Conservative MP Lisa Raitt says O’Leary, Leitch will stop party from defeating Liberals

News Jan 19, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

 Milton MP and Conservative leadership contender Lisa Raitt says her opponents in the race, MP Kellie Leitch and entrepreneur Kevin O’Leary, will prevent the party from defeating the Liberals in the next federal election if they win.

“I worry that Kellie and Kevin both have said things in the past that will alienate the people we need to give us a majority,” said Raitt in an interview.

Raitt said Leitch’s proposed screening of immigrants for “Canadian values” is nothing more than a pretext to boost her image as a law and order politician.

The mother of two teenage boys says: “I don’t know what we need to do to make our immigration system better.” But improving Canada’s security by filling out a questionnaire at the border “is not going to address security concerns,” she said.

As for O’Leary, Raitt, who helped to create a website stopkevinoleary.com to debunk the television star’s policies prior to his leadership announcement Jan. 18, said O’Leary has talked about jailing union members.

“I’ve got union members in my family,” she said. “It’s a silly comment, but he does it for the theatrics. We don’t have the latitude where we are going to be fighting fire on what the leader says.”

Raitt said during the 2015 federal election too many times Conservative candidates were defending and explaining the party and its leader, Stephen Harper, to voters rather than promoting the “good polices” the party produced.

“I don’t want to do that in 2019,” she said. “I would rather talk about (Prime Minister Justin) Trudeau and his cow bell tour. Talk about an arrogant way to describe talking to people in small towns.”

And not only did the party lose potential voters in urban areas and from diverse demographic groups, Raitt, 49, said it didn’t do well with adult working women as well.

“I believe we have policies that make a lot of sense for moms and dads out there,” she said.

Raitt revealed last month that her longtime partner, Bruce Wood, who is in his 50s, is battling early onset Alzheimer’s.

Raitt, a former chief executive officer of the Toronto Port Authority, who was speaking to the Hamilton chapter of the Macdonald Cartier Club at Carmen’s C Hotel on Jan. 19 in front of about 100 people, outlined her proposed tax plan which she was going to officially announce later in the day.

Her proposals include not taxing the first $15,000 on income, which would provide savings of about $500 per person, cutting the corporate tax on small businesses to 9 per cent, and raising the ceiling on the popular tax-free savings account to $10,000.

“If you had more money in your pocket, you are better able to take care of your family,” said Raitt, who is a native of Sydney, Cape Breton.

Raitt said she will pay for the tax cuts by eliminating government waste, and “growing the economy.”

One of Raitt’s fears is that soon-to-be United States President Donald Trump will slap a tax on the border against any country that he believes is promoting unfair trade practices. It means protecting the North American Free Trade Agreement, approving the Trans-Pacific Partnership and establishing trade deals with the United Kingdom and Europe, she said.

She called the election of Trump “a different world.” But when asked if she would be attending the Women’s March at Queen’s Park Jan. 21, Raitt rejected the idea.

As a sitting MP, Raitt said she wouldn’t get drawn into events that have political undertones, especially if it involved another nation, but as the second women in a field of 14 Conservative leadership contenders and a former transportation minister, she said Canada “does have equal treatment” of women.

Raitt backs the idea of removing foreign ownership for airlines, but there should be the tools available to enforce violations if needed.

Asked at the breakfast meeting for her views on the future of the CBC, a bone of contention for some Conservative leadership hopefuls, Raitt said she doesn’t want to abolish the Crown Corporation.

She said if the CBC just stuck to its mandate to provide local news, it would find a friend at the Prime Minister's Office.

“They have to account for what they are spending,” she said. “Everybody wants their local news.”

Raitt said when she was first elected in 2008 she was considered a “Harper Conservative.” It’s a term she maintains, saying social conservatives would be welcome in her party.

“They represent their communities,” said Raitt, referring to MPs.

But she stressed that all MPs need to follow the “Conservative playbook” when it comes to government policy.

She would allow MPs to introduce private members’ bills of “special and different concerns” including abortion or other social conservative issues.

“Absolutely,” she said.

The Macdonald Cartier Club in Hamilton is scheduled to host Conservative leadership contender Leitch at Carmen’s C Hotel Feb. 16 starting at 7 a.m.

Conservative MP Lisa Raitt says O’Leary, Leitch will stop party from defeating Liberals

News Jan 19, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

 Milton MP and Conservative leadership contender Lisa Raitt says her opponents in the race, MP Kellie Leitch and entrepreneur Kevin O’Leary, will prevent the party from defeating the Liberals in the next federal election if they win.

“I worry that Kellie and Kevin both have said things in the past that will alienate the people we need to give us a majority,” said Raitt in an interview.

Raitt said Leitch’s proposed screening of immigrants for “Canadian values” is nothing more than a pretext to boost her image as a law and order politician.

The mother of two teenage boys says: “I don’t know what we need to do to make our immigration system better.” But improving Canada’s security by filling out a questionnaire at the border “is not going to address security concerns,” she said.

As for O’Leary, Raitt, who helped to create a website stopkevinoleary.com to debunk the television star’s policies prior to his leadership announcement Jan. 18, said O’Leary has talked about jailing union members.

“I’ve got union members in my family,” she said. “It’s a silly comment, but he does it for the theatrics. We don’t have the latitude where we are going to be fighting fire on what the leader says.”

Raitt said during the 2015 federal election too many times Conservative candidates were defending and explaining the party and its leader, Stephen Harper, to voters rather than promoting the “good polices” the party produced.

“I don’t want to do that in 2019,” she said. “I would rather talk about (Prime Minister Justin) Trudeau and his cow bell tour. Talk about an arrogant way to describe talking to people in small towns.”

And not only did the party lose potential voters in urban areas and from diverse demographic groups, Raitt, 49, said it didn’t do well with adult working women as well.

“I believe we have policies that make a lot of sense for moms and dads out there,” she said.

Raitt revealed last month that her longtime partner, Bruce Wood, who is in his 50s, is battling early onset Alzheimer’s.

Raitt, a former chief executive officer of the Toronto Port Authority, who was speaking to the Hamilton chapter of the Macdonald Cartier Club at Carmen’s C Hotel on Jan. 19 in front of about 100 people, outlined her proposed tax plan which she was going to officially announce later in the day.

Her proposals include not taxing the first $15,000 on income, which would provide savings of about $500 per person, cutting the corporate tax on small businesses to 9 per cent, and raising the ceiling on the popular tax-free savings account to $10,000.

“If you had more money in your pocket, you are better able to take care of your family,” said Raitt, who is a native of Sydney, Cape Breton.

Raitt said she will pay for the tax cuts by eliminating government waste, and “growing the economy.”

One of Raitt’s fears is that soon-to-be United States President Donald Trump will slap a tax on the border against any country that he believes is promoting unfair trade practices. It means protecting the North American Free Trade Agreement, approving the Trans-Pacific Partnership and establishing trade deals with the United Kingdom and Europe, she said.

She called the election of Trump “a different world.” But when asked if she would be attending the Women’s March at Queen’s Park Jan. 21, Raitt rejected the idea.

As a sitting MP, Raitt said she wouldn’t get drawn into events that have political undertones, especially if it involved another nation, but as the second women in a field of 14 Conservative leadership contenders and a former transportation minister, she said Canada “does have equal treatment” of women.

Raitt backs the idea of removing foreign ownership for airlines, but there should be the tools available to enforce violations if needed.

Asked at the breakfast meeting for her views on the future of the CBC, a bone of contention for some Conservative leadership hopefuls, Raitt said she doesn’t want to abolish the Crown Corporation.

She said if the CBC just stuck to its mandate to provide local news, it would find a friend at the Prime Minister's Office.

“They have to account for what they are spending,” she said. “Everybody wants their local news.”

Raitt said when she was first elected in 2008 she was considered a “Harper Conservative.” It’s a term she maintains, saying social conservatives would be welcome in her party.

“They represent their communities,” said Raitt, referring to MPs.

But she stressed that all MPs need to follow the “Conservative playbook” when it comes to government policy.

She would allow MPs to introduce private members’ bills of “special and different concerns” including abortion or other social conservative issues.

“Absolutely,” she said.

The Macdonald Cartier Club in Hamilton is scheduled to host Conservative leadership contender Leitch at Carmen’s C Hotel Feb. 16 starting at 7 a.m.

Conservative MP Lisa Raitt says O’Leary, Leitch will stop party from defeating Liberals

News Jan 19, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

 Milton MP and Conservative leadership contender Lisa Raitt says her opponents in the race, MP Kellie Leitch and entrepreneur Kevin O’Leary, will prevent the party from defeating the Liberals in the next federal election if they win.

“I worry that Kellie and Kevin both have said things in the past that will alienate the people we need to give us a majority,” said Raitt in an interview.

Raitt said Leitch’s proposed screening of immigrants for “Canadian values” is nothing more than a pretext to boost her image as a law and order politician.

The mother of two teenage boys says: “I don’t know what we need to do to make our immigration system better.” But improving Canada’s security by filling out a questionnaire at the border “is not going to address security concerns,” she said.

As for O’Leary, Raitt, who helped to create a website stopkevinoleary.com to debunk the television star’s policies prior to his leadership announcement Jan. 18, said O’Leary has talked about jailing union members.

“I’ve got union members in my family,” she said. “It’s a silly comment, but he does it for the theatrics. We don’t have the latitude where we are going to be fighting fire on what the leader says.”

Raitt said during the 2015 federal election too many times Conservative candidates were defending and explaining the party and its leader, Stephen Harper, to voters rather than promoting the “good polices” the party produced.

“I don’t want to do that in 2019,” she said. “I would rather talk about (Prime Minister Justin) Trudeau and his cow bell tour. Talk about an arrogant way to describe talking to people in small towns.”

And not only did the party lose potential voters in urban areas and from diverse demographic groups, Raitt, 49, said it didn’t do well with adult working women as well.

“I believe we have policies that make a lot of sense for moms and dads out there,” she said.

Raitt revealed last month that her longtime partner, Bruce Wood, who is in his 50s, is battling early onset Alzheimer’s.

Raitt, a former chief executive officer of the Toronto Port Authority, who was speaking to the Hamilton chapter of the Macdonald Cartier Club at Carmen’s C Hotel on Jan. 19 in front of about 100 people, outlined her proposed tax plan which she was going to officially announce later in the day.

Her proposals include not taxing the first $15,000 on income, which would provide savings of about $500 per person, cutting the corporate tax on small businesses to 9 per cent, and raising the ceiling on the popular tax-free savings account to $10,000.

“If you had more money in your pocket, you are better able to take care of your family,” said Raitt, who is a native of Sydney, Cape Breton.

Raitt said she will pay for the tax cuts by eliminating government waste, and “growing the economy.”

One of Raitt’s fears is that soon-to-be United States President Donald Trump will slap a tax on the border against any country that he believes is promoting unfair trade practices. It means protecting the North American Free Trade Agreement, approving the Trans-Pacific Partnership and establishing trade deals with the United Kingdom and Europe, she said.

She called the election of Trump “a different world.” But when asked if she would be attending the Women’s March at Queen’s Park Jan. 21, Raitt rejected the idea.

As a sitting MP, Raitt said she wouldn’t get drawn into events that have political undertones, especially if it involved another nation, but as the second women in a field of 14 Conservative leadership contenders and a former transportation minister, she said Canada “does have equal treatment” of women.

Raitt backs the idea of removing foreign ownership for airlines, but there should be the tools available to enforce violations if needed.

Asked at the breakfast meeting for her views on the future of the CBC, a bone of contention for some Conservative leadership hopefuls, Raitt said she doesn’t want to abolish the Crown Corporation.

She said if the CBC just stuck to its mandate to provide local news, it would find a friend at the Prime Minister's Office.

“They have to account for what they are spending,” she said. “Everybody wants their local news.”

Raitt said when she was first elected in 2008 she was considered a “Harper Conservative.” It’s a term she maintains, saying social conservatives would be welcome in her party.

“They represent their communities,” said Raitt, referring to MPs.

But she stressed that all MPs need to follow the “Conservative playbook” when it comes to government policy.

She would allow MPs to introduce private members’ bills of “special and different concerns” including abortion or other social conservative issues.

“Absolutely,” she said.

The Macdonald Cartier Club in Hamilton is scheduled to host Conservative leadership contender Leitch at Carmen’s C Hotel Feb. 16 starting at 7 a.m.