Only one suspect in Quebec City mosque shooting: police

News Jan 30, 2017 Toronto Star

— Quebec police are saying there is now only one person suspected in connection with the shooting at a Quebec mosque in the community of Ste-Foy that killed six people and injured 19.

One of the men considered to have carried out the deadly assault that killed six people, is now just a witness to the murders, the Surete du Quebec said in a tweet Monday afternoon.

The two men initially arrested were expected to appear in court later today, a court clerk told the Star.

The Star initially reported the names of the men given to the paper by the court clerk, but are now removing them until it becomes clear who remains a suspect in police custody.

There was a flurry of police activity on Monday morning at an apartment a few blocks from the mosque where one of the men had been renting a room in a basement. But officers left the residence around 11 a.m. without having searched his room.

The owner of the building told the Star that police told him they didn’t have the proper authorizations to search the room and that they would contact him if they obtained the proper authorizations from a judge.

Local media have reported that both men who were initially held by police are students at Quebec City’s Université Laval. The Star has not been able to confirm this information and a university spokesman also said he could not confirm it.

Eric Bauce, the school’s vice-rector, said there was increased security at the school, and joined community leaders in condemning the attacks, noting there is a Laval campus in Ste-Foy.

“We can only say that they are horrible, intolerable — I can think of no other words,” Bauce said. “I join with those who have testified with respect to their support for the Muslim community of Quebec City.”

REACTION TO SHOOTING

Vigils to be held in Hamilton and Burlington

Trump calls Trudeau to offer condolences

Prayer vigil planned for Kitchener City Hall Monday night

Guelph vigil to be held on Monday night

The toll of the deadly attack, which authorities are calling an act of terror, grew overnight as police investigators attempted to hone in on the movements and possible motives of the two individuals believed responsible for the killings

The horror that started just as Sunday evening prayers ended left six people dead and another 19 injured — two critically with significant injuries “mainly to the abdomen,” a spokesperson for Centre Hospitalier Universite Laval said. The rest have been treated and released.

The victims, all male, ranged in age from 35 to 60 years. Police said there were another 39 people inside the Cultural Centre of Quebec’s Grand Mosque as Sunday prayers ended. That’s when two individuals said to be wearing ski masks and carrying firearms burst into the building and opened fire on the worshippers, according to witness accounts.

At a press conference Monday morning police released little information about the alleged shooters — except to say they are men, were not known to police, and are in their 20s and 30s. Police refused to release their identities “out of respect for the judicial process.”

Frantic calls reporting shots fired at the mosque started coming in at 7:50 p.m. Sunday. The first suspect was arrested at the scene, police said Monday.

The second suspect contacted 911 around 8:10 pm, parked close to the nearby the L’Ile-d’Orleans bridge, said he was armed and would cooperate.

Though the identities, motives and associations of the two shooters are not yet known, officials and political leaders have not hesitated to label the killings.

“We condemn this terrorist attack on Muslims in a centre of worship and refuge,” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in a statement late Sunday night.

Trudeau is scheduled to make a statement to the country from the floor of the Commons Monday. He has cancelled a planned speech this evening to fly to Quebec City later today, his office said.

Quebec City police, the provincial police and the RCMP have combined forces for the investigation in accordance with an official terrorism protocol that was invoked at around 10 p.m. Roughly 200 police officers were on duty last night.

A team of national security investigators that include integrated members of Quebec police forces are now involved in the investigation into the shooting, said a spokesman for Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale.

Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard said there would be increased security at mosques and other places of worship throughout the province in the wake of the killings.

“It would seem obvious to everyone. This is a murderous act targeting a specific community.”

On rue du Tracel in the neighbourhood of Cap-Rouge, neighbours of one of the men initially in custody said police had arrived at the residence around 9 a.m. on Monday. Neighbours said they were shocked to learn of his alleged involvement in the shooting and had heard about Bisonette’s involvement through media reports.

One couple who lived next door but asked not to be named told the Star they had “no negative comments” about the family. Another search was conducted in an apartment building located just around the corner from the mosque. Police had blocked off the area near that building Monday morning.

Mohamed Yangui, president of the Islamic Cultural Centre of Quebec, said in an interview Sunday evening that there had been no recent threats or incidents targeting the mosque or members of the community, although there was one high-profile hate incident in which someone left a severed pig’s head at the entrance to the community centre last June during Ramadan with a note reading: “Bon appetit.” Observant Muslims refrain from eating pork.

Asked who might commit such an act, or why, Yangui said: “I have no idea. Really, no idea.”

In a statement, the Canadian Council of Imams condemned the killings, which it attributed to “Islamophobia.”

“Our message to anyone in the Canadian Muslim community who may experience Islamophobia is not to suffer in silence. We must report acts of hate and bring them to the attention of our fellow citizens,” the statement read.

“As Canadian Muslims we know how devastating it is to be blamed for the actions of a few. We reject blaming any community, culture or religion for these murders. We are all Canadians and we are all bound by this tragedy together.”

The killings have sent shock waves throughout Quebec City’s Muslim community, but also across the province and the country.

Flags at schools from the Peel District School board flew at half mast Monday and officials said they were working to get resources to schools to help with conversations with students and tips for family, according to an email sent to all schools Monday.

Messages of sympathy and condemnation also flooded in from politicians around the world, including from New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, French President François Hollande and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

“This murder of people who had gathered at a mosque to pray is staggering in its cruelty and cynicism,” Putin said in a statement released Monday morning.

Justin Trudeau spoke with U.S. President Donald Trump, who expressed his condolences to Canadians following the attack.

The City of Paris is turning off the Eiffel Tower’s lights starting at midnight out of respect for the victims.

Quebec City Mayor Regis Labeaume, who fought back tears when he addressed reporters the night before, met with religious leaders Monday morning at city hall.

Labeaume said the city has been speaking with members of the mosque and the Muslim community at large to determine what they need in the wake of the shooting, and they will meet with them again tomorrow.

Members of the Ste-Foy mosque, who were not present at the shooting, were also on hand, thanking government officials and Quebecers for their outpouring of support.

“This solidarity honours us and honours you. It is a tribute to you,” said one mosque member.

Later in the day, in both Quebec City and Montreal, organizers planned to hold vigils in honour of the victims of the attack. The Montreal vigil is set to take place at 6 pm at near Parc Station.

Cities across the country — from London to Edmonton — were also planning their own gatherings.

Quebec Premier Couillard also had a specific message for Muslims in the province, who have long expressed concerns about their religious freedoms during societal debates about religious accommodations and proposed legislation that was intended to boost secularism in Quebec.

“We are with you. You are at home. You are welcome here. You are all Quebecers. Together we have to continue to build an open, welcoming and peaceful society,” Couillard said.

But those affected by the killings would be forgiven if it didn’t quite feel that way, at least not right now.

“All out thoughts go to the children, to whom we must tell about the death of their fathers,” the Islamic Cultural Centre of Quebec City said in a message posted on its Facebook page. “That Allah provides them patience and endurance.”

QUEBEC MOSQUE SHOOTING - DETAILED MAP

Toronto Star

Only one suspect in Quebec City mosque shooting: police

The terrorist attack that started just as Sunday evening prayers ended left six people dead and another eight injured — five critically. The victims, all male, ranged in age from 35 to 60 years old.

News Jan 30, 2017 Toronto Star

— Quebec police are saying there is now only one person suspected in connection with the shooting at a Quebec mosque in the community of Ste-Foy that killed six people and injured 19.

One of the men considered to have carried out the deadly assault that killed six people, is now just a witness to the murders, the Surete du Quebec said in a tweet Monday afternoon.

The two men initially arrested were expected to appear in court later today, a court clerk told the Star.

The Star initially reported the names of the men given to the paper by the court clerk, but are now removing them until it becomes clear who remains a suspect in police custody.

There was a flurry of police activity on Monday morning at an apartment a few blocks from the mosque where one of the men had been renting a room in a basement. But officers left the residence around 11 a.m. without having searched his room.

The owner of the building told the Star that police told him they didn’t have the proper authorizations to search the room and that they would contact him if they obtained the proper authorizations from a judge.

Local media have reported that both men who were initially held by police are students at Quebec City’s Université Laval. The Star has not been able to confirm this information and a university spokesman also said he could not confirm it.

Eric Bauce, the school’s vice-rector, said there was increased security at the school, and joined community leaders in condemning the attacks, noting there is a Laval campus in Ste-Foy.

“We can only say that they are horrible, intolerable — I can think of no other words,” Bauce said. “I join with those who have testified with respect to their support for the Muslim community of Quebec City.”

REACTION TO SHOOTING

Vigils to be held in Hamilton and Burlington

Trump calls Trudeau to offer condolences

Prayer vigil planned for Kitchener City Hall Monday night

Guelph vigil to be held on Monday night

The toll of the deadly attack, which authorities are calling an act of terror, grew overnight as police investigators attempted to hone in on the movements and possible motives of the two individuals believed responsible for the killings

The horror that started just as Sunday evening prayers ended left six people dead and another 19 injured — two critically with significant injuries “mainly to the abdomen,” a spokesperson for Centre Hospitalier Universite Laval said. The rest have been treated and released.

The victims, all male, ranged in age from 35 to 60 years. Police said there were another 39 people inside the Cultural Centre of Quebec’s Grand Mosque as Sunday prayers ended. That’s when two individuals said to be wearing ski masks and carrying firearms burst into the building and opened fire on the worshippers, according to witness accounts.

At a press conference Monday morning police released little information about the alleged shooters — except to say they are men, were not known to police, and are in their 20s and 30s. Police refused to release their identities “out of respect for the judicial process.”

Frantic calls reporting shots fired at the mosque started coming in at 7:50 p.m. Sunday. The first suspect was arrested at the scene, police said Monday.

The second suspect contacted 911 around 8:10 pm, parked close to the nearby the L’Ile-d’Orleans bridge, said he was armed and would cooperate.

Though the identities, motives and associations of the two shooters are not yet known, officials and political leaders have not hesitated to label the killings.

“We condemn this terrorist attack on Muslims in a centre of worship and refuge,” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in a statement late Sunday night.

Trudeau is scheduled to make a statement to the country from the floor of the Commons Monday. He has cancelled a planned speech this evening to fly to Quebec City later today, his office said.

Quebec City police, the provincial police and the RCMP have combined forces for the investigation in accordance with an official terrorism protocol that was invoked at around 10 p.m. Roughly 200 police officers were on duty last night.

A team of national security investigators that include integrated members of Quebec police forces are now involved in the investigation into the shooting, said a spokesman for Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale.

Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard said there would be increased security at mosques and other places of worship throughout the province in the wake of the killings.

“It would seem obvious to everyone. This is a murderous act targeting a specific community.”

On rue du Tracel in the neighbourhood of Cap-Rouge, neighbours of one of the men initially in custody said police had arrived at the residence around 9 a.m. on Monday. Neighbours said they were shocked to learn of his alleged involvement in the shooting and had heard about Bisonette’s involvement through media reports.

One couple who lived next door but asked not to be named told the Star they had “no negative comments” about the family. Another search was conducted in an apartment building located just around the corner from the mosque. Police had blocked off the area near that building Monday morning.

Mohamed Yangui, president of the Islamic Cultural Centre of Quebec, said in an interview Sunday evening that there had been no recent threats or incidents targeting the mosque or members of the community, although there was one high-profile hate incident in which someone left a severed pig’s head at the entrance to the community centre last June during Ramadan with a note reading: “Bon appetit.” Observant Muslims refrain from eating pork.

Asked who might commit such an act, or why, Yangui said: “I have no idea. Really, no idea.”

In a statement, the Canadian Council of Imams condemned the killings, which it attributed to “Islamophobia.”

“Our message to anyone in the Canadian Muslim community who may experience Islamophobia is not to suffer in silence. We must report acts of hate and bring them to the attention of our fellow citizens,” the statement read.

“As Canadian Muslims we know how devastating it is to be blamed for the actions of a few. We reject blaming any community, culture or religion for these murders. We are all Canadians and we are all bound by this tragedy together.”

The killings have sent shock waves throughout Quebec City’s Muslim community, but also across the province and the country.

Flags at schools from the Peel District School board flew at half mast Monday and officials said they were working to get resources to schools to help with conversations with students and tips for family, according to an email sent to all schools Monday.

Messages of sympathy and condemnation also flooded in from politicians around the world, including from New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, French President François Hollande and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

“This murder of people who had gathered at a mosque to pray is staggering in its cruelty and cynicism,” Putin said in a statement released Monday morning.

Justin Trudeau spoke with U.S. President Donald Trump, who expressed his condolences to Canadians following the attack.

The City of Paris is turning off the Eiffel Tower’s lights starting at midnight out of respect for the victims.

Quebec City Mayor Regis Labeaume, who fought back tears when he addressed reporters the night before, met with religious leaders Monday morning at city hall.

Labeaume said the city has been speaking with members of the mosque and the Muslim community at large to determine what they need in the wake of the shooting, and they will meet with them again tomorrow.

Members of the Ste-Foy mosque, who were not present at the shooting, were also on hand, thanking government officials and Quebecers for their outpouring of support.

“This solidarity honours us and honours you. It is a tribute to you,” said one mosque member.

Later in the day, in both Quebec City and Montreal, organizers planned to hold vigils in honour of the victims of the attack. The Montreal vigil is set to take place at 6 pm at near Parc Station.

Cities across the country — from London to Edmonton — were also planning their own gatherings.

Quebec Premier Couillard also had a specific message for Muslims in the province, who have long expressed concerns about their religious freedoms during societal debates about religious accommodations and proposed legislation that was intended to boost secularism in Quebec.

“We are with you. You are at home. You are welcome here. You are all Quebecers. Together we have to continue to build an open, welcoming and peaceful society,” Couillard said.

But those affected by the killings would be forgiven if it didn’t quite feel that way, at least not right now.

“All out thoughts go to the children, to whom we must tell about the death of their fathers,” the Islamic Cultural Centre of Quebec City said in a message posted on its Facebook page. “That Allah provides them patience and endurance.”

QUEBEC MOSQUE SHOOTING - DETAILED MAP

Toronto Star

Only one suspect in Quebec City mosque shooting: police

The terrorist attack that started just as Sunday evening prayers ended left six people dead and another eight injured — five critically. The victims, all male, ranged in age from 35 to 60 years old.

News Jan 30, 2017 Toronto Star

— Quebec police are saying there is now only one person suspected in connection with the shooting at a Quebec mosque in the community of Ste-Foy that killed six people and injured 19.

One of the men considered to have carried out the deadly assault that killed six people, is now just a witness to the murders, the Surete du Quebec said in a tweet Monday afternoon.

The two men initially arrested were expected to appear in court later today, a court clerk told the Star.

The Star initially reported the names of the men given to the paper by the court clerk, but are now removing them until it becomes clear who remains a suspect in police custody.

There was a flurry of police activity on Monday morning at an apartment a few blocks from the mosque where one of the men had been renting a room in a basement. But officers left the residence around 11 a.m. without having searched his room.

The owner of the building told the Star that police told him they didn’t have the proper authorizations to search the room and that they would contact him if they obtained the proper authorizations from a judge.

Local media have reported that both men who were initially held by police are students at Quebec City’s Université Laval. The Star has not been able to confirm this information and a university spokesman also said he could not confirm it.

Eric Bauce, the school’s vice-rector, said there was increased security at the school, and joined community leaders in condemning the attacks, noting there is a Laval campus in Ste-Foy.

“We can only say that they are horrible, intolerable — I can think of no other words,” Bauce said. “I join with those who have testified with respect to their support for the Muslim community of Quebec City.”

REACTION TO SHOOTING

Vigils to be held in Hamilton and Burlington

Trump calls Trudeau to offer condolences

Prayer vigil planned for Kitchener City Hall Monday night

Guelph vigil to be held on Monday night

The toll of the deadly attack, which authorities are calling an act of terror, grew overnight as police investigators attempted to hone in on the movements and possible motives of the two individuals believed responsible for the killings

The horror that started just as Sunday evening prayers ended left six people dead and another 19 injured — two critically with significant injuries “mainly to the abdomen,” a spokesperson for Centre Hospitalier Universite Laval said. The rest have been treated and released.

The victims, all male, ranged in age from 35 to 60 years. Police said there were another 39 people inside the Cultural Centre of Quebec’s Grand Mosque as Sunday prayers ended. That’s when two individuals said to be wearing ski masks and carrying firearms burst into the building and opened fire on the worshippers, according to witness accounts.

At a press conference Monday morning police released little information about the alleged shooters — except to say they are men, were not known to police, and are in their 20s and 30s. Police refused to release their identities “out of respect for the judicial process.”

Frantic calls reporting shots fired at the mosque started coming in at 7:50 p.m. Sunday. The first suspect was arrested at the scene, police said Monday.

The second suspect contacted 911 around 8:10 pm, parked close to the nearby the L’Ile-d’Orleans bridge, said he was armed and would cooperate.

Though the identities, motives and associations of the two shooters are not yet known, officials and political leaders have not hesitated to label the killings.

“We condemn this terrorist attack on Muslims in a centre of worship and refuge,” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in a statement late Sunday night.

Trudeau is scheduled to make a statement to the country from the floor of the Commons Monday. He has cancelled a planned speech this evening to fly to Quebec City later today, his office said.

Quebec City police, the provincial police and the RCMP have combined forces for the investigation in accordance with an official terrorism protocol that was invoked at around 10 p.m. Roughly 200 police officers were on duty last night.

A team of national security investigators that include integrated members of Quebec police forces are now involved in the investigation into the shooting, said a spokesman for Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale.

Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard said there would be increased security at mosques and other places of worship throughout the province in the wake of the killings.

“It would seem obvious to everyone. This is a murderous act targeting a specific community.”

On rue du Tracel in the neighbourhood of Cap-Rouge, neighbours of one of the men initially in custody said police had arrived at the residence around 9 a.m. on Monday. Neighbours said they were shocked to learn of his alleged involvement in the shooting and had heard about Bisonette’s involvement through media reports.

One couple who lived next door but asked not to be named told the Star they had “no negative comments” about the family. Another search was conducted in an apartment building located just around the corner from the mosque. Police had blocked off the area near that building Monday morning.

Mohamed Yangui, president of the Islamic Cultural Centre of Quebec, said in an interview Sunday evening that there had been no recent threats or incidents targeting the mosque or members of the community, although there was one high-profile hate incident in which someone left a severed pig’s head at the entrance to the community centre last June during Ramadan with a note reading: “Bon appetit.” Observant Muslims refrain from eating pork.

Asked who might commit such an act, or why, Yangui said: “I have no idea. Really, no idea.”

In a statement, the Canadian Council of Imams condemned the killings, which it attributed to “Islamophobia.”

“Our message to anyone in the Canadian Muslim community who may experience Islamophobia is not to suffer in silence. We must report acts of hate and bring them to the attention of our fellow citizens,” the statement read.

“As Canadian Muslims we know how devastating it is to be blamed for the actions of a few. We reject blaming any community, culture or religion for these murders. We are all Canadians and we are all bound by this tragedy together.”

The killings have sent shock waves throughout Quebec City’s Muslim community, but also across the province and the country.

Flags at schools from the Peel District School board flew at half mast Monday and officials said they were working to get resources to schools to help with conversations with students and tips for family, according to an email sent to all schools Monday.

Messages of sympathy and condemnation also flooded in from politicians around the world, including from New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, French President François Hollande and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

“This murder of people who had gathered at a mosque to pray is staggering in its cruelty and cynicism,” Putin said in a statement released Monday morning.

Justin Trudeau spoke with U.S. President Donald Trump, who expressed his condolences to Canadians following the attack.

The City of Paris is turning off the Eiffel Tower’s lights starting at midnight out of respect for the victims.

Quebec City Mayor Regis Labeaume, who fought back tears when he addressed reporters the night before, met with religious leaders Monday morning at city hall.

Labeaume said the city has been speaking with members of the mosque and the Muslim community at large to determine what they need in the wake of the shooting, and they will meet with them again tomorrow.

Members of the Ste-Foy mosque, who were not present at the shooting, were also on hand, thanking government officials and Quebecers for their outpouring of support.

“This solidarity honours us and honours you. It is a tribute to you,” said one mosque member.

Later in the day, in both Quebec City and Montreal, organizers planned to hold vigils in honour of the victims of the attack. The Montreal vigil is set to take place at 6 pm at near Parc Station.

Cities across the country — from London to Edmonton — were also planning their own gatherings.

Quebec Premier Couillard also had a specific message for Muslims in the province, who have long expressed concerns about their religious freedoms during societal debates about religious accommodations and proposed legislation that was intended to boost secularism in Quebec.

“We are with you. You are at home. You are welcome here. You are all Quebecers. Together we have to continue to build an open, welcoming and peaceful society,” Couillard said.

But those affected by the killings would be forgiven if it didn’t quite feel that way, at least not right now.

“All out thoughts go to the children, to whom we must tell about the death of their fathers,” the Islamic Cultural Centre of Quebec City said in a message posted on its Facebook page. “That Allah provides them patience and endurance.”

QUEBEC MOSQUE SHOOTING - DETAILED MAP

Toronto Star