hamilton politicians

News Mar 06, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The president of Kenaidan Contracting Ltd., one of the companies involved in building the $145-million Tim Hortons Field, apologized to a Hamilton council committee for their part in the project’s delays.

David Kirkland said Kenaidan, a minority partner in Ontario Sports Solutions (Bouyques Building Canada is the majority partner) which constructed the stadium, prides itself on its ability to work cooperatively and collaboratively during projects.

Infrastructure Ontario oversaw the stadium project.

“We want our projects to be really successful,” Kirkland told members of the audit, finance and administrative committee March 6. “Clearly this is not what happened at the stadium and for that we actually are sorry. It’s something that we regret. We will regret for a long time in terms of the impact on our reputation.”

Kirkland’s apologetic acknowledgement of the company’s involvement with the Tim Hortons Field project comes when a possible settlement could be in the works without legal action taking place.

Almost a year ago the city issued a notice of action in Hamilton Superior Court about the stadium project. The Hamilton Tiger-Cats filed similar court action.

Hamilton’s notice named Ontario Sports Solutions, and its principles, Kenaidan Contracting Ltd., and Bouygues Building Canada, as well as the 2015 Pan Am organizing committee, Infrastructure Ontario and the Hamilton Tiger-Cats Football Club.

The claim asked for about $35 million in damages for breach of contract, negligence and misrepresentation when it came to the planning, procurement, design, construction, project management and other issues. Of the monetary damages, $14 million would be referred to the Tiger-Cats.

Kirkland said the work done on the stadium by his company is “not representative of our capabilities as a contractor,” he said.

Stadium construction began in 2013 and Infrastructure Ontario stated the stadium would be completed by June 30, 2014 in time for the Tiger-Cats to play in the facility. However, the project suffered through a number of delays and it was still under construction by Sept. 1, 2014. It officially opened in May 2015, more than 10 months overdue.

City officials have stated the stadium still has deficiencies. A separate investigation has been ongoing to determine why a tower speaker fell into the stands of the stadium last year.

Kirkland said Kenaidan, based in Mississauga, has worked on many other projects in Hamilton, including a water retention pond and the West Harbour GO station. Other Ontario projects Kenaidan is involved in include the Port Hope Water Treatment facility and the Eglinton Crosstown LRT Western Tunnel.

Kirkland said if given another chance to bid and win a tender for a project in Hamilton, “I will give my personal guarantee … we will demonstrate to the city the quality of the contract we built our reputation on.”

Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson, who as chair of the committee that oversaw the stadium construction, said the delays “clearly caused this city and us as council members a lot of embarrassment. We can’t go through that experience again.”

Members of the committee went behind closed doors to discuss the commercial relationship between the city and Kenaidan.