Dundas' Routes Youth Centre offers new programming

News Feb 10, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Raising awareness of Dundas' Routes Youth Centre is the goal of one new recruit to the 14-year-old program's board of directors.

Marley Tufts joined the board in December, shortly after the call went out to bring some new skills and fresh minds. Now, as Routes prepares for its annual dinner and silent auction — a major fundraiser that supports the free youth centre and its programs — Tufts wants to let the community not only know about the important event but also some of the new programs it provides.

"The goal is to have more youth and parents aware," Tufts said. "It's a way to ensure the quality of kids' lives in the community."

The annual dinner and silent auction is set for Friday, Feb. 24 at Dundas Lions Memorial Community Centre and features a meal prepared by Chef Ken LeFebour of Nellie James Catering in Dundas. It will also provide an opportunity to hear about the innovative ways Routes supports local youth and the challenges they may face.

Tufts pointed to a successful new youth council and improv workshops. Those new programs are just part of what Routes has to offer. In February's calender alone, there are weekly visits from McMaster University athletes, ping pong and air hockey tournaments, board games, several cafés and open mic events, peer tutoring and more.

For Tufts, though, it's important to recognize that Routes provides a safe and positive drop-in, where any kid can just hang out with their peers.

She also wants to dispel any potential myths about Routes, including any suggestion it‘s "for troubled kids."

"It's just a place for all kids," Tufts said. "There's support if you need it but the point is for kids to have fun."

And although Routes did develop from The Association of Dundas Churches, in partnership with several community leaders, Tufts stresses the youth centre is not religious or tied to the religious community.

It's also free to the youth who take part, and in a time of cutbacks to lots of youth-oriented programs, parents should be comfortable their  kids can hang out in a safe, accessible place. That's a reason for the community to help keep it financially strong.

"If teachers and parents know its available, that will reduce the stress in their lives," Tufts said.

Tufts said a regular gathering of youth play basketball on Fridays in the community centre gym.

"Not every kid has the confidence or desire to try out for the basketball team," she said. "Here, they can try things without it being competitive."

Dundas' Routes Youth Centre offers new programming

Annual fundraising dinner and silent auction on Feb. 24

News Feb 10, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Raising awareness of Dundas' Routes Youth Centre is the goal of one new recruit to the 14-year-old program's board of directors.

Marley Tufts joined the board in December, shortly after the call went out to bring some new skills and fresh minds. Now, as Routes prepares for its annual dinner and silent auction — a major fundraiser that supports the free youth centre and its programs — Tufts wants to let the community not only know about the important event but also some of the new programs it provides.

"The goal is to have more youth and parents aware," Tufts said. "It's a way to ensure the quality of kids' lives in the community."

The annual dinner and silent auction is set for Friday, Feb. 24 at Dundas Lions Memorial Community Centre and features a meal prepared by Chef Ken LeFebour of Nellie James Catering in Dundas. It will also provide an opportunity to hear about the innovative ways Routes supports local youth and the challenges they may face.

Tufts pointed to a successful new youth council and improv workshops. Those new programs are just part of what Routes has to offer. In February's calender alone, there are weekly visits from McMaster University athletes, ping pong and air hockey tournaments, board games, several cafés and open mic events, peer tutoring and more.

For Tufts, though, it's important to recognize that Routes provides a safe and positive drop-in, where any kid can just hang out with their peers.

She also wants to dispel any potential myths about Routes, including any suggestion it‘s "for troubled kids."

"It's just a place for all kids," Tufts said. "There's support if you need it but the point is for kids to have fun."

And although Routes did develop from The Association of Dundas Churches, in partnership with several community leaders, Tufts stresses the youth centre is not religious or tied to the religious community.

It's also free to the youth who take part, and in a time of cutbacks to lots of youth-oriented programs, parents should be comfortable their  kids can hang out in a safe, accessible place. That's a reason for the community to help keep it financially strong.

"If teachers and parents know its available, that will reduce the stress in their lives," Tufts said.

Tufts said a regular gathering of youth play basketball on Fridays in the community centre gym.

"Not every kid has the confidence or desire to try out for the basketball team," she said. "Here, they can try things without it being competitive."

Dundas' Routes Youth Centre offers new programming

Annual fundraising dinner and silent auction on Feb. 24

News Feb 10, 2017 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Raising awareness of Dundas' Routes Youth Centre is the goal of one new recruit to the 14-year-old program's board of directors.

Marley Tufts joined the board in December, shortly after the call went out to bring some new skills and fresh minds. Now, as Routes prepares for its annual dinner and silent auction — a major fundraiser that supports the free youth centre and its programs — Tufts wants to let the community not only know about the important event but also some of the new programs it provides.

"The goal is to have more youth and parents aware," Tufts said. "It's a way to ensure the quality of kids' lives in the community."

The annual dinner and silent auction is set for Friday, Feb. 24 at Dundas Lions Memorial Community Centre and features a meal prepared by Chef Ken LeFebour of Nellie James Catering in Dundas. It will also provide an opportunity to hear about the innovative ways Routes supports local youth and the challenges they may face.

Tufts pointed to a successful new youth council and improv workshops. Those new programs are just part of what Routes has to offer. In February's calender alone, there are weekly visits from McMaster University athletes, ping pong and air hockey tournaments, board games, several cafés and open mic events, peer tutoring and more.

For Tufts, though, it's important to recognize that Routes provides a safe and positive drop-in, where any kid can just hang out with their peers.

She also wants to dispel any potential myths about Routes, including any suggestion it‘s "for troubled kids."

"It's just a place for all kids," Tufts said. "There's support if you need it but the point is for kids to have fun."

And although Routes did develop from The Association of Dundas Churches, in partnership with several community leaders, Tufts stresses the youth centre is not religious or tied to the religious community.

It's also free to the youth who take part, and in a time of cutbacks to lots of youth-oriented programs, parents should be comfortable their  kids can hang out in a safe, accessible place. That's a reason for the community to help keep it financially strong.

"If teachers and parents know its available, that will reduce the stress in their lives," Tufts said.

Tufts said a regular gathering of youth play basketball on Fridays in the community centre gym.

"Not every kid has the confidence or desire to try out for the basketball team," she said. "Here, they can try things without it being competitive."