Federal Conservative leadership candidate Scheer wants government out of CBC news business

News Dec 08, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Federal Conservative leadership candidate and MP Andrew Scheer may disagree with Simcoe-Grey Conservative MP Kellie Leitch on how to screen immigrants wanting to come to Canada, but both are on common ground talking about getting the government out of the news business.

While Leitch, also a leadership hopeful, has said she wants to “dismantle” the CBC, Scheer says the federal government has to eliminate the CBC’s news division.

“I think taxpayers are very frustrated by how much the CBC costs,” said Scheer in an interview. “I don’t know why this government is in the news business in this day and age with so many platforms with so many ways to disseminate information.”

He says the government has a “glaring” conflict operating the CBC.

“News is one thing I never believed the government should be in,” he said.

Scheer, who spoke to about 35 people of the Macdonald-Cartier Club Dec. 8 at Carmen’s C Hotel, says while he wants beefed up security to investigate immigrants arriving in Canada, he calls Leitch’s idea to screen newcomers for “Canadian values” an attempt at politics.

“It’s not authentic,” he says. “Canadian values? I’ve never heard her articulate what those Canadian values are.”

But Scheer, 37, who was first elected MP in 2004 representing the Saskatchewan riding of Regina-Qu’Appelle, says Canadians “can’t sacrifice the security of our own people” by not properly screening immigrants for possible links to radical groups.

He says one of the lessons from United States President-elect Donald Trump’s victory in the recent election is he tapped into a frustration that is prominent within a specific demographic in that country.

In Canada, said Scheer that frustration manifests itself when Liberals says Canada doesn’t have a national identity, prompting angry responses from Canadians.

“Donald Trump can only happen when the elites, or the media, left-wing parties push at on other view on some of these issues (Canadian identity) and that creates frustration that allows something like that to happen,” he said.

Scheer, married with five children, calls himself a “real Conservative” that proposes to cut corporate taxes, unite the Tories regardless of who they are and trumpet a “positive” message for both the party and Canadians.

He says the proposed carbon tax Ontario will be implementing in January and the federal government is contemplating will be a “job killer” at a time when other countries, including the United States, France and Australia, have pulled back their plans to establish similar carbon programs. He says the British Columbia’s economy would be much better off without its carbon tax.

“I’ve never met a tax cut I haven’t liked,” he said.

He says the United States under Trump is poised to introduce one of the largest corporate tax cuts in history and Canada should respond accordingly with an “ambitious” jobs program.

He blasted the Liberals for trying to “spend your way into prosperity” and “you can’t tax your way into job growth.”

Scheer says one of the best government stimulus programs that should be supported is to build the Northern Gateway pipeline project. He also condemned the Trudeau government’s proposal to ban crude oil tankers along British Columbia’s north coast.

“I don’t see them banning tankers full of Saudi Arabian crude oil coming up the St. Lawrence River,” he said.

He said pipelines are the safest way to transport oil, removing “millions of barrels of oil” from trains and highways.

“There are a lot of issues with our economy,” he said. “We should be looking at policies to make it easier to hire people. It’s not a surprise to me that the skyrocketing hydro rates in Ontario are making (Canada) less competitive.”

Scheer is one of 14 candidates seeking to replace former leader Stephen Harper. The candidates are scheduled for a debate in French Jan 17 in Quebec City. There will be two other debates scheduled before the leadership vote occurs May 27.

The Hamilton chapter of the Macdonald-Cartier Club will host Conservative leadership candidate Halton MP Lisa Raitt at its Jan. 19 breakfast meeting starting at 7 a.m. at Carmen’s C Hotel.

The club will also be hosting its third Prayer Breakfast Jan. 7 at Carmen’s starting at 9 a.m.

Federal Conservative leadership candidate Scheer wants government out of CBC news business

News Dec 08, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Federal Conservative leadership candidate and MP Andrew Scheer may disagree with Simcoe-Grey Conservative MP Kellie Leitch on how to screen immigrants wanting to come to Canada, but both are on common ground talking about getting the government out of the news business.

While Leitch, also a leadership hopeful, has said she wants to “dismantle” the CBC, Scheer says the federal government has to eliminate the CBC’s news division.

“I think taxpayers are very frustrated by how much the CBC costs,” said Scheer in an interview. “I don’t know why this government is in the news business in this day and age with so many platforms with so many ways to disseminate information.”

He says the government has a “glaring” conflict operating the CBC.

“News is one thing I never believed the government should be in,” he said.

Scheer, who spoke to about 35 people of the Macdonald-Cartier Club Dec. 8 at Carmen’s C Hotel, says while he wants beefed up security to investigate immigrants arriving in Canada, he calls Leitch’s idea to screen newcomers for “Canadian values” an attempt at politics.

“It’s not authentic,” he says. “Canadian values? I’ve never heard her articulate what those Canadian values are.”

But Scheer, 37, who was first elected MP in 2004 representing the Saskatchewan riding of Regina-Qu’Appelle, says Canadians “can’t sacrifice the security of our own people” by not properly screening immigrants for possible links to radical groups.

He says one of the lessons from United States President-elect Donald Trump’s victory in the recent election is he tapped into a frustration that is prominent within a specific demographic in that country.

In Canada, said Scheer that frustration manifests itself when Liberals says Canada doesn’t have a national identity, prompting angry responses from Canadians.

“Donald Trump can only happen when the elites, or the media, left-wing parties push at on other view on some of these issues (Canadian identity) and that creates frustration that allows something like that to happen,” he said.

Scheer, married with five children, calls himself a “real Conservative” that proposes to cut corporate taxes, unite the Tories regardless of who they are and trumpet a “positive” message for both the party and Canadians.

He says the proposed carbon tax Ontario will be implementing in January and the federal government is contemplating will be a “job killer” at a time when other countries, including the United States, France and Australia, have pulled back their plans to establish similar carbon programs. He says the British Columbia’s economy would be much better off without its carbon tax.

“I’ve never met a tax cut I haven’t liked,” he said.

He says the United States under Trump is poised to introduce one of the largest corporate tax cuts in history and Canada should respond accordingly with an “ambitious” jobs program.

He blasted the Liberals for trying to “spend your way into prosperity” and “you can’t tax your way into job growth.”

Scheer says one of the best government stimulus programs that should be supported is to build the Northern Gateway pipeline project. He also condemned the Trudeau government’s proposal to ban crude oil tankers along British Columbia’s north coast.

“I don’t see them banning tankers full of Saudi Arabian crude oil coming up the St. Lawrence River,” he said.

He said pipelines are the safest way to transport oil, removing “millions of barrels of oil” from trains and highways.

“There are a lot of issues with our economy,” he said. “We should be looking at policies to make it easier to hire people. It’s not a surprise to me that the skyrocketing hydro rates in Ontario are making (Canada) less competitive.”

Scheer is one of 14 candidates seeking to replace former leader Stephen Harper. The candidates are scheduled for a debate in French Jan 17 in Quebec City. There will be two other debates scheduled before the leadership vote occurs May 27.

The Hamilton chapter of the Macdonald-Cartier Club will host Conservative leadership candidate Halton MP Lisa Raitt at its Jan. 19 breakfast meeting starting at 7 a.m. at Carmen’s C Hotel.

The club will also be hosting its third Prayer Breakfast Jan. 7 at Carmen’s starting at 9 a.m.

Federal Conservative leadership candidate Scheer wants government out of CBC news business

News Dec 08, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Federal Conservative leadership candidate and MP Andrew Scheer may disagree with Simcoe-Grey Conservative MP Kellie Leitch on how to screen immigrants wanting to come to Canada, but both are on common ground talking about getting the government out of the news business.

While Leitch, also a leadership hopeful, has said she wants to “dismantle” the CBC, Scheer says the federal government has to eliminate the CBC’s news division.

“I think taxpayers are very frustrated by how much the CBC costs,” said Scheer in an interview. “I don’t know why this government is in the news business in this day and age with so many platforms with so many ways to disseminate information.”

He says the government has a “glaring” conflict operating the CBC.

“News is one thing I never believed the government should be in,” he said.

Scheer, who spoke to about 35 people of the Macdonald-Cartier Club Dec. 8 at Carmen’s C Hotel, says while he wants beefed up security to investigate immigrants arriving in Canada, he calls Leitch’s idea to screen newcomers for “Canadian values” an attempt at politics.

“It’s not authentic,” he says. “Canadian values? I’ve never heard her articulate what those Canadian values are.”

But Scheer, 37, who was first elected MP in 2004 representing the Saskatchewan riding of Regina-Qu’Appelle, says Canadians “can’t sacrifice the security of our own people” by not properly screening immigrants for possible links to radical groups.

He says one of the lessons from United States President-elect Donald Trump’s victory in the recent election is he tapped into a frustration that is prominent within a specific demographic in that country.

In Canada, said Scheer that frustration manifests itself when Liberals says Canada doesn’t have a national identity, prompting angry responses from Canadians.

“Donald Trump can only happen when the elites, or the media, left-wing parties push at on other view on some of these issues (Canadian identity) and that creates frustration that allows something like that to happen,” he said.

Scheer, married with five children, calls himself a “real Conservative” that proposes to cut corporate taxes, unite the Tories regardless of who they are and trumpet a “positive” message for both the party and Canadians.

He says the proposed carbon tax Ontario will be implementing in January and the federal government is contemplating will be a “job killer” at a time when other countries, including the United States, France and Australia, have pulled back their plans to establish similar carbon programs. He says the British Columbia’s economy would be much better off without its carbon tax.

“I’ve never met a tax cut I haven’t liked,” he said.

He says the United States under Trump is poised to introduce one of the largest corporate tax cuts in history and Canada should respond accordingly with an “ambitious” jobs program.

He blasted the Liberals for trying to “spend your way into prosperity” and “you can’t tax your way into job growth.”

Scheer says one of the best government stimulus programs that should be supported is to build the Northern Gateway pipeline project. He also condemned the Trudeau government’s proposal to ban crude oil tankers along British Columbia’s north coast.

“I don’t see them banning tankers full of Saudi Arabian crude oil coming up the St. Lawrence River,” he said.

He said pipelines are the safest way to transport oil, removing “millions of barrels of oil” from trains and highways.

“There are a lot of issues with our economy,” he said. “We should be looking at policies to make it easier to hire people. It’s not a surprise to me that the skyrocketing hydro rates in Ontario are making (Canada) less competitive.”

Scheer is one of 14 candidates seeking to replace former leader Stephen Harper. The candidates are scheduled for a debate in French Jan 17 in Quebec City. There will be two other debates scheduled before the leadership vote occurs May 27.

The Hamilton chapter of the Macdonald-Cartier Club will host Conservative leadership candidate Halton MP Lisa Raitt at its Jan. 19 breakfast meeting starting at 7 a.m. at Carmen’s C Hotel.

The club will also be hosting its third Prayer Breakfast Jan. 7 at Carmen’s starting at 9 a.m.