Hamilton councillors turn down 19-storey apartment development

News Feb 13, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

A developer proposing a 19-storey apartment project in Stoney Creek is preparing for a long battle against the city to get it constructed.

Hamilton politicians at their Feb. 8 council meeting denied the application for a 219-residential unit development at 860 Queenston Road and are expecting a difficult contest with New Horizon Development Group when it appeals the city’s decision to the Ontario Municipal Board.

“I’m amazed that we have a committee structure of various people throughout the municipality not realizing what a benefit this is to the city on a more global perspective,” Conrad Zurini, representing New Horizon Development Group told the Stoney Creek News.

Politicians agreed with the planning committee that had earlier rejected the zoning bylaw and Official Plan amendment for the project, east of Centennial Parkway on 0.54 hectares of land, even though planning staff had recommended approval.

Councillors included in the motion an amendment to hire outside experts at an upside cost of about $220,000 to fight the decision at the OMB. Both Mayor Fried Eisenberger and Mountain Councillor Terry Whitehead opposed the motion.

Zurini said taxpayers will be footing the bill for this OMB case.

“This is going to be expensive for us applicants, but also for the city, which will have to hire outside representation,” said Zurini. “It’s extremely disappointing and disheartening that taxpayers’ money is going to be used to fight an initiative that we had overwhelming support on from the staff. It checked every box from the staff in terms of good planning principles.”

Ward 9 Councillor Doug Conley, who represents the area where the development is being proposed, said he was voting against it because of the height. He said he didn’t want to set a precedent by allowing a 19-storey building in the area.

The proposal is only on 0.38 hectares of the total 1.2 hectare land, currently occupied by a two-storey office building that houses ReMax Escarpment Reality. The structure is estimated to have been constructed in 1976.

Zurini said the development will have available access to highways, public transit and retail, will preserve green space and help to maintain wildlife habitat on the undeveloped 1.2-hectare portion of the property.

Politicians had issues with the proposed development’s height, the use of the nearby Battlefield Plaza’s entrance by residents to access the building, and the high density the development would create.

There will be about 300 parking spaces, including under ground.

City planner Cam Thomas said at the planning committee meeting the density for the area is about 200 units per hectare. The development would see the density increase to 489 units per hectare, he said.

Zurini said the developer will seek mediation first to solve the issues councillors identified.

“We are hoping to discuss, from a pure planning perspective what is wrong with this project and why it can’t fit where we’ve designated to put it,” he said.

Hamilton councillors turn down 19-storey apartment development

News Feb 13, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

A developer proposing a 19-storey apartment project in Stoney Creek is preparing for a long battle against the city to get it constructed.

Hamilton politicians at their Feb. 8 council meeting denied the application for a 219-residential unit development at 860 Queenston Road and are expecting a difficult contest with New Horizon Development Group when it appeals the city’s decision to the Ontario Municipal Board.

“I’m amazed that we have a committee structure of various people throughout the municipality not realizing what a benefit this is to the city on a more global perspective,” Conrad Zurini, representing New Horizon Development Group told the Stoney Creek News.

Politicians agreed with the planning committee that had earlier rejected the zoning bylaw and Official Plan amendment for the project, east of Centennial Parkway on 0.54 hectares of land, even though planning staff had recommended approval.

Councillors included in the motion an amendment to hire outside experts at an upside cost of about $220,000 to fight the decision at the OMB. Both Mayor Fried Eisenberger and Mountain Councillor Terry Whitehead opposed the motion.

Zurini said taxpayers will be footing the bill for this OMB case.

“This is going to be expensive for us applicants, but also for the city, which will have to hire outside representation,” said Zurini. “It’s extremely disappointing and disheartening that taxpayers’ money is going to be used to fight an initiative that we had overwhelming support on from the staff. It checked every box from the staff in terms of good planning principles.”

Ward 9 Councillor Doug Conley, who represents the area where the development is being proposed, said he was voting against it because of the height. He said he didn’t want to set a precedent by allowing a 19-storey building in the area.

The proposal is only on 0.38 hectares of the total 1.2 hectare land, currently occupied by a two-storey office building that houses ReMax Escarpment Reality. The structure is estimated to have been constructed in 1976.

Zurini said the development will have available access to highways, public transit and retail, will preserve green space and help to maintain wildlife habitat on the undeveloped 1.2-hectare portion of the property.

Politicians had issues with the proposed development’s height, the use of the nearby Battlefield Plaza’s entrance by residents to access the building, and the high density the development would create.

There will be about 300 parking spaces, including under ground.

City planner Cam Thomas said at the planning committee meeting the density for the area is about 200 units per hectare. The development would see the density increase to 489 units per hectare, he said.

Zurini said the developer will seek mediation first to solve the issues councillors identified.

“We are hoping to discuss, from a pure planning perspective what is wrong with this project and why it can’t fit where we’ve designated to put it,” he said.

Hamilton councillors turn down 19-storey apartment development

News Feb 13, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

A developer proposing a 19-storey apartment project in Stoney Creek is preparing for a long battle against the city to get it constructed.

Hamilton politicians at their Feb. 8 council meeting denied the application for a 219-residential unit development at 860 Queenston Road and are expecting a difficult contest with New Horizon Development Group when it appeals the city’s decision to the Ontario Municipal Board.

“I’m amazed that we have a committee structure of various people throughout the municipality not realizing what a benefit this is to the city on a more global perspective,” Conrad Zurini, representing New Horizon Development Group told the Stoney Creek News.

Politicians agreed with the planning committee that had earlier rejected the zoning bylaw and Official Plan amendment for the project, east of Centennial Parkway on 0.54 hectares of land, even though planning staff had recommended approval.

Councillors included in the motion an amendment to hire outside experts at an upside cost of about $220,000 to fight the decision at the OMB. Both Mayor Fried Eisenberger and Mountain Councillor Terry Whitehead opposed the motion.

Zurini said taxpayers will be footing the bill for this OMB case.

“This is going to be expensive for us applicants, but also for the city, which will have to hire outside representation,” said Zurini. “It’s extremely disappointing and disheartening that taxpayers’ money is going to be used to fight an initiative that we had overwhelming support on from the staff. It checked every box from the staff in terms of good planning principles.”

Ward 9 Councillor Doug Conley, who represents the area where the development is being proposed, said he was voting against it because of the height. He said he didn’t want to set a precedent by allowing a 19-storey building in the area.

The proposal is only on 0.38 hectares of the total 1.2 hectare land, currently occupied by a two-storey office building that houses ReMax Escarpment Reality. The structure is estimated to have been constructed in 1976.

Zurini said the development will have available access to highways, public transit and retail, will preserve green space and help to maintain wildlife habitat on the undeveloped 1.2-hectare portion of the property.

Politicians had issues with the proposed development’s height, the use of the nearby Battlefield Plaza’s entrance by residents to access the building, and the high density the development would create.

There will be about 300 parking spaces, including under ground.

City planner Cam Thomas said at the planning committee meeting the density for the area is about 200 units per hectare. The development would see the density increase to 489 units per hectare, he said.

Zurini said the developer will seek mediation first to solve the issues councillors identified.

“We are hoping to discuss, from a pure planning perspective what is wrong with this project and why it can’t fit where we’ve designated to put it,” he said.